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Discussion Starter #1
Hi people,

I have been getting an intermittent starting issue with my 308 diesel. It has recently had its yearly service, so had oil change, oil filter fluids etc. I changed the cambelt a couple weeks ago too. It's had a small oil leak ever since I've had it but never needed topping up in about 2 years.

It is having a starting issue where it won't start on the first attempt, it will crank and almost start before cutting out. I have tried turning ignition on and off but doesn't make any difference. After the first failed attempt at starting, it will fire up and drive fine. This only happens after the engine has been sitting for a while such as overnight or several hours, it will fire right up when warm. The battery is only about a year old so should still be good.

I have checked codes and have only 1 code which is:
P1351 IDM input circuit Malfunction/Ignition coil control circuit High voltage
Don't know if this has anything to do with my current issue. I am going on holiday in 2 weeks which is going to be a 4-5 hour drive and this concerns me. I also replaced the camshaft and crankshaft sensors about 6 months ago as I was getting random engine cut outs while driving and this seems to have resolved that issue.

Is anybody here able to shed some light on this?

Thanks for your help!
Scott
 

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Don't see how an ignition coil fault could have anything to do with a diesel.

It's possible you have a small air leak into the fuel system allowing air in when it's been standing for a time. Did you move the fuel pipes when you did the cam belt?

Do you have a priming bulb on yours? If so try pumping that a couple of times before starting. If it feels soft at first then ayou probably have got a bit of air in there.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Don't see how an ignition coil fault could have anything to do with a diesel.

It's possible you have a small air leak into the fuel system allowing air in when it's been standing for a time. Did you move the fuel pipes when you did the cam belt?

Do you have a priming bulb on yours? If so try pumping that a couple of times before starting. If it feels soft at first then ayou probably have got a bit of air in there.
Hi Brian,

Thanks for your thoughts, no I didn't move the fuel pipes or anything, I had enough accessibility to access the cambelt without needing to move anything. Yes mine does have a fuel priming pump, I will give this a try in the morning see if it helps. If there is air in the fuel system how do I go about locating the leak and fixing it or is this a job for a mechanic?
 

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The old way was to smear grease on the fuel hose at joints, but that might not be so easy. It stops air getting in, not fuel getting out.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The old way was to smear grease on the fuel hose at joints, but that might not be so easy. It stops air getting in, not fuel getting out.
Well i don't want to count my chickens yet but it hasn't done it in a couple of days, I primed the diesel pump as you said and it fired right up and has done so each time since. I was running low on fuel at the time (fuel light was on) don't know if that would cause these issues i.e. not enough fuel could be pulled into the engine to start it? I'll keep an eye on it and keep you updated.
 

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Let me guess... you also park your car on a slope? You should never run low on fuel, the fuel light isn't a reminder to fill up... it's a reminder to let you know that you are about to break down.

When low on fuel, depending on the orientation, you can suck air into the system causing the problems you've had.
 

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Let me guess... you also park your car on a slope? You should never run low on fuel, the fuel light isn't a reminder to fill up... it's a reminder to let you know that you are about to break down.

When low on fuel, depending on the orientation, you can suck air into the system causing the problems you've had.
Hi BiGK,

Thanks for sharing your thoughts, I am hoping this was the issue however to answer your question no I don't park on a slope, the ground is flat everywhere I park. I can't remember how long I was having the issue in relation to the fuel getting low but this seems to be the only thing I can prove links to. Time will tell. Would this indicate a fault with the fuel pump or other fault if air was able to get into the system?
 
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