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Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks,

Some advise around water pump and timer belt....

My 307 1.4L 16V had its timer belt and water pump done at 48500 miles in 2012....I am on 96500 miles now....

Do I need to get the timer belt done anytime soon ? Car is driving fine without any faults or wierd noises as of now....

If yes anyone in ROI know approx cost for doing it ?

Cheers

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I believe the official interval for replaing the timing belt is around 100 - 120 thousand miles or 10 years which ever is the sooner but that can change with different engines.

The original replacement may have had nothing to do with the timing belt requiring a replacement. It is recommended that it is replaced everytime it is removed from the engine regardles of mileage or age so it may have been replaced due to a failed water pump, tensioner or pulley just to name a couple of reasons.

I'd be looking to replace between 70k to 80k if it was mine. My 2.0 hdi 307 still had the original belt when I bought it with 108k on the clock. I eventually got round to replacing it after I had the car a couple of months when the car had 120k on the clock. Every time I drove the car was a little scary as I was worried it might just decide 'today is the day i'm gonna snap'.

The cars done 48k since the last replacement so I personally wouldn't be too worried about it. Based on the annual mileage of just shy of 10k a year it should be good for around two or three more years before and early replacement is done.

All this is based on the recommended replacement interval for the two diesel 307's I've owned. Yours may be different depending on if it's petrol or diesel and the engine type.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for a elaborate reply...mine is 1.4 petrol....

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Bought my son a 2007 1.4 petrol 207 last July for my son. It had well over 100k on the clock with no record of the belt being changed BUT the service history had a recommendation that it should be changed after the previous owner took it for a service at around 80k. No similar recommendation at the 40-50k mark. The car did come with a pretty comprehensive service history so I reckon the belt was original when I changed it.

I replaced the belt the following weekend with my son assisting. I would still think you would be good for another 2 or three years based on the average mileage the car has done over the pat 5 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Bought my son a 2007 1.4 petrol 207 last July for my son. It had well over 100k on the clock with no record of the belt being changed BUT the service history had a recommendation that it should be changed after the previous owner took it for a service at around 80k. No similar recommendation at the 40-50k mark. The car did come with a pretty comprehensive service history so I reckon the belt was original when I changed it.

I replaced the belt the following weekend with my son assisting. I would still think you would be good for another 2 or three years based on the average mileage the car has done over the pat 5 years.

Apologies but its 48k miles=80k kms.........is the official recommendation for petrol not 80k km ?? Based on the below link...


http://www.peugeotlogic.com/workshop/base/workshop.htm


However below link says its 10 years and also manual says its at 80k miles :)........

http://www.mytimingbelt.com/Results.aspx?ModelId=30


can anyone enlighten me please ... thanks in advance !
 

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I own 307 2005 1.6 petrol

I have the car only about 6 months, the previous 1st owner replaced the belt 3 TIMES!:eek: means each 3 years or in average each 31k_Km - today the car reach only to 98k_ Km. I call to the formal Peugeot garage of 1st owner and they told me to replace timing belt each 90k_Km or 3 years of service (Whichever comes first) - but I will replace each 5 years. I read of several cases which the belt snap after about 6 years (the mileage is less important).
In my case I afraid of my coolant pump because it yet has not been replaced :confused: - In the coming 1.5 years I probably will replace it with the timing belt despite that I have a pending error code P1340 (Camshaft Position Sensor B Circuit Malfunction) my average petrol fuel consumption is 8.3Km per 1 liter - I assume that fuel consumption will be improved in small levels after replacing my belt (because P1340).
I also own ford focus and replace timing belt each 5 years (according to Ford recommendation, again the recommended replacement millage is too long and is not the dominant decision because the belt aging is affected from several parameters such as the belt tension level after last replacement and the temp. mostly while your car is rest outdoor...
My next car will be only chain timing - belt is a bone in the throat :D
So whether you have a decision?
 

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Apologies but its 48k miles=80k kms.........is the official recommendation for petrol not 80k km ?? Based on the below link...


Peugeot Workshop Information


However below link says its 10 years and also manual says its at 80k miles :)........

Peugeot 307 Timing Belt / Cambelt Change Intervals | MyTimingBelt.com


can anyone enlighten me please ... thanks in advance !

