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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Got one side off, decided to keep cranking the puller until the drum came off. I am going to do the same with the other side. I am not sure if it knackered the wheel cylinder but it was leaking. In the first photo, you can see there are no pins, they broke under the strain of the puller. I suppose a garage would do the same to get them off, no one is going to start taking the exhaust of, then the heat shield, it would take half a day to do the brakes.

The other thing I noticed is the handbrake lever was sized, I am pretty sure that is supposed to move. Also the handbrake lever is riveted to the shoe, it is not designed to be taken off. But on the other brake shoe, it has a clip on the part that goes above the ratchet clip, that is designed to be removed. That means the shoes I got are no good, which gives you some idea of how many variations there are out there, and I got mine from Allparts who supposedly know what the correct shoes are when you give them your reg.

As I am going to have to bleed the brakes, how much brake fluid do I need to buy.

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Update.

What could go wrong with a simple job like changing brake shoes, has more or less gone wrong. 1 drum sized on, 1 cylinder leaking, 1 drum bearing knackered. So the whole bloody lot needed renewing. Even though I had to buy a few extras, puller, new cylinders and drums, I still think I saved a few quid. :)
 

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Good on ya mate..

It's an absolute pita at the time, but you have learnt heap loads !!
and earnt the kudos of a job well done !

I've been away battling with a welder in the pouring rain, as the MOT guy went a poking about in places he shouldn't have been a pokin' !
It took *f.o.r.e.v.e.r* but I have learnt loads, and it'll get easier and quicker next time round..
It cost £6 in total (£2 for the wire, and £4 for petrol for the generator...to run it till 5am grinding away from home, so as not to annoy the neighbours.)

Well done to you you John !

Liam
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Good on ya mate..

It's an absolute pita at the time, but you have learnt heap loads !!
and earnt the kudos of a job well done !

I've been away battling with a welder in the pouring rain, as the MOT guy went a poking about in places he shouldn't have been a pokin' !
It took *f.o.r.e.v.e.r* but I have learnt loads, and it'll get easier and quicker next time round..
It cost £6 in total (£2 for the wire, and £4 for petrol for the generator...to run it till 5am grinding away from home, so as not to annoy the neighbours.)

Well done to you you John !

Liam
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Thanks Liam, I certainly have learnt loads. I have changed a few rear brakes on other cars without any problem, but the 106 drum brakes were by far the worst to get to grips with as you can't really adjust them in the normal way.

I am not finished yet, I have been trying to put a few miles on the clock to bed the brakes in and I think I need to tighten the axle nuts a bit more, another half or 3 quarter turn should do it.

I noticed the front caliper on the drivers side was sticking when I was replacing the discs, I thought it might not be an issue at the time, but it looks like I have to replace the caliper on that side. I could rebuild it which would be a lot cheaper, but it all takes time. So off to the auto shop on Monday to get a new caliper.

Today I noticed there is a bit of play in the steering wheel, which wasn't there before. That's another job that needs doing.

PS; good luck with the welding.
 

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Thanks Liam, I certainly have learnt loads. I have changed a few rear brakes on other cars without any problem, but the 106 drum brakes were by far the worst to get to grips with as you can't really adjust them in the normal way.

I am not finished yet, I have been trying to put a few miles on the clock to bed the brakes in and I think I need to tighten the axle nuts a bit more, another half or 3 quarter turn should do it.

I noticed the front caliper on the drivers side was sticking when I was replacing the discs, I thought it might not be an issue at the time, but it looks like I have to replace the caliper on that side. I could rebuild it which would be a lot cheaper, but it all takes time. So off to the auto shop on Monday to get a new caliper.

Today I noticed there is a bit of play in the steering wheel, which wasn't there before. That's another job that needs doing.

PS; good luck with the welding.
Cheers
when I replace my back brakes, I got the ready assemled brake shoe kit... (about £50?) and it just fitted straight on ..
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My calipers, and pistons stick.
..in fact I have just released one side, a few days back, (in situ) for the mot..
Trying high temp pfte spray, & high temp silicone spray, as a lube, this time..
and got to remind myself to do them again in 6 mths this time round.
(I tried red grease but the protective boot has gone , and it just washes away)

Forward and onward :)
"gentlemen we can rebuild him" ... the $6 million car :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Cheers
when I replace my back brakes, I got the ready assemled brake shoe kit... (about £50?) and it just fitted straight on ..
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My calipers, and pistons stick.
..in fact I have just released one side, a few days back, (in situ) for the mot..
Trying high temp pfte spray, & high temp silicone spray, as a lube, this time..
and got to remind myself to do them again in 6 mths this time round.
(I tried red grease but the protective boot has gone , and it just washes away)

Forward and onward :)
"gentlemen we can rebuild him" ... the $6 million car :)
When I pushed the pistons back to fit the shoes, one side wouldn't go back and I was using a piston tool that was designed for the job. I had to give it some wellie to drive the piston back, I think it has stayed stuck since then. The brakes felt spongy after doing this, even though I had not done anything to the brake pipes.

