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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi All,

So yesterday I finally got around to upgrading the lighting in my new 308's car boot. The boot light that came in my car pointed down, and was no use whatsoever, even when I replaced the standard bulb with a high wattage LED. So I decided to put my own lights in.

This guide is very photo heavy, sorry if you still have slow broadband :)

Here are the LED's that I used: LED Bars

They are Ultra Bright, and they look pretty sturdy. I have a photo of them with one lit up. This should give you an idea of the size. Its hard to see how bright they are in the light as they are pure white.



They have been mounted in my boot, under the plastic trim that supports the parcel shelf, at a 45 degree angle. I did not want them to point straight down, or straight into the boot, so as to increase the light.

They have been connected to the wires that lead to the standard boot light, so they only come on when the boot is opened.

Here is a basic wiring diagram that I scribbled to give you a rough idea of how they are connected.

You can see that I have used Scotch Locks (wire tap connectors) to attach the LED's to the boot light cables. I would like to note here that I would never recommend to use these connectors on an external wire, such at bonnet or underside. Nor would I recommend to use them on any critical / safety devices, such as Headlights, or Wipers etc...

The reason for this is that they damage the insulation on the wire to make the connection.

I believe they are perfectly safe however for use in situations such as this, in which they are not likely to get moved around much. I had my foot well LED's connected to my cabin light in my old 207 with scotch locks for 4 years without having an issue.



For this project you will need the following equipment:

2 x Scotch Lock Connectors (Red)
10 x Insulated Female Spade Connectors (Red)
10 x Insulated Male Spade Connectors (Red)
1 x 5M of insulated speaker cable. 1mm should do.
10 x Cable Ties
2 x LED Bars (as linked above)

Anyway, I will show the procedure below and hopefully it will inspire someone.
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
OK,

So first thing I noticed was that these LED bars, although otherwise constructed quite well, the very end of the wires next to the Bar, looked very thin and fragile.

These couple of steps are not required, however if your LED bars look like mine, I would recommend it.

Here are the LED bars with the wires as standard.



You can see what I mean about the wires above. I resolved this issue using some Heat Shrink Tubing. I needed a rather large piece to attach to the end of the LED bar, and as such, it did not grip the cable insulation.



So then I put a smaller piece on the wire insulation, and tucked the large piece inside.

When they were both done, they looked much better and felt much stronger.



Now that I was happy with the LED Bars, I started looking in the boot area at how to mount and connect them.

I pulled the light out of its fitting to reveal the wires. The mesh area around the light fitting is where the LED's will be mounted.

I thought of various different ways of mounting these LED's on the mesh. To achieve the 45 degree angle. In the end I settled with putting a couple of cable ties on the mesh before attaching the LED's. I put half of the LED bars on the cable ties, and the other half on the mesh. This provided the correct angle for the LED bars. I then cable tied around the whole assembly to hold the LED's bars in place.

 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I peeled back the wrapping on the wires, so I had room to attach the scotch locks. Unfortunately the knife that I used for this was a little too sharp, and I cut through one of the wires. I repaired this by attaching male / female spade connectors to the 2 ends of the broken wires. I will at some point go back, cut the spade connectors off, splice in some new wire by soldering it and shrink wrap it, just to keep it tidy. But for now, just checking my boot light still works after the mishap.



Once I checked that my light was still working, I attached the scotch locks to the boot light wires. The scotch locks were connected to 2 wires (POS and GND) with a female spade connector on each wire. I then had 2 smaller wires that each had a male connector on one end, and 2 female connectors on the other. This acted as a Y-Splitter so I could connect both LED bars in parallel.

I put male spade connectors on the wires attached to the LED bars next.

I tested that everything was working properly, by connecting the LED bars. They worked perfectly. In this picture, the boot light was actually on, which gives you an idea of how bright the LED bars are in comparison.



At this stage, I was looking at cable routing, and how best to get the wire from one side to another. Whilst doing so, I noticed that the trim that supports the parcel shelf comes off rather easily. If you get hold of the plastic trim near the boot, and give it a sharp pull, it will clip off. Then you work your way around the pillar to the rear door and it falls off nice and easy.

Here you can see the connectors that I used, including the Y-Splitter and scotch locks. Complete with the trim removed around the boot.



