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Discussion Starter #1
in the process of installing a oil catch can on my 2.0HDI , the breather from the cover goes to the oil filler tube. on some other diesels i`ve seen it connect up to the inlet of the turbo, should i connect it up this way and block the oil filler tube connection ?
 

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After cleaning the crap out of the intake of my 406 2.0 HDi which is created by the combination of soot from the EGR and the oil mist from the crankcase ventilation system combining to form a horrible, sludgy mess (see image) I'm about to do the same thing.

I'm not familiar with the 2.0 diesel in the 307 but where you want to fit it is before the point where the crankcase ventilation enters the intake system. This will likely be somewhere after the MAF and air doser but before the turbo.

If you have access to Service Box you will be able to see the plumbing.

I have attached an image of where I would intersect the plumbing to install the catch can on my engine. There's not much room and I will have to use some right-angle connectors to attach the catch-can input and output pipes.

The old 2.1 turbo diesels had an oil catcher (not a very effective one) factory installed. I don't know why this was left off the 2.0 HDi
 

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Discussion Starter #4
oil catch cans

Why are you fitting a catch can?. They belong on engine with open breathers, illegal on modern cars.

Roger.
im fitting it cause i want to.
and THEY ARE NOT ILLEGAL,...

so you havent done ANY illlegal mods to your car ?

mk
 

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Hi...you can do what you like to your car but you are altering the emmisions system..but I think most of your oil issues come from the turbo oil 'mist' building up in the manifold and excessive soot from the egr mixing with oil mist caused by a badly running engine..if the engine is 'breathing' heavily then the engine is past its best....(ps..caps is regarded as shouting and is frowned on in this forum.)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
oil catch can

Hi...you can do what you like to your car but you are altering the emmisions system..but I think most of your oil issues come from the turbo oil 'mist' building up in the manifold and excessive soot from the egr mixing with oil mist caused by a badly running engine..if the engine is 'breathing' heavily then the engine is past its best....(ps..caps is regarded as shouting and is frowned on in this forum.)

not altering emissions and it is legal : https://www.sa.gov.au/topics/driving-and-transport/vehicles/vehicle-standards-and-modifications/aftermarket-components
 

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Oil vapour catch-cans are standard equipment on most diesel truck engines because the higher crankcase pressures in diesel engines creates greater oil vapour in the ventilation system. Why they are not standard equipment on light diesel engines, particularly those fitted with EGR systems (poorly designed) is beyond me.

They also catch the small amount of water condensation in the crankcase so don't pour the contents of the catch-can back into the engine!

Some cautions though:
- do not allow the system to become clogged. If the crankcase pressure can't be released there will be consequences. You also don't want a diesel to start sucking oil into the intake it could create a diesel-runaway situation.
- the output of the catch-can is after the air filter and in front of the turbo, make sure nothing comes loose and gets pulled it - turbos don't like foreign objects in them.

I haven't done mine yet but I intend to and I've done a fair bit of research. I've come to the conclusion that a home-made or cheap one could be worse than none at all.
 

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Oil catch can's aren't illegal provided it doesn't vent to atmosphere, it simply removes the majority of the oil before routing the air back into the intake system.

Yes, oil catch cans are a good idea IF and only IF it is adequately sized. Diesels have higher crankcase pressures so need larger oil catch cans that can handle the flow, if you fit one that is incorrectly engineered, it will do far more, serious damage (i.e, blown engine).

Oil catch cans were removed from passenger vehicles because it's something else to service and if not checked mid-service (needed to be emptied possibly after all, engines can burn up to 1l of oil in 1000 miles) it would be a far worse problem for warranty claims.
 
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