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Hi – I’m new to this site but have been reading several threads with interest for the past few weeks.

From what I’m reading I have just about the worst combination of: living and commuting by car in a busy city, a very limited budget and a new-to-me diesel Peugeot 207SW that is 8 years old but in seemingly good nick, thankfully.

This is my first diesel and, not being at all mechanically minded but guided by my lack of funds, I want to learn the basics and try to maintain this car well to prevent costly repairs but I am struggling to get my head around what is a good maintenance routine.

When I bought the car I booked it in at the dealers for a major service and was surprised that they only replaced the oil and oil filter, the air filter, the wipers, and filled up the tyres. They did various checks that all came back good, but there was no fuel flush, no brake fluid or gearbox oil change, no replacement of spark plugs, no this or that for DPF, EGR… presumably it wasn’t needed, or they are jobs that fall outside the remit of a major service; but some of these are things that I am reading can cause problems for my car with my type of driving. And just to baffle me more, there seem to be lots of products on the market that all claim to be part of a good maintenance regime.

My question is, how do I navigate what is useful and what isn’t? There are too many products vying for my attention - and I can’t tell what should make up basic service maintenance by the garage and what should be my responsibility, and at what intervals.

Does anyone have a helpful maintenance routine that they can share? I'll be very grateful for any advice!
 

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Servicing is always a confusing issue as some seem to think a service means the car is good with NO PROBLEMS to come this is not the case

Diesels dont have spark plugs

DPF is not really a service part IF you even have 1

Oil changes every 10k miles max regardless off what anyone else says or even peugeot says filters at same time

IF you have a DPF then the fluid will need topped up at any mileage between 80 and 120k miles depends on how you use the car centre display will warn when its low do not ignore the warning as that is what causes the DPF problems people have.
DPF if everything is working properly is maintanance free but system looks for a replacement every 100k miles if working correctly you can just TELL it it has a new one.
 

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Thanks very much - told you I didn't know much about cars! :lol:

A quick read of the manual that came with the car pointed to it having a filter but will get that verified as perhaps one booklet covers different versions.

As you also said, I figured that a service alone does not good maintenance make - and I felt the dealer did the bare minimum, but perhaps that's standard. I wasn't allowed to speak to the actual mechanics who did the service - the person at reception took my small list of questions and said they'd pass them on. When I collected the car after the service I got a note back that said "suggest you do a fuel flush" and "have you ever changed the brake fluid?"

I suppose I'd better make friends quick with a local garage who can look after the basics. So far I've got a bottle of Wynns diesel system clean so hopefully that will cover the fuel flush that the dealer recommended I do. But I have no idea if the brake fluid has ever been changed (I did tell the dealer I'd bought the car privately only two weeks beforehand). They didn't tell me if it was needed, or when or how often...

I'm loathe to return to the dealer. My questions were answered with more questions and I couldn't speak to the people who knew the answers.

*for info, my questions were about why this car needed one gear less than my previous (petrol) car on the same journey - so where I would before use 3rd gear, this car only seemed to be happy in 2nd, and so on. Peugeot said the car was in good condition, but it feels underpowered to me. The oil change did improve things a little, and they also recommended the fuel flush and asked me about brake fluid - and this then raised the question in this thread of what should I do and when, in terms of regular maintenance, beyond the regular services at the garage.
 

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Oil changes every 10k miles max regardless off what anyone else says or even peugeot says filters at same time

IF you have a DPF then the fluid will need topped up at any mileage between 80 and 120k miles depends on how you use the car centre display will warn when its low do not ignore the warning as that is what causes the DPF problems people have.
DPF if everything is working properly is maintanance free but system looks for a replacement every 100k miles if working correctly you can just TELL it it has a new one.
I think the poster here is getting confused between a DPF (diesel particulate filter) and an SCR (selective catalytic reduction).
The SCR system (if you have one fitted, which is very unlikely considering the age of the car), uses DEF (diesel exhaust fluid) which is a urea based solution that is injected onto the SCR (mechanical or air boost system typically). The main role of an SCR is to reduce NOx primarily.
Typical DEF is AdBlue, and you should have a separate tank for this fluid. I really doubt you'd have that in a 207 of this vintage.

One thing I'd recommend is driving the car as soon as it is started - low load or no load running is not good for any engine - on frosty mornings, it's better to have the car glass defrosted and ready to drive within a minute or two of starting the engine.

Poor oil control, slobber, and oil consumption are symptomatic of engines with worn rings etc. from low load conditions :(.

Also DPF's will become clogged if they do not get up to temperature - stop start driving is not that wonderful for them, a good half hour (or longer) drive in flowing traffic to get the vehicle up to running temperature and operating at that temperature with load on is best.

Also make sure coolant is anti-freeze protected.

Oil changes regularly are recommended too. If you are driving stop start, I'd say you might want to shorten the recommended oil change intervals; although I'd think there is a degree of conservatism built into the recommended intervals. It's up to yourself - inspection of oil condition and levels is recommended on a regular basis.

On another note good quality fuel is a requirement, as diesel is used to lubricate the injectors and fuel system. I'm presuming your car is the HDi version which is a high pressure common rail system. I had a 406 HDi that had bad fuelling practice at one stage - brought on engine warning lights and went into limp home mode on more than one occasion. Thankfully a change of fuel station eradicated those problems.

I hope this helps.
 

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I think the poster here is getting confused between a DPF (diesel particulate filter) and an SCR (selective catalytic reduction).
The SCR system (if you have one fitted, which is very unlikely considering the age of the car), uses DEF (diesel exhaust fluid) which is a urea based solution that is injected onto the SCR (mechanical or air boost system typically). The main role of an SCR is to reduce NOx primarily.
Typical DEF is AdBlue, and you should have a separate tank for this fluid. I really doubt you'd have that in a 207 of this vintage.

