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Discussion Starter #1
Being a lazy cheap skate with dodgy back I'm looking at buying one of these manual oil suction devices.

Bung it in the dipstick, suck out all the oil, and change filter.

Has anybody here used one of these - are they any good and can you actually get the suction pipe right down into the sump?

Ta chaps/chapesses
 

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Sorry but this seems like the crappest thing I've heard of in a long time! For a start the sump plug is on the lowest part of the pan to ensure it drains properly so the chances of this sort of thing draining the sump fully seems slim! Surely you have a mate who could take the sump bung out for you to do it right? Secondly have you ever taken the oil filter off your car yet? If its a hdi engine most of them are fairly hard to remove because of the shape they sit so the sump plug may be the least of your problems! Sounds like a waste of money to me mate!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Apparently - the new merc's and bm's don't have sump plugs. Servicing time, the oil is sucked out - food for thought.

The more I google this - this more I am leaning towards this approach.
 

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Hmm. Personally I like to make sure as much of the old crappy oil is out as possible but each to their own! If you do go for it let me know how good you find it!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Will do.

I thought that a load of oil would be left in the sump as well - but as was pointed out in another forum - the sump plug is on the side of the sump - it is a good inch or so (in old money) above the bottom of the sump - so some oil will always remain in the sump. The suction tube takes out all the oil - including that which is below the level of the sump plug - makes sense to me.
 

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Its not recommended to use manual oil suction devices on hdi engines ..The last few turbo failures i've seen on Hdi's the owners were using these suction devices...:eek:
Sludge is created in the sump when the old and new oil mix this inturn blocks the pump intake....I'd rather just drop the old oil from the sump and let it drain well before filling with new oil.....:)
Ron.
 

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clanless said:
Will do.

I thought that a load of oil would be left in the sump as well - but as was pointed out in another forum - the sump plug is on the side of the sump - it is a good inch or so (in old money) above the bottom of the sump - so some oil will always remain in the sump. The suction tube takes out all the oil - including that which is below the level of the sump plug - makes sense to me.
All the sump plugs I've seen are always the lowest part of the sump regardless of whether they are to one side or not. Generally the sump will have a dip or recess in it where the plug is located to ensure it is the lowest part.
Also not a big fan of the suction method, but I think this is probably more to do with the application of the device. If you're doing it on your own car (and you know what you're doing), you are more likely to spend the time getting it right making sure all the sludge is out. Problem is you're never really going to know for sure with a pump. With a plug, it's pretty hard to get it wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Its not recommended to use manual oil suction devices on hdi engines ..The last few turbo failures i've seen on Hdi's the owners were using these suction devices...

You sure that's not just coincidence?

Sludge is created in the sump when the old and new oil mix this inturn blocks the pump intake....I'd rather just drop the old oil from the sump and let it drain well before filling with new oil.....

Can't believe this - what happens when you top up used oil with new oil - does this form sludge?
 

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clanless said:
Its not recommended to use manual oil suction devices on hdi engines ..The last few turbo failures i've seen on Hdi's the owners were using these suction devices...

You sure that's not just coincidence?

Sludge is created in the sump when the old and new oil mix this inturn blocks the pump intake....I'd rather just drop the old oil from the sump and let it drain well before filling with new oil.....

Can't believe this - what happens when you top up used oil with new oil - does this form sludge?
I bit of light reading based on the Dv6 (1.6 hdi) engine.




OIL CHANGE PROCEDURE ON ALL DV6 ENGINES

It is necessary to follow a specific oil change procedure on all DV6 and DV6U engines so as to ensure that no used oil remains to mix with the new oil.

The following method must be used:

• The engine oil temperature must be at least 50°C :
- the engine oil temperature is considered to be at 50°C when the water temperature indicator is between 80°C and 90°C or the cooling fan has cut in
• ensure that the vehicle is level (side to side and fore and aft)
• remove the oil filter to allow the circuit to drain completely
• remove the oil filler cap and the dipstick
• remove the drain plug
• allow the oil to drain by gravity for at least 10 minutes (DO NOT USE SUCTION METHODS)
• fit a new oil filter
• refit the drain plug with a new sealing washer
• fill the engine with quantity of oil recommended for the engine
• refit the oil filler cap and the dipstick
• run the engine at idle until the oil pressure warning lamp goes out (about 1 minute)
• wait 5 minutes
• check the oil level using the dipstick: the level should be as close as possible to, but not exceeding the maximum mark (1) so as to be between (1) and (3)

For information, the lower mark (2) = Min (0%) the upper mark (1) = Max (100%) the intermediate mark (3) = ¾
4 of 4

CONSEQUENCES OF NOT KEEPING TO THE OIL CHANGE INTERVALS

If the customer does not have the oil changed at the recommended intervals, the oil will become excessively polluted and will no longer ensure the correct lubrication of the engine. One of the first consequences is inadequate lubrication of the turbocharger bearings causing a failure which is repeated after the turbocharger is replaced. Subsequent symptoms resulting from the reduced level of lubrication will be a noisy engine and then destruction of the engine.

We remind you that if the customer does not keep to the servicing intervals recommended in the Maintenance and Guarantee Guide, the customer will be responsible for the durability of the mechanical parts of the engine.
In this case, the any related repairs needed are not covered by the new vehicle warranty.

CONSEQUENCES OF NOT FOLLOWING THE OIL CHANGE PROCEDURE

If the oil changes are not done as described above, all deposits of old oil will not be removed and will very quickly pollute the new oil, accelerating the ageing of the oil in the engine lubrication circuit (even causing the oil to congeal).

The consequences for the engine are the same as if the oil change intervals are not observed. As a result, any related repairs needed are not covered under the new vehicle warranty.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Fair 'nuf.

Where did you get this text from - a dealers service manual?

Still don't buy that mixing old and new oil leads to sludge.

I'm going to use the suction method - I'll take the risk.
 

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clanless said:
Fair 'nuf.

Where did you get this text from - a dealers service manual?

Still don't buy that mixing old and new oil leads to sludge.

I'm going to use the suction method - I'll take the risk.
Depends on what engine you have...?..the 1.6 hdi tend to cause
more problems with sludge build up ....the 2.0 seem more rebust... :)

Afaik the text has been put together by Psa due to common turbo failure on the dv6 engine.
Maybe use your suction method with every second service...:)
 

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Still think it's easier to just take the plug off.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Goin with the every other approach - normal then suction.

What a stupid design for a sump plug - luckily i had an m8 hex bit in my meagre tool box.

Had to use the car jack to lift up the wrench as the plug was so tight.

Anyway - dun now.

Handy hint - Quickco do oil at 13 quid a bottle - Halfords equivalent is 22 squid.
 

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In 1969, I had a Ford Anglia and I went to the garage on the A4 opposite the exit from Heathrow and what is now the Heathrow Spur motorway. They were offering an oil change for about £5. I agreed to this and a guy went out with a glorified vacuum cleaner and stuck the tube into the dipstick hole, changed the filter and poured in the new oil.

I was a bit wary of this but he assured me that it was 100% OK. Anyhoo, I then drove the 200 miles to Hull and checked the oil - the stuff was black! I suspect it had acted as a flushing oil.

Oil and filters have moved on a bit in the last 40 years but despite Mercedes endorsing the idea - perhaps they have a specially designed sump(?) and filter - I don't think I'd trust it.
 
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