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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
Please bear with me on this tale of woe..I’m getting nowhere slowly and expensively, usually attached to a tow truck. I live in northern spain, am getting no results from the local workshops and feel I am getting backed into a corner from which I can only escape with a blank cheque and a sore bottom.

This is a 307 HDi16 SW 2005 estate, bought second hand in 2009.

1) February 2012:
It just stopped running: briefly came up the message “baja presión motor aceite” translated as “low engine oil pressure”…assuming that the french to spanish warning messages are translated correctly. About 15 minutes later the car could be restarted again. Oil level was fine.
2) This happened again shortly afterwards, we took it to the local workshop who changed the crankshaft sensor out of (admittedly) lack of any idea what to do. Their OBD showed messages about low fuel pressure.
3) It died again on the motorway so off it went on the tow truck to the Peugeot dealer. They changed the fusebox (corrosion apparently...), fuel pressure sensor and fuel filter.
I then kicked myself for not having suspecting a blocked fuel filter, especially since I had experienced the same “engine death followed by a later restart” years ago in a previous life with my Landrover running on dodgy roadside diesel.
Since then the car has run ok.
4) December 2012. On the way to the local airport, just before arriving (about 4 minutes before parking) I could just feel some firing hesitation in the engine, but it was so windy at the time that I hoped it was the wind!
5) A week later I started the car in the airport parking. It started ok, ran for about 20 seconds then died. I’m a bit old school and have the idea that if a diesel engine stops it has run out of diesel. I assumed (wrongly) that the lift pump was electric. Tow truck to local garage.
6) Local garage bled the system using the hand squeeze pump on top of the engine and it started ok.
7) Week later it died again, I bled it for a long time, wouldn’t start. It does seem like it is empty, I can hear fuel noises in the tube indicating air bubbles. Tow truck to Peugeot dealer again.
8) Peugeot dealer claimed the high pressure pump needed replacing (£1200 reconditioned, £1400 new) and that the diesel was an unusual green colour. I was not convinced.
9) Got the car towed to a diesel specialist who at least could fix the pump if necessary. They confirmed there was nothing wrong with the pump.
They “put a clear tube on the fuel pipes to see if there was any air moving in there” and they saw some coming from the tank and so dismantled and cleaned the fuel tank level metering mechanism, which they said was dirty. I can't see for the life of me any logic in this but "spain is different" as they like to say here when they are excusing incompetence/corruption.
The diesel was cloudy so they cleaned the tank and changed the fuel filter.
10) On the way home it died again, this time with the “low engine oil pressure” warning of item 1). I assume this is a red herring that comes up simply because the engine has stopped. After 15 mins of pumping the bulb I gave up and got the tow truck (on speed dial by now) back home to look at it myself.
11) I opened up the tank and found that the outlet to the engine was a clear pipe. The return was a black pipe. I assume the clear pipe is what the workshop left on. I squeezed the bulb a few times and the engine started.
Under no circumstances could I get air bubbles to appear in the supply pipe from the tank: I had to almost take off the quick-fit connector before it would suck in any air, so can assume the issue is further up the chain.
12) Drove to a shady spot today with a good book and sat in the car with it idling for 1 hour and 45 minutes. No problem.

So, I have several questions for the worldly wise.
I assume a sensor will detect a lack of incoming low pressure fuel and switch off the engine for you? It won’t go on working until it cannot actually combust enough to run? Correct?
Once this has been detected, is there a delay or there just has to be enough incoming fuel pressure to allow firing?
I understand the lift pump is integrated into the high pressure pump?
I saw a video of someone checking the return flow from the injectors with four bottles...is this worth a try?

Since the problem appears during real driving rather than idling does this point more to a fault with the high pressure pump or some faulty check valve?

It appears most people have an OBD on this forum...(although I sell ones for motorcycles) I didn’t realise they were so cheap for cars until I started looking yesterday.
I can see the next step must be to get one and monitor sensor values until it dies and hope there is a clue there. If so, recommendations for an OBD?