One thing I'd recommend is driving the car as soon as it is started - low load or no load running is not good for any engine - on frosty mornings, it's better to have the car glass defrosted and ready to drive within a minute or two of starting the engine.

Poor oil control, slobber, and oil consumption are symptomatic of engines with worn rings etc. from low load conditions :(.

Also DPF's will become clogged if they do not get up to temperature - stop start driving is not that wonderful for them, a good half hour (or longer) drive in flowing traffic to get the vehicle up to running temperature and operating at that temperature with load on
Peugeot dpf system DOES use fluid, but it's not an adblue (urea) system. Eloys fluid is added to the tank each time you put diesel in, so best to fill the tank as the same amount of fluid is added regardless of amount added.

Your biggest issue will be making sure the car gets regular good runs so the dpf gets the chance to clean itself (regen). Diesels with a dpf tend not to be suited to city driving.
 

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Peugeot dpf system DOES use fluid, but it's not an adblue (urea) system. Eloys fluid is added to the tank each time you put diesel in, so best to fill the tank as the same amount of fluid is added regardless of amount added.

Your biggest issue will be making sure the car gets regular good runs so the dpf gets the chance to clean itself (regen). Diesels with a dpf tend not to be suited to city driving.
Well I learn something new every day. It seems like another element of maintenance that is required on cars with DPF, that owners of other competitive products won't have to manage.

For my information, can anyone shed some light on what the Eloys fluid brings to the party?
 

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Well I learn something new every day. It seems like another element of maintenance that is required on cars with DPF, that owners of other competitive products won't have to manage.

For my information, can anyone shed some light on what the Eloys fluid brings to the party?
It makes Peugeot more money!
 

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In all seriousness, my understanding is this. Each time you open the fuel cap a bit of fluid is injected into the tank. So if you fill 20l at a time you will use the fluid 3 times quicker than if you fill. The cap sensor is known to give issues. There is no easy way to check the fluid. Nor is it easy to refill. You need the right software to reset the level of fluid. You still need to be on a long run to activate a regen. The only benefit to the eloys system that I know of is there are no issues with interrupting a regen, where other systems have a tendency to dump diesel in with the oil.
 

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Of course :D - I meant from a technical perspective, as to what it does......
The trapped soot needs to be burned off by a regen. The natural combustion temperature of said soot is 550°C. The eloys reduces the combustion temperature (by witchcraft or something) to 450°C. So it's just a way to make the process easier, where most manufacturers just have a way to get the dpf up to the required temp.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I think the poster here is getting confused between a DPF (diesel particulate filter) and an SCR (selective catalytic reduction).
The SCR system (if you have one fitted, which is very unlikely considering the age of the car), uses DEF (diesel exhaust fluid) which is a urea based solution that is injected onto the SCR (mechanical or air boost system typically). The main role of an SCR is to reduce NOx primarily.
Typical DEF is AdBlue, and you should have a separate tank for this fluid. I really doubt you'd have that in a 207 of this vintage.

One thing I'd recommend is driving the car as soon as it is started - low load or no load running is not good for any engine - on frosty mornings, it's better to have the car glass defrosted and ready to drive within a minute or two of starting the engine.

Poor oil control, slobber, and oil consumption are symptomatic of engines with worn rings etc. from low load conditions :(.

Also DPF's will become clogged if they do not get up to temperature - stop start driving is not that wonderful for them, a good half hour (or longer) drive in flowing traffic to get the vehicle up to running temperature and operating at that temperature with load on is best.

Also make sure coolant is anti-freeze protected.

Oil changes regularly are recommended too. If you are driving stop start, I'd say you might want to shorten the recommended oil change intervals; although I'd think there is a degree of conservatism built into the recommended intervals. It's up to yourself - inspection of oil condition and levels is recommended on a regular basis.

On another note good quality fuel is a requirement, as diesel is used to lubricate the injectors and fuel system. I'm presuming your car is the HDi version which is a high pressure common rail system. I had a 406 HDi that had bad fuelling practice at one stage - brought on engine warning lights and went into limp home mode on more than one occasion. Thankfully a change of fuel station eradicated those problems.

I hope this helps.
I appreciate your response. I must investigate more about the DPF (or lack of), I was quite sure that I read in the manual that it had some form of filter for cleaner emissions, but I must dig that out again and have a proper look. Definitely there is no separate tank for Adblue so no SCR presumably. I will take on board your suggestions on premium fuel and more frequent oil changes.
Thank you so much for your very helpful reply!
 

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Hi mate,

Welcome to the forum. Lots of great info above, but I would add the following:

Regular tyre pressure checks
Regular engine oil level checks
Regular checks of coolant

As my dad taught me, tyres, oil and water, top up as needed.

A couple of things you could easily DIY (which will do no harm and will certainly settle your nerves) are air filter, and cabin filter (if fitted). Get yourself on GSF car parts, Euro Car Parts etc and get them, neither should be expensive or difficult to replace.

Finally, take a look at how much brake pad material is around. Wouldn't worry too much if you can't, but always a good spot when buying a car so you can estimate when you might need to get them replaced - especially if the car hasn't been supplied with much history.

Happy motoring.

Roger
 

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As regards gearbox oil normally it get replaced at a clutch change. I check mine each year but only for my only mind. Brake fluid I normally go by feel of the brakes and the colour in the fluid container if it's dark it needs replacing

Air filter pollen filter and fuel filter I do every 2 years no matter what the mileage

Oil and filter I do every 6k



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