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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi folks,

Long time lurker. I recently installed a towbar on my 3008, and discovered there’s very little out there on how to remove everything that needs removing. Noting not everyone has access to ServiceBox, I decided to invest a couple of hours writing up a guide to removing the rear bumper of the new series Peugeot 3008 to install a towbar. The process may be similar for the Peugeot 5008 (P87), Citroen C5 Aircross, and Opel Grandland X (P1UO) because of the shared platform and parts. I’ve skimmed over the wiring guide for the towing harness, but there’s a copy of the genuine Peugeot guide attached below for the factory harness, which is more about running the harness from the boot to the dashboard, versus actually wiring up an aftermarket harness. I’ve broken the process into four main stages, so you can skip bits if you’re doing something different.
  • Stage 1 – Remove boot interior panels for trailer harness
  • Stage 2 – Remove rear bar
  • Stage 3 – Fit towbar
  • Stage 4 – Put it all back together
Tools
  • T20 torx bit (surprisingly, every torx screw is this size)
  • 10/13/17/19mm sockets and spanners
  • Suitable ratchets with long and short extensions
  • Screwdriver or plastic trim removers (preferred, to minimise any scratches or marks)
  • Paint scraper or oscillating multitool with scraper attachment
  • Jigsaw or oscillating multitool with cutting attachment or dremel with cutting wheel
  • If you’ve got a drill/driver with a socket bit adaptor, it makes things significantly faster, rather than ratcheting away slowly.
  • Plastic container/s for your nuts and bolts to store what you remove. Not only does it prevent you from misplacing anything, when you reassemble, you shouldn’t have anything left. If you do, you’ve forgotten to refit something (except in this case, where you will have a few that don't go back).
  • Towbar kit (in this case an 'Auto-Hak Detachable European Towbar for 2016+ Peugeot 3008/2019+ Citroen C5 - Part number F47A)
Left and right are based from the rear, looking from the boot towards the front of the car.

I've written it up as detailed instructions, but also took some photos during the install which can be found in the album linked below. It's not comprehensive, and in some cases doesn't highlight EVERY nut/screw/bolt, but it's designed to help visualise where I'm talking about and what the area looks like. With both combined, you should be able to make short work of it.