Well, thanks in advance for reading to the end of the post, and further thanks for anyone that can suggest anything more I can do,
Regards
Steve
 

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Hi and welcome, I confess I cannot help with your problem but I feel for you and it will get you back to the top:thumb:
 

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You can change the language on the display. So if you feel more comfortable with English do it. If the garage wants to see it in Spanish then change it back again for them.
It does sound as if you need to hook the car up to Planet to see what is going on. This does sound like an sporadic fault . As I understand it that once the “Planet” is plugged in you can also monitor various functions.
I maybe teaching someone to suck eggs, but did you know that Spanish insurance also covers you for removal from the road side using tow trucks. They will also help out when you have broken down or after an accident.
Where in Northern Spain are you?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks. I am in Gijón, Asturias.

I have changed the language to english, not that I need it, just that the translation may be better.
So far the insurers Zurich have been great, but they only cover a truck to a location, I've had to pay to move between workshops as you are not allowed to use a tow rope here. Still, I am surprised they have not drawn a line yet!

I've decided I need to deal with this myself. I used to live in South Africa and we used to say "you can fix it yourself, or you can take it to a workshop and then fix it yourself".

I am looking for an OBD now, but they all seem to state they are dodgy for 2004+ 307! So if you can recommend one....?

So once I've got that and an inverter for the laptop, lots of sandwiches and a tent, I'll be driving until it dies to get some sensor feedback.

I could do with some advice about what sensors may cause the ECU to decide to stop the engine dead in its tracks.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
low engine oil pressure. That's where I'd start.
Note that this only came up on the display AFTER the engine died.
I have since assumed this was an anomaly in the brief period after the engine died as of course engine off...no oil pressure.
The warning has never come on in normal use.
If there was a pump issue, would you not expect it on idle when hot?

Or are you suggesting a dodgy sensor? Would that cause a shutoff rather than a warning?

Thanks.
 

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torvista I am not a million km (miles away from you).
I do not know if your Spanish is up to it, but there is a Foro for Peugeots. I have been reading the posts to see if anyone in Asturias has a Planet. Sorry to say I cannot readily see if there is.
This section covers diagnostics.

Gibbo Had a look at the link.
It states
Retail price: $99.00 (with a line through it)
Buy it Now: $107.00
-8% off you save $-8.00
Makes me feel something has been lost in translation. :)
To use the kit I suppose you still have to download Planet and activate it.
I also read on this forum that Lexia was fro cars built after 2011. I assumed that older cars could not be read using Lexia. Learnt something new now.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
After getting an OBD and in desperation spending much time fixing the (unrelated) faults that WERE logged I can confirm that the real fault was a poor connection to the Rail fuel pressure sensor…lightly poking the cable resulted in the engine stopping with absolutely NO faults logged. I can’t remember when I was so happy to stand in the freezing rain surrounded by bits of car.:yay:

Many thanks to a mechanic at the Leicester Peugeot dealer Robins and Day who told me about this not-logged quirk and saved me from having to dump an unreliable motor that no-one could fix.:clap:

No thanks to the b*****d Peugeot dealer in Gijón, "Autocasa" who wanted to sell me a new injector pump two weeks before they were about to get shut down by Peugeot Spain.:noway::censored:

I think I would have found this fault myself if the bloody engine was in the right way round and it was actually possible to get at/check all the sensors without dismantling half the car in the process.
What an awful engine to work on.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
No it wasn't dead. It had died on the way back from the diesel specialist, so I got it towed home. It started next day and continued to run ok so I spent my spare time over a few weeks fiddling and fettling about fixing the FAP system (unrelated issue I know) and trying to get it to die pulling cables about.
I just happened to be in the UK on business so was able to visit the dealers where I got the crucial pointer to check the sensor connector.

I always thought it was a sensor issue but I still can't believe the ECU doesn't record it.
 
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