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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys!

I have seen a lot of threads about water getting in to the 207's ECU wiring loom.. seems pretty fatal.

It sounds so simple, is there a simple preventative measure I (and others!) can take on my 2008 1.4 VTi Sport to make sure that this isn't a worry?
 

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I had this happen on my 207 in October 2014. Happily the repair was eventually funded by Peugeot after a load of agro. Since then I have done something to try and prevent it happening again. In my case the water came from the windscreen washer bottle through the faulty pump. I have heard that the water can also come from the engine coolant temperature sensor. Can anyone confirm 100% that this does actually happen ?

I've cut the wires to the windscreen washer pump about 6 inches from the pump and have then soldered the wires back together. That should stop water tracking along the copper wire as it can't get past the soldered section (if the pump fails again). Also water can't get through the coloured insulation plastic sleeve as there is a break in it where I cut and soldered the wire. I've done exactly the same to the coolant temperature sensor which I eventually found near the end of the engine above the gearbox. I had to take out the battery for access. I did take a photo (coolant temperature sensor only) which I will post later when I get time to offload it from my smart phone. The work was quite easy to do but I will admit I'm an electrical / electronics technician. The most difficult part was getting access to the washer pump and coolant sensor as neither are very easy to get to.

Just to clarify something. The water goes through the inner of the cables along the strands of copper and inside the coloured plastic insulation and that's how it gets to the connectors of the ECU or fuse box. The water does not simply run along the outside of the wires. Think of the wires being like a thin plastic pipe and you'll get the idea how this happens. Although there is copper inside the plastic sleeving it is still possible for water to get through. I did an experiment to prove it.
 

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in my case the water was in the loom sleeve, simply pulling the fog light part of the loom and letting it drop emptied all the water out, i think it got in through the bit of the loom by the abs ecu and got sucked up as the engine/loom cooled, not sure though, may nick a small hole in the loom case next time to act as a breather.
 

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I couldn't work out how to add the picture. It seems I can add a photo from the internet but I couldn't work out how to add a photo which is on my computer desktop. Any ideas ?
 

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Yeah if it's on your desktop - when you post a reply scroll down and select 'Manage Attachments' from the 'attach Files' option in the 'additional options' section below the submit reply button.

Hope that makes sense - it reads quite confusing :lol:

I've put my car in my signature because I'm not sure if my model is prone to this fault - anyone else know?
 

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Thank you, I have saved this pic - no way I would dare do it but I know someone who might, Still searching trying to find if my model is prone to this :thumb:
 

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And you haven't insulated the solder joins ?

A correctly soldered joint would have the solder flowing between all the copper strands effectively making the joint a solid conductor which would block the moisture using the channels to flow. Heat shrink would probably have been perfectly adequate to finish the job and still prevent water ingress but if the paranoia was high enough, spraying the joints thoroughly with a pcb protective laquer would have done the water protection perfectly with the benefit of also insulating the joints.

Still, being an electrical / electronics technician you would already know that.
 

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The solder does indeed completely block the passage of any water by joining all of the copper strands together. The joins once soldered have been left open so any water coming from the coolant sensor or washer pump can escape from the end of the coloured insulation and simply drip off the wire. I didn't want to fit heat shrink tube in case that can carry any water from one side of the solder join across to the other side.

Clearly it's important that the two solder joins don't touch each other or any other metal work. The photo is of the coolant temperature sensor but I've done the same thing to the washer pump wiring since in my case that's where the disaster occurred on my 207 last year. The washer pump wiring mod took about 10 minutes but the coolant sensor took longer as I had to remove the battery and ECU to gain access.
 

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You seem to have overlooked the fact that moisture can now enter the cables at the point where the insulation has been cut on both side of the joint and run through the unsoldered strands in both directions. This moisture can come from anywhere including the moist atmosphere and so makes the fix impractical. All this has accomplished is to give the moisture a shorter path to follow.

Coating the bare joint up to and over the insulation in both directions with a good PCB lacquer will completely seal the joint and protect it from water / moisture ingress and give the electrical insulation to prevent the mishap that is going to happen sooner or later. I would have thought this would have been obvious given your technical background.
 

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It wasn't something which has been overlooked. Experiments were conducted by myself on my old wiring loom which was removed during repair. I could only cause water ingress through the wiring when the water was pumped under pressure. In my case that happened when the washer bottle liquid was pumped under pressure by a leaking washer pump. I couldn't cause water to enter the cable where it wasn't under pressure for example when leaving a section of wire in a glass dish full of water for several weeks. I'm not saying that applying lacquer is the wrong thing to do but my own experiments and conclusions lead me to leave it "open" on my own vehicle. There is a thin smear of grease over the joins (to prevent corrosion) but you probably can't notice on the photos.

