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Hi, My 407 has developed a noisy parcel shelf, every bump I go over makes it rattle, I can't see any obvious way of tightening it to stop the up and down movement making it rattle. Any suggestions.
 

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Noisey Parcel Shelf

Robbob24 sorry to say my 407 has the same issue any help appreciated guys. The shelf rattles all the time you can see it in the rear view mirror flapping up an down.
 

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Just had a report from Peugeot regarding the noisy parcel shelf
The brackets are broken and a new shelf is required £202.69
I'm going to turn the radio up
 

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£200 !!!!!! Daylight robbery. Im going to look for some plastic screws with large heads and screw the shelf down thru to the boot. Everything you touch on these cars has a serious price tag. I need a chrome trim piece for the front bumper nearside Peugeot dont sell the chrome strip separately got to buy the trim piece complete £50.
 
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I think a couple of strategically placed dabs of grab adhesive should cure it a treat. Easy. PS. I collected a pair of spare front bumper mouldings for £14. Sure beats the £200 that BMW wanted for one back when I had a bimmer. If my memory serves the corresponding trim bit for my exes Audi A4 was also about £50. A conspiracy? Broadly speaking (with the odd exception) the parts and service items for my 407 cost on a par with most other brands of car I've owned, with Vauxhall being the only brand who consistently aced them. There are plenty of legitimate outlets for genuine parts other than the dealers, so it pays to know where to go, or else have your connections.
 

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My luggage area cover was missing the 2 rods nearer the rear seat. Inspired by the above posts, I assembled
1. Junior hacksaw
2. 2mm drill
3. drill same size as M6 coachbolt (6mm?)
4. Sharp centre punch or similar (e.g. a nail)
5. M6 x 80mm coach bolt (NOT the type with a square below the head)
6. 2 M6 hex nuts + 4 washers
7. Small length of rubber/neoprene pipe, internal diameter a little less than M6, external diameter approx 13.5mm (I’ve got a load in my shed.) The max external diameter you want is about 14mm or 15mm if you make the rods a little shorter.

I first sawed of the remains of the broken rod flush with the surface. This leaves behind the mould marks of the rod which have points at 3, 6, 9 and 12 o’clock, so you can mark the centre easily with the punch or similar so as to prevent the drill skipping about. Do NOT use a hammer to tap the punch, pressing and twisting just to mark it is enough.

Using the 2mm drill as a pilot, I drilled all the way through. The unit is hollow but has 2 strengthening ribs inside; you have to go through those too. With a little care, the pilot hole came out more or less at the centre point on the far side.

I repeated this with the 6mm drill, pushed the coachbolt through as shown, tightened up the nut and pushed a piece of the piping over the thread. Result! No banging and rattling – total cost 50p for coachbolts, washers and nuts.

FWIW, you’ll see that the original rods have a conical rubber/neoprene fitting that is loose and rotates. I can’t see the point of that, other than it might grip the sides.

I found that there was a 6mm gap between the block and the pocket into which the rod fits; that’s why the hex nuts were used as the square nuts that come with coachbolts are too thin, generally unsuitable and don't hold as well as hex nuts against the plastic.

The pockets themselves are conical too. At 25mm from the block, the max diameter of the pocket is 15mm.

PS, if you’re using a battery powered electric drill, check to see that at least one of the batteries has a decent charge… I didn’t.
 

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