Which is why I said my response was based on the recommendations I had received for my two diesels and that these recommendations could be different dependant on the engine - or perhaps you missed reading that bit. I only research heavily the cars I own as they are the only real important cas to me. As far as the 207 goes. There was nothing in the history suggesting the belt had already been replaced and at over 100k miles for any car with a timing belt it was definitely due. It was replaced as a precaution. If there had been a record of a previous change I would have taken that into consideration.

The original post only said it was a 1.4 litre engine not whether it was petrol or diesel - that came after my first rsponse. Haynes manuals can give advice on timing belt changes that are a lot more frequent than the manufacturers. I'm guessing this could be partly to avoid an possibility of someone trying to sue them in the event of someone trying to get compensation from them saying their timing belt snapped at x number of miles and they didn't get it changed because the haynes manual said it wasn't necessary at the time it snapped. The second link ties in with the info I discovered when I did my own research and with the service books supplied by Peugeot wheras the first link ties in very closely with the numbers published in the haynes manuals.

It is down to the owner of the car wether to rely on the sometimes overly long service interval supplied by the manufacturer, a more cautious approach as I take or a very cautious where you bring the service interval right down.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Which is why I said my response was based on the recommendations I had received for my two diesels and that these recommendations could be different dependant on the engine - or perhaps you missed reading that bit. I only research heavily the cars I own as they are the only real important cas to me. As far as the 207 goes. There was nothing in the history suggesting the belt had already been replaced and at over 100k miles for any car with a timing belt it was definitely due. It was replaced as a precaution. If there had been a record of a previous change I would have taken that into consideration.

The original post only said it was a 1.4 litre engine not whether it was petrol or diesel - that came after my first rsponse. Haynes manuals can give advice on timing belt changes that are a lot more frequent than the manufacturers. I'm guessing this could be partly to avoid an possibility of someone trying to sue them in the event of someone trying to get compensation from them saying their timing belt snapped at x number of miles and they didn't get it changed because the haynes manual said it wasn't necessary at the time it snapped. The second link ties in with the info I discovered when I did my own research and with the service books supplied by Peugeot wheras the first link ties in very closely with the numbers published in the haynes manuals.

It is down to the owner of the car wether to rely on the sometimes overly long service interval supplied by the manufacturer, a more cautious approach as I take or a very cautious where you bring the service interval right down.
Thanks i was never questioning ur comment...i think first service might have been done as a precaution ..

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Reluctor Plate on the 2.0 HDI Timing Belt ???

Chaps,
I've had a mechanic turn down the job of replacing the timing belt and water pump because of a 'reluctor plate' and tools required to do the job???

Can anyone clarify what he means as I have no idea??

regards
Rich
 

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Chaps,
I've had a mechanic turn down the job of replacing the timing belt and water pump because of a 'reluctor plate' and tools required to do the job???

Can anyone clarify what he means as I have no idea??

regards
Rich
I did the timing belt on my 307 2.0l HDI 90 and my sons 1.4 petrol 207 on the road outside my house with a basic but reasonably comprehensive toolkit and a Haynes manual. I'd guess the mechanic doesn't know what is involved and is bullsh*****g you.

A reluctor plate or reluctor ring is used to send signals back to an ecu via a sensor. You find reluctor rings on wheel hubs for the ABS and some cars have a reluctor plate for the cam or crankshaft sensors. No reluctor anything is involved in replacing a timing belt or water pump on a 2.0 HDI that I'm aware of. All you need to ensure is that the cranshaft and camshaft(s) are pinned before removing the old and fitting a new belt to ensure the timing is correct. You would be best served taking the car to someone who knows what they are doing.
 

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Rich, the RHR engine has a timing belt and chain, maybe this is what is bothering him. There isn't a reluctor "plate" for the cam or crankshaft assemblies, but there may be a sensor for the timing etc.

As storeman said, it can be done without any specialist tooling. Any mechanic worth their weight in salt would know this, and would have access to the correct tools or be able to replace a belt and pump using what he has at his disposal.

At least he's telling you that he's reluctant to do it, rather than doing it without any confidence and then making a balls of it.
 

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I best stay well clear .... I'm considering getting Peugeot Menston to fit the new kit at £285 inclusive. At least then there's some guarantee.
cheers
Rich
 

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I am finding the timing belt pretty much idiot proof on these pugs. Provided you lock the cams and crankshaft and tension correctly you can't really go wrong. Getting the water pump out is the hardest bit, mine doesn't want to die, so far it's resisted a 4lb lump, so it'sgoing to be long chisel out to break it off.
 
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