Stage 1 – Boot trim removal
If you only need to remove the rear bar, it’s not necessary to remove the interior panels. You can use the rhombus shaped access panels to remove the tail lights. You only need to remove the interior trim for the trailer wiring harness.
  • Remove boot floor and parcel tray (two ropes simply unclip from their mounts on the lid, whole tray easily pops out)
  • Put the rear seats down, and remove the centre trim panel at the base of the seats – one round plug offset to the right simply pulls out, pull up the velcro carpet that attaches to the backs of the seats, and gently tug the panel off from each end. It’s just attached with inbuilt clips. Remove panel and place to side.
  • Remove the rear panel that covers the boot latch – there’s three plugs left/middle/right in which the middle of the plug pulls out first, which then allows the whole plug to be pulled free. Carefully pry up the panel – it has both moulded clips and blue panel clips all the top that break easily, so be careful. If you break any blue clips, you should be able to find matching replacements at your local auto parts store (I may have broken them all in the multiple times I’ve pulled off that cover..).
  • Top left panel cover – Remove the top panel that covers the seatbelt mechanism and holds the parcel tray supports. There’s no screws or plugs, just inbuilt clips. Start from the rear and move towards the seatbelt, gently pulling out and up. It will progressively unclip and come free, but stuck on the seatbelt. Pull the seatbelt through the cutout, and put the panel aside.
  • Main left panel – Start by removing the two covers – one large round plug that is popped out with a screwdriver or plastic panel prybar, and a rectangular cover surrounding the D-ring tie down towards the seats. There’s a 10mm nut next to the D-ring to remove. Then two round flat plastic nuts at the bottom of the panel front and rear – they just unscrew by hand. There’s three T20 torx screws to remove along the top of the panel - one behind the round cover, and two along the top of the panel. At this point, the panel should be free, but you need to unplug the wiring connections to the 12V socket and boot light. You also need to detach the lever mechanism for the seats. The easiest way is to work from behind the panel, press in the clips back and sides, and the whole mechanism will push out the front of the panel. Then just do a bit of jiggling and manoeuvring, and you can pass it back through the gap. The panel is now free to remove from the vehicle.
  • You shouldn’t need to remove the right panels, but if you need do, the process is the same minus the wiring connections.
Stage 2 – Rear bar/bumper removal
  • Disconnect the battery, pull up hard on the red tab of the positive terminal to disconnect.
  • Rear tail lights – You need to remove them to remove the rear bar. They’re each held on with one single 10mm nut from behind. If you haven’t removed the interior panels, simply pop open the rhombus shaped access cover on each side with a plastic trim remover. You’ll be able to put your hand in and feel towards the rear for the nut. Use a long extension socket to get to the nut, and be careful on removal not to drop the nut. It’ll be impossible to retrieve without a magnet on a stick, even harder if the whole panel isn’t off. Once the nut is free, gently push down on the plastic clip below the bolt, and wiggle the light assembly free. Once part way removed, disconnect the wiring plug by pressing down on the burled area – it can be a bit finicky. Once unplugged, remove light and store safely.
  • Remove the two torx screws (one on each side) visible from the open boot
  • Underneath the rear of the car is a plastic panel that you need to remove – it has four torx screws along the rear that connects the panel to the rear bar, and then four 10mm nuts that holds the panel on. You’ll need a long extension to reach two of them that are high up in the holes on the panel. Whilst you’re already on the ground, remove the four torx screws (two on each corner) of the rear bar, just behind the rear wheel. With the cover removed, you’ll also see a torx screw on each side of the car, mounted on the horizontal supporting the rear bar, which need to be removed.
  • Now you need to remove the wheel arch trim – Start by removing the three torx screws on the plastic wheel well plastic cover, behind the rear wheel. It will allow you to get your hand behind the arch trim, which is held on by a lot of plastic clips. The first five closest to the rear are moulded onto the trim panel, so you don’t want to break them. With your hand behind the wheel well cover, you can press in the tabs as you pull free the trim away from the car, reducing the risk of breaking anything. After those, the rest are all normal blue panel clips, so just carefully pull it further off. The trim only really needs to come halfway off, so you could leave it there, but you might find it easier to remove the whole thing. With the trim half off/removed, you have easier access to remove the fourth torx screw on the wheel well cover – this makes it easier to move the panel to the side, where you’ll find a 10mm nut on the top holding the whole rear bar to the body of the wheel. Repeat on the other side of the car. The rear bar should now be free of all screws/nuts and ready to remove.