It's for each owner to decide for themselves what preventive measures they want to take if anything at all. I'm happy to share the details of my own modification given that somebody has asked the question on here but it's not a recommendation. There will be plenty of people who think I've either wasted my time or done it wrong but I have peace of mind believing that I've reduced the chances of this problem happening again on my own vehicle :)
 

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It's for each owner to decide for themselves what preventive measures they want to take if anything at all. I'm happy to share the details of my own modification given that somebody has asked the question on here but it's not a recommendation.
The point is that your initial post comes across as being a recommendation as being the correct way to resolve an issue that isn't going to affect everybody who has a 207. Nowhere in the initial post did you write any kind of disclaimer. The grease may well prevent corrosion but there is still a chance of accidental shorting due to insufficient electrical insulation. The whole point of forums like this is to pass on information to help others in a safe manner and to warn others who may use your ideas of any potential pitfalls. This was eventually coaxed out of you.

I'll stick to the way I was taught to protect electrical joints and electronics in the correct manner. It has served me well for over 30 years maintaining & repairing state of the art equipment costing anywhere from a few tens of thousands to over a million quid.
 

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An old post but a cracker

Electrical faults are this cars Achilles heel. (As well as oil leaks... :lol:)

All these endless reports of electrical faults on the forum through water ingress - could not really understand what people where going on about when banging on about window washer fluid zapping there ECUs (which are miles away from water sources), until this post above - water goes *in-between* the copper wires in the actual loom - under pressure - along to the ECUs/Fusebox!

Am now getting some intermittent faults with the airbags and seatbelts which are likely electrical on my 207 1.4 2006. I have had a lot of water over the loom bundle which is right by the thermostat from messing with the thermostat.

I guess the best method to prevent this is to use a gas powered soldering iron; tinning the bits and putting pcb spray on, and after that, some heatshrink...
 

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Explains quite a bit.

Hi I also own a 207 but it is the GT model. After multiple visits to the garage and sending pumps and ECU for tests it was becoming a complete headache. I knew of the water ingress but on all the other forums and threads no one ever explained much about it in detail.

After reading this thread I am certain this is also the cause of my 207's faults. That be ABS/ESP faults, power steering fault, Power delivery issues and other faults that look more like a shopping list on the code reader. I will check the loom from the washer bottle and various other sections as well when I'm pluggng the ECU back in and reinstalling the ABS pump. I did notice water ON THE SIDE of the ECU but no water in any of the plugs (checked the fuse box and ECU) when I unplugged it the other day when sending it for testing. Needless to say the ABS and ECU come back as "A OK".

Unlike everyone in the entire history of the internet I will post back if this IS the fault and if it fixed my problems.

Also if any of you guys know where I could get my hands on a new loom that isn't Hock my Sh*te eBay I would be greatly appreciative.

--------------------------------- EDIT------------------------------
Just seen how old this thread is but I will still post another message as to whether this is the cause of the faults.
 

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This is an old thread but it could be bloomin useful!!!
Ive just bought a 2011 207 & read this thread with interest but am i right in thinking its earlier cars that are affected??? Or is that just fingers crossed wishful thinking lol
 

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we have/had a 2007 car, all was fine ecu and fusebox side but when we first had it after pulling the abs ecu and fog light plugs water poured out of the loom from the outer casing, i guess it was that that killed our original abs ecu. Just taped it up watertight and been fine since (over 5 years)
 

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Solder is not ideal to use to join wires in a car or any other vibrating machine. Nasa actually tested this and recommends crimping instead. The awg of car wire means electrical crimps and crimpers are needed. It's a lot easier to crimp rather than solder as well.


Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
 

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I've read somewhere else on the internet that apparently the washer jet motor seal goes faulty. This then instead of pushing water to the windows front or back shoots water up in to the loom at high pressure actually in to the copper strands. The solution is a new seal and washer motor and replace the engine bay loom all at a tidy sum of 1300 quid and I think that's just for the loom. Theres also the six hour job to remove the old loom and put the new one in.
 

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My brother-in-law's 207SW suffered the same fate when the washer pump went faulty. Luckily the ECU was replaced under warranty so the problem was solved without us having to do anything.
But, just a thought - would it be possible to cut the wire from the ecu to the pump and feed it to the input side of a relay, then connect the output side of the relay from the battery (via an inline fuse) to the pump? That way the pump would be completely isolated from the ECU. I don't know whether the ECU would "recognise" the difference between a pump and a relay but it is a thought. Perhaps someone could advise.
 
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