To try to solve this problem for the moment, I can fix it properly later. I am going to remove the caliper and put my foot on the brake, very lightly, to see if I can get the piston to move out a few mm, then push it back by in. I'll do that a few times while applying some silicone.
 

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Good on ya mate..

It's an absolute pita at the time, but you have learnt heap loads !!
and earnt the kudos of a job well done !

I've been away battling with a welder in the pouring rain, as the MOT guy went a poking about in places he shouldn't have been a pokin' !
It took *f.o.r.e.v.e.r* but I have learnt loads, and it'll get easier and quicker next time round..
It cost £6 in total (£2 for the wire, and £4 for petrol for the generator...to run it till 5am grinding away from home, so as not to annoy the neighbours.)

Well done to you you John !

Liam
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View attachment 77306
I'm not quite sure what needed welding, but if the mot tester found rust anywhere that affected the security of the suspension, steering, braking system, seat belts or seats, then it needed fixing.

Roger.
 

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I'm not quite sure what needed welding, but if the mot tester found rust anywhere that affected the security of the suspension, steering, braking system, seat belts or seats, then it needed fixing.

Roger.
and fixed it was...
so good , infact , that he gave me two mots , one for next year as well ;)
liam
 

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Discussion Starter #9
and fixed it was...
so good , infact , that he gave me two mots , one for next year as well ;)
liam
I would have thought after seeing the excellent work you done, he should give you a lifetime MOT, as that's one job that will never need doing again.

I bought 2 new front calipers today, the old calipers were really knackered with rust. They had been on there for 18 years so they had to go. The transformation was amazing, I can stop on a sixpence now. So that's everything brake wise done now. New discs, drums, bearings, cylinders, calipers, shoes and pads.

Then I bled the entire system with my newfangled Sealey brake bleeder. The price is a bit of a rip off, then again, I reckon it would cost 50 quid to get the brakes bled in a garage, so I saved 3 quid. :eek:

Now that I see how it works, it would be very easy to make one. You don't really need a gauge, any Hozelock pressure sprayer would do the same job for less than half the price. You can buy various caps designed for pressure brake bleeders, then all you have to do is connect it to your Hozelock sprayer, and away you go.:thumb:
 

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I would have thought after seeing the excellent work you done, he should give you a lifetime MOT, as that's one job that will never need doing again.

I bought 2 new front calipers today, the old calipers were really knackered with rust. They had been on there for 18 years so they had to go. The transformation was amazing, I can stop on a sixpence now. So that's everything brake wise done now. New discs, drums, bearings, cylinders, calipers, shoes and pads.

Then I bled the entire system with my newfangled Sealey brake bleeder. The price is a bit of a rip off, then again, I reckon it would cost 50 quid to get the brakes bled in a garage, so I saved 3 quid. :eek:

Now that I see how it works, it would be very easy to make one. You don't really need a gauge, any Hozelock pressure sprayer would do the same job for less than half the price. You can buy various caps designed for pressure brake bleeders, then all you have to do is connect it to your Hozelock sprayer, and away you go.:thumb:
thanks :) next job is to weld him into his mot cabinet :)

That's interesting about the calipers... I've never swapped any, but mine do look a bit pitted and ropey tbh...

The brake bleeding is something I don't like doing tbh..
but the nipples have never snapped, as of yet... so maybe an unfounded fear...
Just think next time, it'll cost nothing...saving £50 every time you use it...on any car for the future ...£££ savings !


When I swapped the back axle the brakes were really bad...foot to floor time ..
I read somewhere to loosen the nipples a bit put a hose on them , and put the hose submerged in brake fluid.. then , s-l-o-w-l-y push the brake pedal , 10-20 times..
It seemed to do the trick...

Great idea about the Hozelock pressure spray... the caps seem to be the crux, of the matter.....and you have done well to find them.

Good to see all the hands on progress you are making John, it'll end up a very sweet car.

All the best
Liam
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
thanks :) next job is to weld him into his mot cabinet :)

That's interesting about the calipers... I've never swapped any, but mine do look a bit pitted and ropey tbh...