  • To remove the whole bar, start at the bottom corner behind the wheel – pull the panel out and up, and it will start to release. Gently start moving up along the join prying it away from the car. Once you get to the area where the taillight was, two tabs should slide out, and one tab just needs to be pressed down with your finger to pop it out. Repeat the same on the other side, and now the whole rear bar should be free and start to slide away from the car.
  • At this point keep the bar supported, as it’s still connected to at least three (possibly more, depending on options like the kick sensor for the auto boot) wiring plugs. Remove these by pushing the orange tabs up, and then lifting the locking tab up, at which point the plug should slide out of the socket. Repeat on all connections. Congratulations, your rear bar is now free to put safely away to the side.
Stage 3 – Towbar Installation
  • Assuming you’re installing a towbar, at this point you should really follow the specific instructions supplied with that particular setup. But the next steps will generally align to all towbars.
  • You first need to scrape away the sealant that interferes with the fitment of the side brackets. Place the bracket in place on the existing bolts, and mark with a pen each end of the bracket on the sealant so you know how much needs to removed. It’s not exactly easy to remove by hand with a scraper or screwdriver – I found it faster to use an oscillating multitool with a scraper attachment fitted. You basically need to remove any of the sealant which prevents the bracket from sitting flush with the body of the car. Be sure to test fit to make sure you’ve cleaned enough away.
  • Mount the main towbar – remove the three specified 13mm bolts from each side of the anti-intrusion bar mount as per your instructions. Mount up the towbar and fit with the new bolts you’d have been supplied with. Check the instructions carefully, because you may find some of those bolts fit via the back, rather than the front. Fit all six bolts loosely, do not tighten at this point.
  • Fit the side brackets – mount the bracket loosely on the existing bolts, and then put the supplied bolts through the bracket to connect to the towbar. By keeping everything loose at this point, it ensures there’s enough wiggle room so everything lines up properly and is flush.
  • Tighten up your bracket bolts to the specified torque of your instructions, then tighten up the bolts/nuts on the main towbar. This required 13, 17 and 19mm sockets/spanners for my AutoHak brand towbar.
  • You’ll then need to mount up the tow hitch as per your instructions, and the bracket for your trailer wiring socket (again for AutoHak - 19mm bolts and nuts).
  • Mount up your trailer socket, and run the wiring loom along the bar to the left, up and over the anti-intrusion bar mount, along the side bracket. There’s an existing wiring grommet, which has enough room to fit the wiring harness. It’s easiest to cut an X into the grommet from above in the boot with a box cutter, and then feed your wiring loom up from the bottom. With your wiring harness in the boot, you can wire as per whatever instructions you have. I used a genuine factory harness, so it was mostly all plug and play into existing connections, with a full guide available.
  • So with the whole towbar and harness mounted, it’s time to cut out the rear bar to fit your towbar. Again you should have instructions for you towbar which specify exactly what dimensions you need. It’s easiest to apply some masking tape to the general area, and measure and draw where you need to cut on the tape. To make the cut, you can either use an oscillating multitool with a cutting blade (my preference), a jigsaw with a fine blade, or a Dremel tool with a cutting disc. My preferred trick is to leave the ends of the cut to last, so the panel holds in place until it’s almost all done (rather than flapping about). Test fit the rear bar to ensure it properly clears the towbar – enlarge the cut if necessary.
Stage 4 - Refitting
  • Now it’s basically reversing the whole process to reinstall everything. Reconnect the wiring plugs, put the rear bar roughly in place. Make sure the tabs under the tail light are properly aligned, and start pushing the bar back into place, moving from the tail light down towards the wheel. Repeat on the other side. Replace all the screws on the wheel well covers, put your screws back onto the corners and the two horizontal connections. Replace the bottom cover and all nuts and torx screws (Note - you probably cut away a section where one screw would have gone, so you should finish up with one spare torx screw, along with the six factory anti-intrusion bar bolts. If you have more, you’ve forgotten something somewhere!).
  • Refit your tail lights, not forgetting to connect the plugs. Refit your wheel arch trims, tapping them all the clips back into place – if you removed them completely, you’ll need to open the rear passenger doors to fit it properly. Everything for the exterior should now be back together.
  • Refit your interior trim pieces as required, same reverse process as for removal. Once you’re done, you’ll need to run along the inside lip of the boot seal, so it covers the edges of the panels you removed.
  • Wash your hands, and enjoy a nice cold drink. Hopefully it took you several less hours because you used this guide, rather than winging it with minimal references.

