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Discussion Starter #1
Due to a failed sensor I had to replace the hub bearing. I got a replacement hub second hand and fitted that and it works so now I have started replacing the bearing in the old hub. I had bought the bearing already before deciding to get a second one so I thought I would give it a go. Now these older cars have seen some miles so expectations of a easy job was not expected. Corrosion and muck etc are evident and even getting the circlip out of the inner side of the hub was a task. I had ordered a new one as it was impossible to get it out in good condition. The manual tells you to replace it anyway. Now the bearing comes out by pushing it from the front but you cannot get onto the full face of the bearing as the hub design means the front is narrower than the bearing acting as a stop. So pushing out intact with a press is not an option. Using the biggest size drift I pushed what I could out which was the inner bearing ring and cage with balls. That left the outer ring in place which has a curved portion for the bearings to run in. It is possible to get a drift to push against that but because of the shape of the hub it is nigh on impossible to keep the assy square and the drift square on the outer ring. 4 tons force was the max I could get before the drift cocked out of line. So I decided that the only way was to use the Dremel and cut the outer ring to relieve the pressure . Awkward job because of the front of the hub where the ring abuts the casting. Eventually managed with both cutting and using a rotary file bit in a drill. Once the cut is made the press pushed it out easy.
 

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I've never had a problem pressing out 307 hub bearings.:confused:
I knock out the inner race and put it in the outer, then it presses out with varying degrees of ease. :rolleyes:
The hardest part I always found was the race left on the flange, I have found for really stubborn ones putting some weld on the race will distort it and expedite removal.

Roger.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I am a bit confused here. You have the outer race in the hub. Then joining the inner and outer races are the balls in a plastic cage. Once you push the inner race out with the balls and plastic cage where does the inner race contact the outer race to be able to use it to press the outer out? And what is the race on the flange? The outer race comes out complete. You cannot get to the outer part of the race as I described due to the flange of the hub which acts as a stop when the new bearing is pushed in!
 

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You need a complete race and inner bearing on the outer side to be able to press out rhe outer. I'm assuming the inner part of the bearing stayed on the flange when you knocked it out?. If so use the inner from the other side.

Roger.
 

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As above you use half the original bearing that came out the back in the front edge push against that and pop out it all comes

Getting the bit left on the driveflange is always the hardest part i grind the edge away enough to weaken it and split it with a chisel it then comes off easy
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
rustyroger No the inner flange came out with the cage and the bearings using the press.
reliable 406 As you can see from the photo that is the complete outer half of the bearing that was left when I pushed the inner race and cage out. I was hoping the whole bearing would come out in one but it did not. As I said because of the end lip it is impossible to press on the outer shell so the centre lip is the only place to press against. This is curved and so it is nigh on impossible to keep a drift on it square at 4 tons pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Having dug the inner race out of the scrap bin I now see what you are getting at. The large diameter bit that was on the inner part of the bearing when fitted has what looks like a thin flange to it that indeed buts up against the roller cam in the outer flange. But it is that thin I would have thought it would have folded under 4+tons of pressure exerted by the press. But I bow to your experience and thank you for your input. I only hope this thread helps someone who has to tackle the job. All I have to do is press in the new. I am busy tidying up the stub axle ready for painting but will press it in first after the epoxy primer is sprayed on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have fitted the new bearing in the hub with reasonable ease and fitted the circlip. I then went to fit the hub and realised that it had come out of the old bearing wearing the outer part of the inner bearing runner. I did not realise that the inner flange was split like it is. So that explains why I had the trouble I had! So now the task is to remove that! The joy of Peugeots eh!
 

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Several ways of shifting the remaining piece of bearing:
You may be able to punch a sharp chisel between the flange and bearing. You need a good firmly mounted vice for this. Normally once the bearing has moved a bit it gets progressively easier.
Carefully grind a flat into the bearing. when you have ground down almost to the flange it should spit with a sharp blow and slide off.
Weld onto the bearing (use a high current) this should distort the bearing and make it easier to shift.

Hope this helps.

Roger.
 
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