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Did you check caliper moves freely on its pins. Other option try swapping wheels around. I have had vibration when braking before when my tyres were worn.
 

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Personally I check the run out if I suspect a 'warped' disk but I guess not everyone has DI.

Check for dirt or grease between the hub flange and the disk and make sure you wire brush any rust off the flange before putting the disk back on. Just a tiny bit of grit or blob of copperslip from a wheel nut can make the disk run out enough to cause vibration.

If everything is spotlessly clean and it still vibrates (and you had the wheels/tyres balanced as already suggested) you need to check the flange run out and wheel bearings.

So far I've only looked at the front disks on my 307, do the rears have the bearings in the disk or something? If so and it is a rear problem you will need to think about where the misalignment could be.
 

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Rear disc brakes on 307's can also have issues with sticking/jammed pads which can cause vibration when braking as often only one pad moves which result in the disc being pushed out of true
 

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Mostly under braking thought it was a warped disc but still there after replacing discs and pads
If it's not the brakes, it may very well be a worn or out of round tyre.

BTW Discs usually don't warp.

onallcylinders.com/2017/05/19/6-biggest-brake-rotor-myths-debunked

The most common cause of brake pulsing is the uneven deposition of brake friction material on the disc surface. Under normal use the friction of braking causes a microscopic layer of pad material to be transferred to the swept area of the disc. If this layer becomes uneven, under rotation the high point on the surface pushes back against the pad and through the hydraulic lines to the pedal. The height of the high point is fractions of a mm.

The brake system is a force multiplier converting a lot of travel at reasonable force at the pedal into minimal movement and multiplied force at the brake pads. In reverse minimal movement at the pad over the high point is converted to noticeable travel (pulsing) at the pedal.

The fix is either to re-bed the brake pads (a series of crash stops to get the brakes really hot and then let them cool -don't keep your foot clamped on the pedal when the brakes are hot and stationary, as this is what causes the high point in the first place). Re-bedding the brakes will give you an even coverage on the disc surface.

Or, get the discs skimmed by a brake specialist if the high point is bad. Often a high point collects more pad material under use and so gets progressively worse.
 
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