Congratulations, you’ve now successfully fitted your new towbar (or done whatever else you needed to remove the rear bumper). For wiring, you probably need to have the trailer connection activated in the ECU via DiagBox.

Extra note – despite them being the norm on any modern trailer, modern Peugeots still won’t support LED trailer lights as normal. It seems they’ve finally released a solution with an adaptor module for LED trailer lights (Part # 1675595980) available as a factory accessory. The alternate solution is either wire in some resistors in line with the plug on the trailer, or some caravans have a module available. The factory accessory is probably the best option though, as it should enable you to use any trailer without worrying about it. It just fits behind that left main boot panel.

Ignore me, it's just SEO for the benefit of others searching in the future – 2016 Peugeot 3008, 2017 Peugeot 3008, 2018 Peugeot 3008, 2019 Peugeot 3008, 2020 Peugeot 3008, 2021 Peugeot 3008, P84, Peugeot 5008, P87, Citroen C5 Aircross, Opel Grandland X, removing, removal, rear bumper, rear bar, towbar, install, installation, fitment, trailer wiring harness
 

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Dude, What an excellent piece of work. Thanks for sharing, and taking the time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Dude, What an excellent piece of work. Thanks for sharing, and taking the time.
Thanks! If only one person gets some help out of this, that'll be worth it. I mostly own Italian cars, which have countless forums with plenty of guides, so I figured if it doesn't exist, might as well write it up.

--

As a bit of a follow-up - I ended up with a few issues worth mentioning for the information of others.

One - the AutoHak tow hitch designer seems to have overlooked properly designing the holes for the D-shackle to attach your trailer safety chain. Their design means the right hand hole is roughly behind the towball release handle, so to get a shackle in that side, you have to remain the safety pin, hold back the release handle and slide the shackle in one handed. The left side interferes a bit with the socket bracket, but either way, the inner side of both holes are shorter because of the hitch design, so I couldn't get my average sized 1T shackles in. Solution - either grind the top of the shackle down (bad), or buy a smaller shackle with lower weight rating (not ideal). It's a bit of a shambles, which is a real shame, because otherwise it's a reasonable design.

Two - I had some residual issues with the genuine harness. It just wasn't functioning correctly, and when connected, the trailer tail lights would be illuminated constantly (even with the car off), but no response on the brake or turn signals. I initially thought this might be because the trailer module wasn't activated on the BSI/ECU. After checking all the connections, changing the order of the ground cables, confirming the 16 pin connector had all wires properly seated, and checking for any blown fuses, it magically started working. No obvious culprit, but obviously something wasn't quite right. At this point if you have halogen trailer lights, it should all work fine.

Three - Less an issue, more extra details because it's new. I picked up the LED trailer light module now offered as an accessory from Peugeot (as mentioned in the original post). It's pretty straightforward to fit (after removing the left side boot panel). Affix the supplied relays to the new module as per the instructions included, replace the existing module box, and just sticks to the body with supplied velcro adhesive (though not sure why it couldn't be designed with tabs to use the existing bolts). Once fitted, the LED trailer lights worked immediately - tail lights, brake and turn signals all correct. I have noticed though when the car is off it seems every 10 seconds the lights briefly flash. Not sure why this happens, but will update if I find a solution. I'm only using a box trailer for rubbish, so can easily disconnect if it was being left, but for caravans this could be problematic.

Edit: Follow-up to this - The intermittent flashing stops after about 10 minutes. It seems it just takes a while (the 10min) for all the electrics to shut down fully. So a little disconcerting initially, but nothing to worry about.

The one big lesson I confirmed - it is NOT necessary for the ECU coding for the lights to work properly. I will speak to some local dealerships about getting the coding done at some point, because going into settings and disabling the parking sensors is a bit annoying (and maybe it fixes the brief light flashes?), but ECU programming is not mandatory (caveat - I can't comment on non-removable/fixed bars, and how they might impact on the parking sensors).

Otherwise happy towing!
 

