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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
90364


Currently, forgetting the background of this car, I need advice on what you see without judgement.

The right > rear wheel is clearly stuck up ∆ giving some hang time.

Having a look under the rear end I see rust. Mostly surface rust but some areas are worse, notably the right hand side. So, my only thought on this failure would be rusted shock mounts? Can rust really be this strong to actually "freeze" the movement of the shock at the joint?

Would love to hear feedback on this. What you see, any past experiences of such an issue?

I will be interested to read what others suggest on this. I am stuck.
 

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Its more likely the trailing arm bearings have failed OR very very rarely a snapped torsion bar.

Unbolt & remove the shock - it will prove if its the shock or the trailing arm at fault.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Its more likely the trailing arm bearings have failed OR very very rarely a snapped torsion bar.

Unbolt & remove the shock - it will prove if its the shock or the trailing arm at fault.
I checked the torsion bar, it seems to be intact. The trailing arm bearings though.. would that be bad, if they had rusted I mean? Would it be a new axle job or to simply bash the arm into submission, freeing up the rust and hopefully getting the movement back?

Also, I can't see any rear springs. Am I correct in saying this rear end only has dampers?

(1995, 1.6l, petrol, manual)
 

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Its the torsion bars that do the spring function on the rear of a 306 ( & lots of older Peugeot products )

The torsion bar basically twists along its length & acts as a spring.

If its a failed bearing then a rear axle rebuild might save it.

I'd unbolt & remove the shock absorber first to see if the trailing arm is free to move.

That would prove if the fault is a siezed shock OR a siezed trailing arm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The torsion bars are the springs in this suspension setup.

Ah I see, thank you. Would this mean when I remove that (potentially) seized damper the whole wheel assembly could possibly release downwards under the tension of the torsion bar? (Assuming the damper really is the culprit here..)
 

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That car has definitely got seized radius arm bearings, nothing to do with dampers or torsion bars.
I’ve worked with Peugeot’s for many years, this is a known problem, done numerous axle jobs.
My suggestion is an exchange rear axle, in the UK we have a number of firms that can supply an overhauled unit ready to fit. Your best bet is to find a GOOD used rear axle.
Don’t consider overhauling yours. When the bearings break up and seize, the radius arm shaft will be damaged, also the main cross tube can also get damaged where the bearing sits.
 

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This is an image of one I did years ago, I hope it will give you an idea of what I`m describing. The yellow cross tube has four radius bearings, one at each end and two in the middle. The radius arms (on the floor) are inserted into the tube.
Vehicle Machine Auto part
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
This is an image of one I did years ago, I hope it will give you an idea of what I`m describing. The yellow cross tube has four radius bearings, one at each end and two in the middle. The radius arms (on the floor) are inserted into the tube. View attachment 90373

WOW!!! Thank you so much! Your response has been very helpful. I think I might need to rethink this car. The exhaust is rusted, entirely, the entire rear end is full of rust, the engine is overheating (sitting at 110⁰c) and I am sure there is more which I haven't yet discovered. This could be the end of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
That car has definitely got seized radius arm bearings, nothing to do with dampers or torsion bars.
I’ve worked with Peugeot’s for many years, this is a known problem, done numerous axle jobs.
My suggestion is an exchange rear axle, in the UK we have a number of firms that can supply an overhauled unit ready to fit. Your best bet is to find a GOOD used rear axle.
Don’t consider overhauling yours. When the bearings break up and seize, the radius arm shaft will be damaged, also the main cross tube can also get damaged where the bearing sits.
What is the most common cause for the damaged bearing?
 

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Age and design. They have a finite life before needing replacement.
 

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Some owners fit grease nipples so they can grease the bearings.

The axle really needs to be dismantled first to do this as the swarf generated by drilling / tapping to fit the grease nipple if it isn't cleaned out will destroy the bearings.
 

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What is the most common cause for the damaged bearing?
Lack of long term lubrication, the grease dry`s up, water gets in, needle rollers get rusty and breakup.
As Mr Lee has mentioned if the axle came with grease nipples the radius bearings could be regularly lubricated.

By the way, It sounds as if its the end to your trusty old 306.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Lack of long term lubrication, the grease dry`s up, water gets in, needle rollers get rusty and breakup.
As Mr Lee has mentioned if the axle came with grease nipples the radius bearings could be regularly lubricated.

By the way, It sounds as if its the end to your trusty old 306.

Not so trusty to be honest. Scrapped now.
 
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