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What paint are you using?

Old school 2-pack likes to be warm. Modern water based paints rely more on airflow.

Personally I am not a fan of heaters and spray paint, especially in a confined space.

Would they do the job? Yes, if you were just looking use them as general purpose heaters to get the room temp up before painting, and had time to let your paint cure when you were done.

I wouldn't want to light one up in a solvent heavy atmosphere.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
yeah wont be having them on when painting or soon after, will be painting with doors open then after the vapor has gone them out them on to help it cure.

not sure what paint yet, i know its going to be out of a can, im a mechanic not a painter but thought id give it a shot for a laugh ;)

alos not sure what colour to do the wheels yet, my 307 is the light gray ally colour (code - ezr) and suggestions??

cheers
 

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Whatever you decide to use, don't go too dark. It will look crap.

Dark wheels on light cars really sink into the arches in my (very humble!) opinion.

They need to be big for that to work.

I would go for something a few shades darker than the body if the wheels are stock.

Peugeot seem to have the knack of choosing standard alloys that actually look decent to begin with, I would not change too much.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
yeah i had thought about that, black would look pants, but so would white...was going to go for a graffite/gun metal grey ... :/

thats if i ever get round to rubbing them down, only got 1 done....4 to go :/ any tips?
 

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If you have the budget, I wouldn't bother painting them in the first place.

Shot blast then powder coat is the recommended route.


If you are stuck with the DIY route then:

1/ Rubber, including valve, off the rim. Any silicon near your paint will result in fisheyes. Same goes for oil and grease.

2/ Clean, clean, clean. Loose crap off, scuff off the shine. No need to go to bare metal. Clean again. Wipe with thinners a few minutes before you paint to make sure its clean.

3/ Prime. Preferably with a high build self etch primer. I don't want to sound like a tit, but follow the instructions on the can with regards to flash times between layers, drying time etc.

4/ If you have any runs, high spots or dust, let it dry, then fix it with a high grit paper.

5/ Paint, keep a wet edge, thinner coats built up is better than fewer thick ones. Again, your can will tell you.

6/ If you are using paint that needs no clear coat, you are done. You can fix imperfections later with a high grit paper and a polish.

7/ If you are using a lacquer, repeat step 5...

The secret is cleanliness and patience. Personally I never use rattle cans unless I am stuck for a colour match, or it is a small repair like a wing mirror, but I have used cans a few times and can achieve decent results.

I find it is worth getting them from a proper spray paint supplier rather than a motor factor.

Generally the nozzles are better, spray pattern is better, and pressure is more consistent through the whole can.
 
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