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Hi folks,

Long time lurker. I recently installed a towbar on my 3008, and discovered there’s very little out there on how to remove everything that needs removing. Noting not everyone has access to ServiceBox, I decided to invest a couple of hours writing up a guide to removing the rear bumper of the new series Peugeot 3008 to install a towbar. The process may be similar for the Peugeot 5008 (P87), Citroen C5 Aircross, and Opel Grandland X (P1UO) because of the shared platform and parts. I’ve skimmed over the wiring guide for the towing harness, but there’s a copy of the genuine Peugeot guide attached below for the factory harness, which is more about running the harness from the boot to the dashboard, versus actually wiring up an aftermarket harness. I’ve broken the process into four main stages, so you can skip bits if you’re doing something different.
  • Stage 1 – Remove boot interior panels for trailer harness
  • Stage 2 – Remove rear bar
  • Stage 3 – Fit towbar
  • Stage 4 – Put it all back together
Tools
  • T20 torx bit (surprisingly, every torx screw is this size)
  • 10/13/17/19mm sockets and spanners
  • Suitable ratchets with long and short extensions
  • Screwdriver or plastic trim removers (preferred, to minimise any scratches or marks)
  • Paint scraper or oscillating multitool with scraper attachment
  • Jigsaw or oscillating multitool with cutting attachment or dremel with cutting wheel
  • If you’ve got a drill/driver with a socket bit adaptor, it makes things significantly faster, rather than ratcheting away slowly.
  • Plastic container/s for your nuts and bolts to store what you remove. Not only does it prevent you from misplacing anything, when you reassemble, you shouldn’t have anything left. If you do, you’ve forgotten to refit something (except in this case, where you will have a few that don't go back).
  • Towbar kit (in this case an 'Auto-Hak Detachable European Towbar for 2016+ Peugeot 3008/2019+ Citroen C5 - Part number F47A)
Left and right are based from the rear, looking from the boot towards the front of the car.

I've written it up as detailed instructions, but also took some photos during the install which can be found in the album linked below. It's not comprehensive, and in some cases doesn't highlight EVERY nut/screw/bolt, but it's designed to help visualise where I'm talking about and what the area looks like. With both combined, you should be able to make short work of it.