I ran the wires down the carpet on the side of the boots, and under the fasteners for the rear seats. This keeps the wire out of way when removing the spare wheel etc, so it does not get snagged at all. I cut the wire to the right length and put the relevant spade connectors on each end of the wire.

 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I fitted the trim again, once done with the wire routing. And mounted the LED bars on the trim. The 45 degree angle idea with cable ties worked perfectly. The LED bars are solid in their place and are unlikely to ever move until the cable ties are cut.



I fastened the spade connectors for the left LED bar and pulled the wire through to get rid of any slack.

As it happens, I took the slack up in an access panel cut out in the carpet. The spade terminals were at just the right length to be left in here safely. This should make it easy if I ever have to disconnect for any reason. Also once the carpet cut out is put back in, there is no visible wiring or connectors.

I also put a cable tie around the wires here, to stop any tugging on the cable (as unlikely as it was with where it was routed) from being able to unplug the spade connectors. You can see how in this picture.



At this point they were all mounted, and all visible cables were hidden out of the way.

I decided to take the LED out of the actual boot light, as it was partially covered by the LED bar I had just fitted. And it was crap anyway.

I am extremely pleased with how this project turned out. All the cables are safely routed and well hidden, the LED bars are very well fastened, and are not visible unless you are actually looking for them. And as I said before, the brightness is just brilliant.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
And here are the finished results...

The first two photos are taken from a crouching view to show the LED bars. Again, these are not visible when you are stood up to access the boot.

In my opinion LED's look infinitely better when you cannot see the LED itself, just the light it produces. And this is a perfect example.

Left LED bar working: (Note this was actually taken in daytime, and is still bright)



Right LED bar working: (Again, taken in daytime)



Boot view at night: (Tail lights were on here as I only just unlocked the car)



Side boot view: (This was taken at about 23:00 yesterday. The boot is extremely well lit, almost daytime bright. Compared to the rest of the photo which is pitch black.)



Anyway, as I said, I am really happy with the results and I hope this can help / inspire others add a bit more light to their boot!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hi Paul; well you've been busy.

That looks a good fix. :thumb:

The night photos show the benefit. :camera:

Al.

PS: ...any link for the LED strips....:light:
Hi Mate,

Yeah, thanks. Only took me a an hour or so. The link is in the very first part of this post. They only cost a couple of quid, so I am unsure how long they will last. But they don't come on often really. And they are removable easy enough. So if they die, I can easily replace them with some more expensive ones.
 

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Ah, yes. Missed it looking at the photos.

I don't know how they can make these things so cheaply!


Al.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
When you only pay your workers rice, its easy to manufacture things cheap.

I have just seen a question on here regarding rear door 'puddle lights', thats got me thinking about my next project. I haven't got any 'puddle lights' on my car.

Again, Ill pop a guide up if it happens :D
 

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Hi Paul,
Haven't been looking in for a while .Last time I was here you were about to start this job and what a job you've done . Brilliant...and so well documented ,I think its even something I could do if I follow your guide . You've done the forum a great service .
Well done ..
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the kind words people. It amazes me that its 2015 and my car has a 7 inch touchscreen car computer built in, but still has a crappy candle bulb installed on one side to light the boot! Car manufacturers are missing a trick here!

Also, these LED bars are still going, bright as ever. I was a bit worried due to the price to start with, however they are working fine still! :thumb:
 

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led upgrade

do you think this would work on the 308 sw huge boot does suffer from poor lighting I am on holiday this week and I am now feeling inspired to try this:lol:
 

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The simplest method for improved light is to swap the bulb for an LED in a standard boot.

http://www.peugeotforums.com/forums/308-2014-122/led-suggestions-new308-200010/index8.html (see posts #75 and #76)

However, for a larger boot area, or where you need a much brighter light, then this LED strip method is well worth considering and should give ample light.

I would definitely do this modification in a 308SW.

Al.


PS: Have a look at Paul's photos in #5 on page 1.


.
 

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led boot light update on 308sw

ok I am now inspired to improve the lighting in my sw as the standard light is about as much use as a blown out candle have all the connectors wire and cable ties just waiting on led bars to be delivered cant wait will take before and after photos but not sure how to upload them to the page but will persevere
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Sorry all, been away for a while.

The electric's here would certainly work in an SW and would likely be very similar.

The way you mount the LED's may be different depending on the trim, I am yet to see the inside back on an SW.

Also, the LED bar's are still going strong!
 
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