Peugeot Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

First post - so please be gentle :D

I have a 2002 Pug 307 - 2.0 HDi 110. I've owned the car since 38k and now it's on 110k, so this has been my baby for over 5 years and done me very well.

One thing I've always struggled with since 38k is the car having poor fuel economy. I struggle to get anything above 40mpg on a full tank, even when most of this is motorway driving (at around 80mph). As strange as it sounds, whether I drive it hard or soft, in town or long distance, it always comes back at around 40mpg.

I feel like I should be getting at least 45-50mpg. What are the obvious things that could be the issue? The car is regularly serviced and runs very well, lots of power and responsiveness and never lets me down.

Now the diesel additive minimum level message has been coming on since 50K miles (so the last 60k miles I've done!). Car runs perfect though, so I don't feel like I want to fork out big money to either get the DPF replaced or the additive replaced.

Appreciate some thoughts :)
 
C

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Filling additive is about £100.

If you've done 60k with this warning I'm surprised car still running, that's if dpf is still fitted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Filling additive is about £100.

If you've done 60k with this warning I'm surprised car still running, that's if dpf is still fitted.
DPF is still there. Having done 60k miles without additive, I'm guessing it's pointless adding additive in now and would make more sense to replace or modify the DPF if there was an issue?

As I do mostly motorway driving over 2500RPM, I'm guessing the DPF is getting a decent cleaning out anyway with the exhaust gases so the additive is probably not needed?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
302 Posts
DPF is still there. Having done 60k miles without additive, I'm guessing it's pointless adding additive in now and would make more sense to replace or modify the DPF if there was an issue?

As I do mostly motorway driving over 2500RPM, I'm guessing the DPF is getting a decent cleaning out anyway with the exhaust gases so the additive is probably not needed?
if you get teh dpf removed try and get the out casing put back on i.e take off dpf open it remove inards weld or scerw back togther as some a diffrent then put back on car reason for it new mot rules if it was fitted standard has to be on hte car but its on external examintion not internal
 
J

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I don't think 40mpg is too bad if you're doing 80mph... I bet if you knocked that back to 70mph the economy would go up significantly.... I remember the manual saying for my 306 HDI that driving at 80mph uses 25% more fuel than at 70mph, and that was direct from Peugeot :nod:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
As with JMKent, it'll drop over 70, but all the usual things apply, double check you have the right tyre pressure. Oil up, and definitely check your DPF (add the fluid, use the cleaning guide on the forum), if dirty, it may well be restricting exhaust gasses and drop your consumption (though motorway driving helps it clear anyhow, city driving kills them more). Might be worth spending £4 and sticking some injector cleaner through the system next time you fill up.

I'm assuming your car is serviced regularly (air/ fuel filters clean).


Keep a steady foot pressure (you already know about having a heavy foot!), drive with the AC off and windows shut when possible, and definitley remove bike racks etc from the roof, they are horrendous! And take some of the junk out the boot!

Mythbusters on TV showed a dramatic decrease in fuel consumption by tail gaiting! Whilst I don't recommend this at all (and you'll probably use more as you try and judge the distance safely anyway,as it wont be smooth), they still found improvements at 10-20m. So follow that van!

55mph control: 32mpg
100ft: 35.5mpg, 11% improvement
50ft: 38.5mpg, 20%
20ft: 40.5mpg, 27%
10ft: 44.5mpg, 39%
2ft: 41mpg, 29%
 
J

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Its probably the reason why lorries sit right up the backside of the one in front, both to save them fuel and gain speed :nod:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Its probably the reason why lorries sit right up the backside of the one in front, both to save them fuel and gain speed :nod:
yep, you can drive along happily at 55 behind another lorry, with lots of extra power speed available when you're there, pull out for the overtake and its like driving into a brick wall, flat out and losing speed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Probably driving style.
I personally drive most of the time and change gears at around 2000rpm. Do around 60mph on motorway and accelerate smoothly albeit slowly. However get great mpg.
I put in 40 litres from an empty tank last Friday and have done around 515 miles so far.
So allow for maybe 5 litres left in tank from before when I thought it was empty I'm easily getting around 50mpg. If I do more motorway use I'm sure it will get better.

If all your servicing items are done properly, tyre pressures good maybe even a tad higher then it's mostly driving style that kills the mpg.

As said try and drive at and change gear round 2000rpm. Very boring however getting good mpg becomes addictive
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,912 Posts
Due to speed limiters jm you sometimes find although you may be faster, there is insufficient power to break through the bow wave of air pressure needed to overtake, and often its a case of waiting for better conditions such as him in front cant pull so well uphill, so you lay in wait and then clear off. Can be very frustrating. Apologies to all those that may have been delayed while i broke through a bow wave. Good things speed limiters, not. 2,500kms weekly and all at 56mph max, grrr! Dont care now, ive retired
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top