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Discussion Starter #1
Hello!

First thanks for all the good stuff put inside this forum - great! :thumb:

One thing that's buggin' me for the last year: I own 407sw (1.6hdi) I had all sorts of minor and not so minor problems but the car is really nice and after havin it for about 4 years it's now in better shape than when I got it :nod:

One thing that annoys me very, and by each day more, is ground clearance - there isn't a single month/week that I son't scrub cars "nose" and often been collecting plates on the streets :mad: - in minor uphills/downhills: and than flat surface - or not to mention going on off-road roads (very very good ones, not mud/dirt/gravel...).

Is there a cheap/efficient way to raise cars ground clearance? In my case 2-3cm (about 1") would be noticable, about 5cm (2") would be great.
Yes there is a way: with bigger tires, but I've bought very good (Continental) tyres and they are 16" - also have new summer tyres, so... I guess 18" is not an option. With 17" I calculated that the gain is minimal - not noticable.

So.. Have anybody done that? There is "rubber" that can be inserted into suspension coils: but have no idea how that affects handling? And how much is gained (on stock suspensions).
There are so indie suspensions that can have adjusted height, but... they are quite expensive.
Maybe "bigger" (lenght) coils?

Any solution? I do not think that driving experience is compromised since car is by itself quite low, so this should not be a problem. Also: few weeks ago I saw 508sw in some kind of "cross" variant and it was quite "high" and looked great: although it's not the same car - it's its successor so.. I guess it is possible.

I know.. but if you own 407 you must know what I'm talking about. Friends with mondeo, and not to mention C5 (hydraulics susp.) "laughed" at me when we went to mountains on weekend trip - there were some off-road gravel roads... but mondeo had no problem, c5 raised to about 16cm :) I just kept scratching and tried to do my best not to damage anyting.

So... any advice, or if anybody has done that: it would be great!

Thanks in advance!
 

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You can get rubber spring assisters for towing caravans, to stop the arse sagging. Whether or not they would do anything I don't know.
I used a pair on the front of my Rover for about a month, until Eibach decided their lowering kit wasn't suitable for the 2.0 petrol and had lowered it too much. Causing much scraping. They worked alright on it, until they sent me new springs.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the answer - yes I'm aware of those: just been reading that they deteriorate quite fast... don't know, maybe lowcost ones.

What about these kind:

Yes, they probably make front a little more stiff, but that should not be the problem,or is it? Let's say on turns (?) when cars weight shifts to front outer tyre?

Probably will go for a first option - but been seriously considering second ones (steel spacers) - a pair per tyre to balance the spring. More durable, maybe easier to install, can be made at home (=stronger),.. but a little less spring "elasticity".

Any opinions?

Btw: should I install also on rear wheels? Since some of the weight shifts back by raising front side.

Has nobody done that..? Been reading/hearing about similar problems... so I am not the only one "scratching the bottom" :rolleyes:
 

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I have the same problem scraping, worse still on Turkish side roads. Never did find a way to raise it satisfactorily. Those metal spacers would raise the height but stiffen the ride too, and maybe stress the spring at the fitting point, unlike a rubber item. What about new longer springs? They can be made to order, or extended spring seats with normal springs? Might need spring seats making by engineering firm, to give an inch more?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hello!

Yes longer springs are also an option - a little more work implied.

Never did find a way to raise it satisfactorily.
Did you try any of these?
I'd like to hear real experts opinion on 'stiff' ride. Does it mean less control or just stiffer ride (ok, there is a "confort" limit :))

This week I'll test (if I find the time) "steel" option - it'll be DIY: because it's kinda simple - no need to order pre-made.
But quite worried about stiff ride.

If it goes well then... I guess I'll stick to that. Else: rubber - which makes more sense to me because it's elastic not stiff as metal.

Will (try) to report... if someone is interested.
 

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Yes i'm interested to see how you get on with it. By stiff ride I mean the chassis will have less tendency to roll or pitch. Putting stiffeners in between the coils will cause them to be more solid, downside is you'll feel bumps more, so will the suspension components. With the body riding higher it may induce some understeer too depending how you drive. Whatever you change, the effect you want to achieve may be met by effects you didn't want to achieve. I think that's newtons law.
 

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I'll start with saying I'm not familiar with how the 407 struts mount to the body.

However it may be possible to have a steel spacer made to fit the top of the strut/body mounting point effectively raising car but keeping the same strut travel.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hello

So... I put rubber spacers (from ebay) into the gap on each front wheel coil. Had to shorten them a bit - they were a bit too long. I measured the distance for 1 gap and it's (in my case 40mm) - so I installed 39mm.

It's a bit tricky - well at least first one: you must push it very hard to place properly the gap of spacer onto a coil. Once it's on the coil you can move it 'around' (literally) - then fix them: although they are not gonna fall (or move) out for sure, since the pressure of cars' weight holds them in place.

I don't know how long they'll last - rubber seems firm, but temperature, moisture, ice, snow,... we'll see. Measured distance gained is about 15-20mm (since the ground is not exactly flat it's hard to say for sure). But it's noticable. So far so good. Maybe even a little better experience (? :)) - but that's my personal opinion because a little firmer springs seems (too me) a little more robust..

Thinking about putting another one on each side. But then I guess I'd have to put one also on back wheels. I guess polyurethane ones would be better: saw test of squeezing them: they are incredible - came to almost exact same shape/form.

I'll post some pictures to show the diff.: before & after, if somebody will find it interesting.

And: Steering/handling is not an issue... at all. All good and same as before.
Just not hitting all the pavements when parking :thumb:
 
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