The brake bleeding is something I don't like doing tbh..
but the nipples have never snapped, as of yet... so maybe an unfounded fear...
Just think next time, it'll cost nothing...saving £50 every time you use it...on any car for the future ...£££ savings !


When I swapped the back axle the brakes were really bad...foot to floor time ..
I read somewhere to loosen the nipples a bit put a hose on them , and put the hose submerged in brake fluid.. then , s-l-o-w-l-y push the brake pedal , 10-20 times..
It seemed to do the trick...

Great idea about the Hozelock pressure spray... the caps seem to be the crux, of the matter.....and you have done well to find them.

Good to see all the hands on progress you are making John, it'll end up a very sweet car.

All the best
Liam
My calipers were knackered, lack of proper maintenance you see. That's why you should bleed your brakes. Brake fluid takes in moisture, which becomes water. Once water is in the system, it rusts the cylinders and pistons from the inside, then the brakes don't work so well, and can end up seizing completely.

I don't like bleeding brakes myself, its a lot of messing about, that's why I bought the Sealey kit. But don't be afraid to do the job, the method you used works fine, but it would work a much better if you had someone pumping the brake.

This is the sort of thing I was talking about, you can buy the caps, but not this one obviously, too bloody expensive. Probably to deter people from making their own brake bleeders. Other companies make kits as well and sell the parts separately. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Sealey-VS820SA-Brake-Bleeding-Reservoir-Cap-42mm-Straight-Connector-For-VS820/172531130802?epid=1105894571&hash=item282ba821b2:g:l4oAAOSwr~lYosOg

This is what I done this evening, when I bled the brakes, I think I should have pumped the brake a few time to settle the pistons, as they were new. Then bled them again, IYSWIM. There was a bit of slack to take up before the shoes came into contact with the discs.
 

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My calipers were knackered, lack of proper maintenance you see. That's why you should bleed your brakes. Brake fluid takes in moisture, which becomes water. Once water is in the system, it rusts the cylinders and pistons from the inside, then the brakes don't work so well, and can end up seizing completely.

I don't like bleeding brakes myself, its a lot of messing about, that's why I bought the Sealey kit. But don't be afraid to do the job, the method you used works fine, but it would work a much better if you had someone pumping the brake.

This is the sort of thing I was talking about, you can buy the caps, but not this one obviously, too bloody expensive. Probably to deter people from making their own brake bleeders. Other companies make kits as well and sell the parts separately. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Sealey-VS820SA-Brake-Bleeding-Reservoir-Cap-42mm-Straight-Connector-For-VS820/172531130802?epid=1105894571&hash=item282ba821b2:g:l4oAAOSwr~lYosOg

This is what I done this evening, when I bled the brakes, I think I should have pumped the brake a few time to settle the pistons, as they were new. Then bled them again, IYSWIM. There was a bit of slack to take up before the shoes came into contact with the discs.
Looks impressive !
and no more worrying about the brakes for quite a while !

ya gotta love the 106, in that you can have a tinker when the need arises :)

cheers
Liam
 

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My calipers were knackered, lack of proper maintenance you see. That's why you should bleed your brakes. Brake fluid takes in moisture, which becomes water. Once water is in the system, it rusts the cylinders and pistons from the inside, then the brakes don't work so well, and can end up seizing completely.

I don't like bleeding brakes myself, its a lot of messing about, that's why I bought the Sealey kit. But don't be afraid to do the job, the method you used works fine, but it would work a much better if you had someone pumping the brake.
Brake fluid absorbs atmospheric water (moisture). But it won't rust the system from inside it needs oxygen (air) to do that. What it does do is lower the boiling point of brake fluid, which is why it should be flushed out periodically.

I have simply let gravity do the work to bleed brakes on many occasions, remove the cap on the master cylinder, undo the bleed nipple, and wait. Obviously it's quicker with an assistant or a bleeding system.

Roger.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Brake fluid absorbs atmospheric water (moisture). But it won't rust the system from inside it needs oxygen (air) to do that. What it does do is lower the boiling point of brake fluid, which is why it should be flushed out periodically.

I have simply let gravity do the work to bleed brakes on many occasions, remove the cap on the master cylinder, undo the bleed nipple, and wait. Obviously it's quicker with an assistant or a bleeding system.

Roger.
One of my calipers was rusted inside, it wouldn't move in or out. To free it, or at least try to, I took the pads out and pumped the brake pedal. I didn't push the piston all the way out, but I could see rust well beyond the rubber seal.

Wheel Cylinder Inspection & Repair
 
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