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Discussion Starter #1
So my back window was not opening but I could hear the motor working fine, assumed it was a cable issue so I took off the door panel for a look.
Fairly straightforward getting the door panel off, just follow the numbers in the pic, and I just popped out the panel by gradually levering the panel off around the edges,
the clips then came out fairly easily without a custom tool. I took the second pic with a grain of salt and just popped the handle cover out gently.











The cable was indeed broken and fairly rusted too. I only recently bought the car so it must have been broken for a while beforehand by the looks of it.
The regulator cable should be going around the red triangle I drew in the image, the green line is the track that the carriage moves up and down on, and the
purple circles are the rivets that have to be drilled out to remove the regulator.
I got a bit angry with the foam covering, had to reseal it with duct tape when finished.




At this stage I was trying to decide whether to buy a new regulator or take the cheap option and just get a repair kit. I'm a cheap-ass so I went for the repair kit. Got one on Amazon for €13.
It included a (plastic) carriage, a cable, covers, and a pulley that connects to the motor (the leftmost blue circle).To get the regulator out I removed all the three rubber window seals (they pop out fairly easily),
dropped the window down as far as it would go, and removed the two torques holding the glass to the carriage.

The glass then slides out the top fairly easily, just straight up, and tilt the top slightly outwards. Drill out the two rivets mentioned above and the track pops out.





Reassembling the regulator is fairly easy. The way I did it was to thread the cable around the tops of the two smaller oval pulleys (see 2nd post for a pic) and pop the cable covers into the carriage but not into the housing. Next, thread the cables around the new drive pulley that came with the kit and line it all up to make sure the windings looks right.. Think I done about 1 1/2 turns on top and bottom. Then just pop the pulley into the housing to keep the cable windings in place. You can then release the cable from the oval pulleys on the carriage and reassemble the rest without the cable sprawling everywhere.

Note: I aligned the 'knob' (the part that attaches to the carriage) in the cable roughly in the centre of the track so as to have enough cable at each end for movement up and down the track.

Get the cable around the final two pulleys by using the little oval shape on top of the pulley to help guide the cable down into place. There's a groove in it so you just thread the oval pulley and feed the cable around (attaching it to the carriage helps) and it automatically threads down into the lower/larger part of the pulley. (With a bit of gentle pressure downwards on the cable to help it down on to the lower track). This can be necessary if the edges of the carriage are so close to the pulley.

It gets a bit tight for the second/final pulley (because of the springs) so just pop out the cable cover nearest the final pulley, and thread the oval pulley again and pop the cable cover back into it's groove.
Then just move/slide the carriage, and the cable will thread itself down into the lower pulley. Seems to be a 4 picture limit so I'll an a pic of this underneath I did this wrong several (four I think!) times. In the image above it's WRONG! The main drive and housing are upside-down. I repeated and thought I had it right... installed it into the car... and the main drive housing was out of place. I had the cable covers reversed, the slightly longer cable with the extra covering has to go on top. Third time, and I forgot to reverse the carriage again! It was getting easier to do it by then.


Basically the longer cable cover should be at the top when it's installed, and make sure nothing is upside-down or backwards. It's easy to forget since you need to flip the drive housing around to fit the cable to the carriage after you wrap the drive pulley. You just really need to visualise where all the parts go.
Reinstalling is easy, once you've got a rivet gun, although I had to remove mine again and replace the carriage with the one supplied in the repair kit, because the old carriage kept popping off its knob. I didn't like replacing a lovely metal original carriage with a cheap plastic one but it had to be done, it's probably what caused the problem in the first place: knob detaches from carriage, window drops, knob gets driven up further than it's supposed to, by person pressing window button repeatedly, knob gets caught somewhere, cable frays and breaks.



So, I know I probably missed some stuff here, like which screws to remove, and grease the cable, cleaning inside the door etc, but most of it it straight forward. My biggest worry was probably 'don't break the glass'! It gets a bit scary when it's stuck between either side of the metal door and your arms are getting tired holding it! I've seen tutorials where they tell you to rotate the glass when removing it, but that's not the case here.. just lift it straight up.

I haven't really done any guides before, I'm still fairly new here but I thought I'd post something (hopefully) helpful instead of just asking people for help all the time! Let me know if this makes sense, or if it's just gibberish!
 

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Great guide very useful to people having a go for the first time as the rear doors seem to suffer with this problem, if someone isn't that confident with rewinding the cables etc you can spend abit more about £30-£40 and get a replacement from gsf car parts and its a bolt on no rivets, dealers have reportedly been quoting £400 for this job .
 

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I did one on my first 407. Easy enough, sliced my hands bits obviously. Wouldn't be a job on a Peugeot if there wasn't some claret dripping all over the place.

I didn't remove the glass though, plus my replacement reg was a bolt in.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Great guide very useful to people having a go for the first time as the rear doors seem to suffer with this problem, if someone isn't that confident with rewinding the cables etc you can spend abit more about £30-£40 and get a replacement from gsf car parts and its a bolt on no rivets, dealers have reportedly been quoting £400 for this job .

£400, holy crap! I paid €450 for my whole car., with a timing belt kit included. lol
Rewinding the cable is fairly easy to be honest, seems easier than a lot of the double track regulators with the 'x' shape I seen floating around on the interwebs. But it's all the same really once you take it into the kitchen to work on it.


I did one on my first 407. Easy enough, sliced my hands bits obviously. Wouldn't be a job on a Peugeot if there wasn't some claret dripping all over the place.

I didn't remove the glass though, plus my replacement reg was a bolt in.
I got away without any cuts but there was some sharpness in there that I narrowly avoided. I used to work in a glass factory so I've got a careful sense when touching anything!

I HAD to remove the glass and rubbers on mine, since the previous owner had glued the window to the seals with a slip of wood and covered it with some kind of blue goopy gluey chewing gum stuff. It was a pita to get it all off. :mad:

My plan is always to spend as little as possible and buy tools instead, if possible, so I bought a rivet gun on ebay for about €6. There's something really satisfying about using a rived gun too..
 
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