Stage 1 – Boot trim removal
If you only need to remove the rear bar, it’s not necessary to remove the interior panels. You can use the rhombus shaped access panels to remove the tail lights. You only need to remove the interior trim for the trailer wiring harness.
  • Remove boot floor and parcel tray (two ropes simply unclip from their mounts on the lid, whole tray easily pops out)
  • Put the rear seats down, and remove the centre trim panel at the base of the seats – one round plug offset to the right simply pulls out, pull up the velcro carpet that attaches to the backs of the seats, and gently tug the panel off from each end. It’s just attached with inbuilt clips. Remove panel and place to side.
  • Remove the rear panel that covers the boot latch – there’s three plugs left/middle/right in which the middle of the plug pulls out first, which then allows the whole plug to be pulled free. Carefully pry up the panel – it has both moulded clips and blue panel clips all the top that break easily, so be careful. If you break any blue clips, you should be able to find matching replacements at your local auto parts store (I may have broken them all in the multiple times I’ve pulled off that cover..).
  • Top left panel cover – Remove the top panel that covers the seatbelt mechanism and holds the parcel tray supports. There’s no screws or plugs, just inbuilt clips. Start from the rear and move towards the seatbelt, gently pulling out and up. It will progressively unclip and come free, but stuck on the seatbelt. Pull the seatbelt through the cutout, and put the panel aside.
  • Main left panel – Start by removing the two covers – one large round plug that is popped out with a screwdriver or plastic panel prybar, and a rectangular cover surrounding the D-ring tie down towards the seats. There’s a 10mm nut next to the D-ring to remove. Then two round flat plastic nuts at the bottom of the panel front and rear – they just unscrew by hand. There’s three T20 torx screws to remove along the top of the panel - one behind the round cover, and two along the top of the panel. At this point, the panel should be free, but you need to unplug the wiring connections to the 12V socket and boot light. You also need to detach the lever mechanism for the seats. The easiest way is to work from behind the panel, press in the clips back and sides, and the whole mechanism will push out the front of the panel. Then just do a bit of jiggling and manoeuvring, and you can pass it back through the gap. The panel is now free to remove from the vehicle.
  • You shouldn’t need to remove the right panels, but if you need do, the process is the same minus the wiring connections.
Stage 2 – Rear bar/bumper removal
  • Disconnect the battery, pull up hard on the red tab of the positive terminal to disconnect.
  • Rear tail lights – You need to remove them to remove the rear bar. They’re each held on with one single 10mm nut from behind. If you haven’t removed the interior panels, simply pop open the rhombus shaped access cover on each side with a plastic trim remover. You’ll be able to put your hand in and feel towards the rear for the nut. Use a long extension socket to get to the nut, and be careful on removal not to drop the nut. It’ll be impossible to retrieve without a magnet on a stick, even harder if the whole panel isn’t off. Once the nut is free, gently push down on the plastic clip below the bolt, and wiggle the light assembly free. Once part way removed, disconnect the wiring plug by pressing down on the burled area – it can be a bit finicky. Once unplugged, remove light and store safely.
  • Remove the two torx screws (one on each side) visible from the open boot
  • Underneath the rear of the car is a plastic panel that you need to remove – it has four torx screws along the rear that connects the panel to the rear bar, and then four 10mm nuts that holds the panel on. You’ll need a long extension to reach two of them that are high up in the holes on the panel. Whilst you’re already on the ground, remove the four torx screws (two on each corner) of the rear bar, just behind the rear wheel. With the cover removed, you’ll also see a torx screw on each side of the car, mounted on the horizontal supporting the rear bar, which need to be removed.
  • Now you need to remove the wheel arch trim – Start by removing the three torx screws on the plastic wheel well plastic cover, behind the rear wheel. It will allow you to get your hand behind the arch trim, which is held on by a lot of plastic clips. The first five closest to the rear are moulded onto the trim panel, so you don’t want to break them. With your hand behind the wheel well cover, you can press in the tabs as you pull free the trim away from the car, reducing the risk of breaking anything. After those, the rest are all normal blue panel clips, so just carefully pull it further off. The trim only really needs to come halfway off, so you could leave it there, but you might find it easier to remove the whole thing. With the trim half off/removed, you have easier access to remove the fourth torx screw on the wheel well cover – this makes it easier to move the panel to the side, where you’ll find a 10mm nut on the top holding the whole rear bar to the body of the wheel. Repeat on the other side of the car. The rear bar should now be free of all screws/nuts and ready to remove.
  • To remove the whole bar, start at the bottom corner behind the wheel – pull the panel out and up, and it will start to release. Gently start moving up along the join prying it away from the car. Once you get to the area where the taillight was, two tabs should slide out, and one tab just needs to be pressed down with your finger to pop it out. Repeat the same on the other side, and now the whole rear bar should be free and start to slide away from the car.
  • At this point keep the bar supported, as it’s still connected to at least three (possibly more, depending on options like the kick sensor for the auto boot) wiring plugs. Remove these by pushing the orange tabs up, and then lifting the locking tab up, at which point the plug should slide out of the socket. Repeat on all connections. Congratulations, your rear bar is now free to put safely away to the side.
