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After my last lot of repairs to the FAP system(replace the fuel cap switch, fill Regen fluid & unearthing the emission ECU), I was left with only the Glow plugs to replace.

Unfortunately, according to Peugeot Planet, my FAP filter was over 88% blocked, indicating that I needed to either have the glow plugs replaced shortly (so that I could force a regen) or remove the filter and wash it out.

My prefered option is to take my car to David (Ireland), but he is over 2 hours away, and my wife is due any day now, so that idea was delayed. I tried several local, but none of them had any experience replacing the glow plugs in the 307.

I was left with cleaning the FAP filter.

After watch a couple of youtube videos, and climbing underneath to have a look myself, it seamed a simple job. How wrong could I be!

To be honest, it should be a fairly easy job, except that I hit two major obstacles:

  1. The lower differential sensor tube fitting had binded & seized; and
  2. The giant hose clamp thingy that secures the FAP filter to the catalytic converter also binded & seized.
Both of these were stainless on stainless threads and assembled without any anti-seize grease. (a capital offence in some trades)

A few calls to a couple of the local wrecker yards, were unsuccessful at providing a replacement clamp or sensor tubing.

I ended up taking the car to a backyard mechanic, that suggested I take out the entire cat & FAP filter assembly, to make it easier to work on.

That all came out easy enough, but I still ended up shearing of the hose clamp bolt and I left the sensor tube fitting alone.

The filter was actually quite clean, so why the high reading? The answer is simple:

The seized sensor tube fitting wasn't sealing the tube. In fact, the tube freely spun around and could slide in and out by about 1/4 of an inch. This air leak created the false readings.

After washing out the filter and reassembling the entire system (I used a long, standard hose clamp found in Halfords as a temp. fix), I'm left with a few more jobs to do.

  1. Fix the clamp, or buy a new one from Peugeot, or find a second hand one;
  2. Find someone who can silver solder the stainless steel sensor tube to the seized stainless steel fitting, to seal the air leak;
A small word of advice: If your ever assembling stainless to stainless threaded parts, always use a anti-seize grease.

A quick question:

If the regen keeps failing, because the ECU sees the filter not clearing, could that result in a fault message appearing for the glow plugs?
 

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A quick question:

If the regen keeps failing, because the ECU sees the filter not clearing, could that result in a fault message appearing for the glow plugs?
If the regen kept failing or aborting you'd probably see a fault in the engine ECU along the lines of maximum amount of aborted regens reached, but I wouldn't have thought you would see a glow plug unless your plugs were actually borked. My 307 currently has the glow plug fault logged but still regens (most recent regen was when the filter was around 85% blocked), so ideally you'll want to get the sensor sorted. Once the ECU gets accurate readings you can go from there.
 
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