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I have a 2006 Peugeot 307 with an HDi 16 engine.

I recently took it in to a dealer for some repairs that my usual mechanic couldn’t do. During their diagnostic process they detected a glow plug fault code, which they suggested was the cause of the car starting rough in the cold. It still starts, just chugs along smokily for 30 seconds to a minute until it comes good and then is fine for the rest of the day.

I gave them the go-ahead to change the glow-plugs, something they quote $850 for, but when I picked it up they said they were unable to change them since they could not get them loose, and did not want to snap them off.

I talked to the foreman at length about it and his conclusion was that I should consider selling the vehicle now, or call around to find someone experienced with this repair, but warned me that snapping the glow plugs would cause the cost of repair to rise above the value of the car, due to the cost of removing the cylinder head.

Some googling confirms that this all checks out, since the glow plugs are so hard to access and they can be hard to loosen when they’ve been in so long.

I have two questions.

1. How big of an issue are the glow plugs failing?

My independent research suggests a variety of answers from “It’s Australia, you don’t need ‘em.” to “Get this fixed now, before it causes more expensive problems.” What will happen when all glow plugs have failed completely?

2. Does anyone know anyone in Sydney who has done this kind of repair before or who would be worth talking to about it?

It seems crazy to throw away an otherwise very neat and comfortable family car because of a couple of $30 glow plugs.
 

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Glowplugs DO NOT affect starting they do help in the warm up process hence the chugging when cold but their main use on modern diesels is to get engine temp up higher during the regen process of the DPF.

If its not starting good something else is the real cause.

IF your car has a DPF then they are needed it it has no DPF they can be ignored.

Many code readers read a glowplug fault even when there is no fault though well documented ghost fault on these.

So summary

DPF you need glowplugs
No DPF you dont need glowplugs
 

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If all 4 glow plugs fail it can cause a anti-pollution fault and subsequently a limp mode scenario. This happened on my 1.4Hdi and like it is they are difficult to access in situ. Taking the engine out is a option but what I did was fool the system by slaving in a 1ohm resistor in place of the plugs and bingo no problem with limp mode. As said they are not really needed for starting as shall we say "normal" diesels unless the outside temp gets down to arctic like temps! As your engine is starting OK but runs rough then as relaible406 points out there is something else causing that. Sticking injector maybe!
There are a few tricks to getting them out like attempting it when the engine is still hot and gentle percussion with a hammer plus easing oil etc but they are not always successful.
 

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Mines smoky in the morning then clears just a wearing injector check if you have dpf as you need glow plugs if you don’t just forget them completely


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I have a 2006 Peugeot 307 with an HDi 16 engine.

I recently took it in to a dealer for some repairs that my usual mechanic couldn’t do. During their diagnostic process they detected a glow plug fault code, which they suggested was the cause of the car starting rough in the cold. It still starts, just chugs along smokily for 30 seconds to a minute until it comes good and then is fine for the rest of the day.

I gave them the go-ahead to change the glow-plugs, something they quote $850 for, but when I picked it up they said they were unable to change them since they could not get them loose, and did not want to snap them off.

I talked to the foreman at length about it and his conclusion was that I should consider selling the vehicle now, or call around to find someone experienced with this repair, but warned me that snapping the glow plugs would cause the cost of repair to rise above the value of the car, due to the cost of removing the cylinder head.

Some googling confirms that this all checks out, since the glow plugs are so hard to access and they can be hard to loosen when they’ve been in so long.

I have two questions.

1. How big of an issue are the glow plugs failing?

My independent research suggests a variety of answers from “It’s Australia, you don’t need ‘em.” to “Get this fixed now, before it causes more expensive problems.” What will happen when all glow plugs have failed completely?

2. Does anyone know anyone in Sydney who has done this kind of repair before or who would be worth talking to about it?

It seems crazy to throw away an otherwise very neat and comfortable family car because of a couple of $30 glow plugs.

Go ahead and change yourself,with sunday morning easy job.
You need to hold tight and unscrew,hold tight and unscrew,giving wd40 to plug to not broke inside of motor.
 
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