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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Peugeot 207 1.4 2006 model

It doesnt start and there are no error codes.

when this originally happened the cars window wipers activated when the key was turned to the ignition position and when they key would be turned to the run/start position the car would turn over but not start.
At this point i tried a BSI reset but im not entirely sure it worked but now there
are differnt symptoms.

When the key is turned to the ignition position the wipers do not activate instead there is a flashing battery light on the dash similar to what you would see if economy mode was activated, when the key is turned to run the car doesnt start and the battery light keeps flashing.

none of the instrument cluster works, not even the fan blower/automatic windows/radio.

there is still an odometer reading on the dash and im able to communicate with the ECU with a basic scan tool but there are no error codes. im able to read the vehicles calibration ID and o2 sensors so it makes me think the ECU is alright since obd can communicate with it.

what could be the problem? i dont have peugeot planet and i would take it to peugeot dealer but i cant even drive it there also i believe they would be way too expensive.

any help i have no car at the moment .
 

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Could be a few things from the bsi to a relay in the engine bay.

Unfortunately a basic code reader won't see all the fault codes.

Where are u from?

Sent from my SM-G925F using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Could be a few things from the bsi to a relay in the engine bay.

Unfortunately a basic code reader won't see all the fault codes.

Where are u from?

Sent from my SM-G925F using Tapatalk
Thanks for your reply; i've managed to get it working after a few hours with it. i took the BSI out of the car and took it apart dispite how much it was raining i was adament to get it done before the new years day. i found the trace leading to one of the external I/O's was fried! blackened i wish i took pictures but i was in too much of a hurry to get this working. after soldering the trace with a jumper wire and putitng it back together i BSI reset and it fired right up. what a releif!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Bsi must have burnt out for a reason you may well have temporarily cured it
I agree with reliable406. Many printed circuit boards are desinged so that certain tracks act like fuses. Excessive current will cause the track to melt. Bridgeing the track with wire may well have apparently 'cured' the problem but if the excessive current draw is still there you could end up with the car in flames.

You really need to find out what caused the track to burn out.
 

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If that's the case, it's bad design. The BSI carries fuses which should protect the power supply and it's own circuitry against downstream faults. Of course, if someone puts in excessively rated fuses, all bets are off, so it might be an idea to compare the fuses fitted against the values in the handbook.
 

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was in the electric game many years ago, used to use 12v trip switches for diagnostic in things like this, no idea if they still sell them but saved swapping fuses etc.
think i would have soldered a fuse in just in case.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Everything seems fine right now, its been extremely wet with the floods not so far from my area so it may be due to a fault caused by water ingress.

Ive sealed the under body today with some 3M underbody sealant to help safeguard it from hopefully happening again. If it does happen again i will have to meticulously follow the trace to the I/O it represents and then the wire all the way to the fault which is more of a summer task :p i dont have a garage so working outside to solve the problem ideally isnt ideal :p

The fuses match the ratings on the information on autodata and the blown trace on the PCB i had to repair is connected to the 20A yellow mini blade fuse.

I wish this damn rain would stop as i now have the biggest cold from yesterdays efforts. it would be perfect if i knew the actual cause but like i say; conditions are not good enough for me to investigate further :p

Ive only just 3-4 months ago got done with putting a new headgasket on it and replaced pretty much all the consumables so its very much a blessing i was able to find out the problem here are pictures if you are interested.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/4l4sbfgpr5axv0n/AADRfMWVEMM_xECn1_sErWRUa?dl=0
 

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If that's the case, it's bad design. The BSI carries fuses which should protect the power supply and it's own circuitry against downstream faults. Of course, if someone puts in excessively rated fuses, all bets are off, so it might be an idea to compare the fuses fitted against the values in the handbook.
Nope - it's far from a bad design - it is in fact a clever and safe design. It is used for when people put too large a fuse in place. The track will burn out well before the excessive current draw causes an electrical fire. It is pretty common to find a blown fuse has tin foil or wire strands across the two contacts to get a circuit working again.
 

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I would agree, but the OP has made clear that too large a fuse was not used, and, moreover, it is the function of the fusible link to act as a safeguard against a fuse of too high a value.

My view is that the track probably did not fail by design, but by a defect in manufacture. My reasoning is that the fuse which safeguarded the track did not blow, so the track failed at a lower current than the fuse rating.
 
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