Stage 3 – Towbar Installation
  • Assuming you’re installing a towbar, at this point you should really follow the specific instructions supplied with that particular setup. But the next steps will generally align to all towbars.
  • You first need to scrape away the sealant that interferes with the fitment of the side brackets. Place the bracket in place on the existing bolts, and mark with a pen each end of the bracket on the sealant so you know how much needs to removed. It’s not exactly easy to remove by hand with a scraper or screwdriver – I found it faster to use an oscillating multitool with a scraper attachment fitted. You basically need to remove any of the sealant which prevents the bracket from sitting flush with the body of the car. Be sure to test fit to make sure you’ve cleaned enough away.
  • Mount the main towbar – remove the three specified 13mm bolts from each side of the anti-intrusion bar mount as per your instructions. Mount up the towbar and fit with the new bolts you’d have been supplied with. Check the instructions carefully, because you may find some of those bolts fit via the back, rather than the front. Fit all six bolts loosely, do not tighten at this point.
  • Fit the side brackets – mount the bracket loosely on the existing bolts, and then put the supplied bolts through the bracket to connect to the towbar. By keeping everything loose at this point, it ensures there’s enough wiggle room so everything lines up properly and is flush.
  • Tighten up your bracket bolts to the specified torque of your instructions, then tighten up the bolts/nuts on the main towbar. This required 13, 17 and 19mm sockets/spanners for my AutoHak brand towbar.
  • You’ll then need to mount up the tow hitch as per your instructions, and the bracket for your trailer wiring socket (again for AutoHak - 19mm bolts and nuts).
  • Mount up your trailer socket, and run the wiring loom along the bar to the left, up and over the anti-intrusion bar mount, along the side bracket. There’s an existing wiring grommet, which has enough room to fit the wiring harness. It’s easiest to cut an X into the grommet from above in the boot with a box cutter, and then feed your wiring loom up from the bottom. With your wiring harness in the boot, you can wire as per whatever instructions you have. I used a genuine factory harness, so it was mostly all plug and play into existing connections, with a full guide available.
  • So with the whole towbar and harness mounted, it’s time to cut out the rear bar to fit your towbar. Again you should have instructions for you towbar which specify exactly what dimensions you need. It’s easiest to apply some masking tape to the general area, and measure and draw where you need to cut on the tape. To make the cut, you can either use an oscillating multitool with a cutting blade (my preference), a jigsaw with a fine blade, or a Dremel tool with a cutting disc. My preferred trick is to leave the ends of the cut to last, so the panel holds in place until it’s almost all done (rather than flapping about). Test fit the rear bar to ensure it properly clears the towbar – enlarge the cut if necessary.
Stage 4 - Refitting
  • Now it’s basically reversing the whole process to reinstall everything. Reconnect the wiring plugs, put the rear bar roughly in place. Make sure the tabs under the tail light are properly aligned, and start pushing the bar back into place, moving from the tail light down towards the wheel. Repeat on the other side. Replace all the screws on the wheel well covers, put your screws back onto the corners and the two horizontal connections. Replace the bottom cover and all nuts and torx screws (Note - you probably cut away a section where one screw would have gone, so you should finish up with one spare torx screw, along with the six factory anti-intrusion bar bolts. If you have more, you’ve forgotten something somewhere!).
  • Refit your tail lights, not forgetting to connect the plugs. Refit your wheel arch trims, tapping them all the clips back into place – if you removed them completely, you’ll need to open the rear passenger doors to fit it properly. Everything for the exterior should now be back together.
  • Refit your interior trim pieces as required, same reverse process as for removal. Once you’re done, you’ll need to run along the inside lip of the boot seal, so it covers the edges of the panels you removed.
  • Wash your hands, and enjoy a nice cold drink. Hopefully it took you several less hours because you used this guide, rather than winging it with minimal references.

Congratulations, you’ve now successfully fitted your new towbar (or done whatever else you needed to remove the rear bumper). For wiring, you probably need to have the trailer connection activated in the ECU via DiagBox.

Extra note – despite them being the norm on any modern trailer, modern Peugeots still won’t support LED trailer lights as normal. It seems they’ve finally released a solution with an adaptor module for LED trailer lights (Part # 1675595980) available as a factory accessory. The alternate solution is either wire in some resistors in line with the plug on the trailer, or some caravans have a module available. The factory accessory is probably the best option though, as it should enable you to use any trailer without worrying about it. It just fits behind that left main boot panel.

Ignore me, it's just SEO for the benefit of others searching in the future – 2016 Peugeot 3008, 2017 Peugeot 3008, 2018 Peugeot 3008, 2019 Peugeot 3008, 2020 Peugeot 3008, 2021 Peugeot 3008, P84, Peugeot 5008, P87, Citroen C5 Aircross, Opel Grandland X, removing, removal, rear bumper, rear bar, towbar, install, installation, fitment, trailer wiring harness
How did you sort the wiring harness I just installed a towbar and I can't seem to sort out why the indicators and fog lights not working on the trailer light bar
 
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