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Discussion Starter #1
There is a steady current drain when the ignition is turned off. it. I measured the current between the battery and the two red leads that join the positive terminal. There is a steady drain of about 60ma, but there are not lights showing. Every 15 hours nearly 1AH is consumed, with 750 hours leading to a flat bettery (50AH).

Pulling out all the fuses 1 - 16 and the shunt removed the drain, with about 35 ma with the shunt in place.

What can I disconnect to eliminate the drain, and what would be causing it. It is definitely some equipment and not "leakage".

I would like to turn off the alarm (already off with the special key under the bonnet) and we couild forgo the key pad and the central loking.

My wife only does 10 miles a week of which 5 is at night.

Thanks

Lawrence
 

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There is a steady current drain when the ignition is turned off. it. I measured the current between the battery and the two red leads that join the positive terminal. There is a steady drain of about 60ma, but there are not lights showing. Every 15 hours nearly 1AH is consumed, with 750 hours leading to a flat bettery (50AH).

Pulling out all the fuses 1 - 16 and the shunt removed the drain, with about 35 ma with the shunt in place.

What can I disconnect to eliminate the drain, and what would be causing it. It is definitely some equipment and not "leakage".

I would like to turn off the alarm (already off with the special key under the bonnet) and we couild forgo the key pad and the central loking.

My wife only does 10 miles a week of which 5 is at night.

Thanks

Lawrence
i would say that sounds normal to me
if only driving 10 miles a week then when you add up all the expenses (fuel, tax, mot, servicing, repairs, insurance) would it not be cheaper to get a taxi
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I agree, but she needs it for holidays etc.

If that drain is usual how do cars fare on forecourts, garages , airports etc.

Any ideas what I could do?

Thanks

Lawrence
 

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most car sales places either have a battery charger or let cars idle for a bit every so often, airports cars are there for a week or 2 normally
 

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i take it from what you have posted that your battery is going flat if so then have it tested and also the alternator, cold weather kills batteries and also batteries dont live forever
 

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-The car needs to supply some current to the electronicswhen turned off, If nothing but the remote locking receiver is powered up then 60ma is still not a huge consumption. Today's cars are no different to most modern entertainment electronics in that they don't get 'switched off', merely go into standby modeso they can accept and recognise incomming signals.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I realise that the electronics systems have to be supplied, but how can I turn them off?

I've pulled the radio fuse, she does not have a key fob and we don't want the alarm. How can I turn them off and still start the car when we need to?


Can I pull a connector or something?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yes, a steady drain of 60 Ma will flatten the battery:

50 / (60 / 1000) = 833 hours for a 50AH battery

833 hours is 5 weeks - rubbish!

And of course if it is cold weather, this will be less - and that is totally flat.

Surely this is a design flaw?

Lawrence
 

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You have a choice of three measures:

Disconnect the battery when not in use. This is a bit of a pain, because of the precautions needed with Peugeots. Doors closed, bonnet open, switch off through driver's window, so is only practical if the car is garaged.

Put the battery on a trickle charger say once a week. Needs to be near to a power point. If you use a good quality charger, there is no need to disconnect the battery, and you can leave it on overnight.

Give the car a good drive once a week, to let the alternator put back what has been taken out.

If you want to know what is drawing the current, replace the fuses one-by-one, measuring each time. If you find the bulk is taken by circuit(s) you can entirely do without (refer to the handbook for fuse function), you could leave the relevant fuse(s) out, but it is unlikely to be that simple.
 

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There is a 4th & 5th choice - buy a battery with a higher capacity or to totally eliminate any drain, buy a car without ECU's, remote locking, radio with a memory, alarm or any other device requiring a permanent electrical supply to function
 

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But the drain ceased when the fuses and shunt were pulled. I don't think the alternator connection to the battery is fused, is it?
Maybe not But the fact remains you have a Car with an Ecu and the Memory for the Radio to consider Unless you go for an Isolator switch there will always be a current draw

the downside of the Isolator will be no central locking alarm radio memory clock memory Mileage would default to KPH language would be in French
I would tend to fit the bigger amperage battery if five weeks sending you're battery flat is a worry Unless you like sitting in the car doing the default settings alterations every time you start the car up

the Other Option would involve a small Solar Panel when in daylight it would constantly trickle charge the battery
As an aside your Amperage equation falls over due to the fact that at 12.5 volts the amps is not the same as at 11.9 volts If I remember enough of the Maths
 

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Discussion Starter #15
bringing it full circle, pulling the fuses is what I have done.

the battery is new, and fully charged, and the alternator doesn't matter in this discussion if the car is not used.

I just think it is bad design, and annoying. Doesn't anyone know what I can do?

Lawrence
 

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The alternator COULD matter if the diodes were defective. The diodes are always connected to the battery, and if one or more of them were to conduct reverse current the battery would run down, irrespective of whether the car is used or not, but your test has proved that that is not the cause.

I think you've already been told what you can do. There is no magic wand to make the issue go away. It is the way cars are now made.
 

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How can it be a bad design?

The car is fitted with several items that require a constant electrical supply to give the majority of owners the comfort, convenience, security and safety they expect from a modern vehicle. What would be bad design would be to build the car that stopped these items from supplying the expectations of the majority of the customers.

I don't know anyone personally who buys a car to leave it sitting idle for five weeks or longer at a time. Fitting a larger capacity battery or as others have suggested, fitting a solar trickle charger to help combat the drain or even once a week simply starting the car and letting it tick over for a short time would all help prevent a flat battery. I fail to see how simply running the car once a week can be a less desirable workaround than pulling the fuses. Come to think of it, surely removing the positive battery lead would be easier than pulling several fuses.

Do you have a mobile phone of any kind? The chances are that you do but I bet you're not on a forum for the phone complaining that if you don't use your phone for a few days it's battery drains meaning you have to charge it up when you want to use it. Same thing in a different context.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for your help. It's not the alternator, that's only 1MA at most. My phone? does not drain the battery when off.

I had hoped that you guys might know something special. I'll probably fit a trailing connector with a magnetic snatch to a trickle charger, or a relay with a lamp in the cockpit on the two red wires at the front.

Pity though, I would have liked an elegant solution with less facilities.

Lawrence
 

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I didn't say wthe phone battery would drain if switched off, I said if you didn't use it for a few days the battery would drain. A big difference in the two statements.

You are complaining the battery on the car drains if the car isn't used for five weeks. The car isn't 'switched off', it's not running but like a phone it needs power to keep things like memory, time etc. The phone would drain it's battery in days rather than weeks and you would accept that but somehow the same principle with the car is for you unthinkable.

IMHO it's not a bad design on the car, it's a bad way of using the car (or not using it to be correct) that is the issue. Don't blame the car, blame the cause of the issue. Not using a car can be as bad if not worse than hammering it all the time. Underuse of cars caused problems long ago before things like ecu's and remains the same today. An old car with extremely low mileage is as risky to buy as a newish car with very high mileage.
 
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