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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've never seen so much choice in tyres in one vehicle.
I understand the M&S with grip control, but what is the purpose of the 19" narrow tyre?.
Scandinavian regions with studded tyres?.
What is ULLR?.
I suspect we won't have such choice.
 

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I've never seen so much choice in tyres in one vehicle.

I understand the M&S with grip control, but what is the purpose of the 19" narrow tyre?.

Scandinavian regions with studded tyres?.

What is ULLR?.

I suspect we won't have such choice.


This is a pic of the UK brochure showing 6 different wheels but I also note that narrow and tall tyres are available to increase efficiency.



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The Washington wheel looks to have the same aspect ratio tyre in the pic.
No indication of a specific fuel saving either.
ULLR? What does that stand for?.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

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Perhaps ULLR means "Ultra Low - Low Resistance". I've tried googling it but it just refers you to the Dunlop tyres and doesn't give an explanation
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Perhaps ULLR means "Ultra Low - Low Resistance". I've tried googling it but it just refers you to the Dunlop tyres and doesn't give an explanation
It's a bit odd that Peugeot seem to think it's common knowledge.
Maybe they think it looks like impressive new tyre tech.
Ask the salesman....:lol:
 

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The narrow 19" have less contact with the tarmac = less friction = fuel efficiency and less noice than wider tires.
I've only just noticed this. Maybe I have made a mistake in opting for the 19" Wellington's over the standard 18" Detroit's.

What I would like to know (which obviously means I have a very keen interest) is to find out by how much the Wellington's are less capable of grip; be that in emergency stopping or generally road holding.
If anyone has seen any links or information I'd be happy to go dig deeper.
Thanks.

EDITED: There's a good explanation in the values of 'taller & thinner' tyres here:- http://www.moderntiredealer.com/article/312194/the-skinny-on-tall-thin-tires
I now have a greater understanding on the science on the 'taller & narrower tyres.
From a visual point of view it is easy to believe these tyres have less grip, whereas from a scientific view it is quite the opposite:- There is less aquaplaning and thus greater wet grip, less rolling for a firmer ride and better control, which in turn creates a better energy efficiency and less road noise.
All of a sudden I feel a lot happier with my choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I've read that Michelin is currently the only one offering 205/55R19 tires for SUVs, but that they're going to get more common and by the end of the year we should see them from other vendors as well.

This is how they look under the 3008:
https://youtu.be/tvVzQmkJ5ZM
They are the ones I'd prefer for ride comfort, economy and visually filling the wheel arch.:thumb:
 

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There is less aquaplaning and thus greater wet grip, less rolling for a firmer ride and better control, which in turn creates a better energy efficiency and less road noise.
True, also a thin tire will have better grip in snow. Just look at how different the tires on rally cars are on snow and tarmac.

The cons are that it's not as good in braking and high speed cornering on dry tarmac (because it has less friction) compared to wider tires. But how often are you going to drive like Hamilton on your way to work :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The 205/55/19 is a high profile tyre which should give a better ride I would think.......not as much slap bang.
 

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I had misfortune to get sidewall puncture while over in Newcastle.
thought it would be easy to get replacement tyre but tried 2 tyre centres both had no continentals in stock.
I had to drive home that day and no possibility of 100 miles on space saver.
i eventually found shop with one unbranded tyre with same spec.to get me home.
called in local kwik fit yesterday and they informed only 4 of these tyres in UK.
So one ordered to fit Wednesday.
probably around 150. fitted.
continental contisport contact 5
235/50 V19.
 

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I've never seen so much choice in tyres in one vehicle.
I understand the M&S with grip control, but what is the purpose of the 19" narrow tyre?.
Scandinavian regions with studded tyres?.
What is ULLR?.
I suspect we won't have such choice.
I think I may have sussed this.

ULLR is a Norse god of snow apparently. So I think Dunlop are using this as a marketing name that denotes these are SNOW TIRES (winter).
We have some Norwegian chaps on here, maybe they can enlighten?

Grumpy
 

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We have some Norwegian chaps on here, maybe they can enlighten?
I've never heard of the term ULLR. It's not something I look for when I buy winter tires. I only purchase the best studless tires money can buy. I don't even get any relevant hits in Norwegian when I google Dunlup ULLR.

The Grip Control tires are M+S tires, but they are not accepted as winter tires in Norway so we have to use them as summer tires.

The best winter tires in the Nordic region* (last winter) was:
Studs.
Continental IceContact 2
Nokian Hakkapeliitta 8
Bridgestone Noranza 001

Studless.
Continental ContiVikingContact 6
Nokian Hakkapeliitta R2
Goodyear Ultra Grip Ice 2

As far as I know, none of them are called ULLR.

* tested by NAF/Motor (Norway), Aftonbladet and Auto Motor och Sport (Sweden), Tekniikan Mailma (Finland) and Auto Revue (Russia)
 

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:lol: Now I learned something new about norse mythology. It seems that the reference to the Ski God Ull is something they use in eastern parts of Europe. The links I found was also eastern European. I cannot find that Goodyear-tire in the Nordic test, so I guess it's not considered good enough for the Nordic climate compared to the testet Goodyear Ultra Grip Ice 2.
 
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