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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have read many electrical faults on this forum and have to ask what is the point of have all these fance electric in a car.
The poor owner get's stung rotten for an ECU change.

What are Peugeot and other makes up to. It appears to be a way to line their own pockets wit our money.

Whaqt does a customer want, well this one wants a car that is reliable and from what i have read there are quite a few that are not.

lets have a car that needs the points adjusting, the carb tuned up.

I know it wont happen but what the hell
 

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advanced techknowledge mate people want it and the government enforce it so you have to go with the flow or buy a classic:thumb: .
 

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LOL, bring back the horse and cart.

Not to sound rude or anything. But we have to move forward, older cars still had problems. I think you're making it sound like all pug's have electrical faults. All the faults I've witnessed have not been electrical so far? They appear electrical like the indicator problem, however they are a mechanical physical defect of the stalk for example
 
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I'm on my 19th pug, and my 9th new or nearly new modern generation pug, and I've never suffered an electrical fault of any kind at all.

The reason we have ECUs is so our engines can give the power and economy the punter demands, with the emissions the law demands. Multiplexed electrics are a pain, but make it easier and cheaper to fit the masses of modern accessories and active safety equipment that you, the consumer, demand. It's all very well people moaning cars are fat and overweight, but people dying from steering columns through the chest is now almost unheard of, thanks to the ECU. ECUs themselves actually fail rarely, and can often be repaired by specialists at much less than the cost of a new one. Our man Swollocks hisself recently pioneers the art of BSI repair. in 3 years as a professional tech, and a decade and a half doing it on the side, I've only personally encountered a single irretrievably failed ECU, and that was on a Nissan Primera.

Earlier today I was remniscing with a friend about my 1st car, a 1750 Allegro, of 24 years ago and if you think life was better or any more reliable without the ECU then you either weren't there like I was, or you've forgotton. The first cold day of autumn and the nation rattled to the sound of cars having their starters ground down in a vain attempt to start in the morning. The first hint of rain on the motorway and every 2 or 3 miles you'd spot a car overwhelmed with damp, sodden owner looking miserable on the hard shoulder. That was a fact of life.

Cars will never be perfect, and to expect a machine in excess or 10,000 components to perform faultlessly for ever in extremes of temperature, humidity and vibration is simply unreasonable. Nevertheless, modern electronics make it closer than ever before.

If you want a car with points that you can adjust, then you need your bumps feeling. I've had many a Cortina burn out a set of points, and a V8 Rover snap a set right at the main car entrance to Luton airport (I was popular!), so you're substituting one unlikely ECU problem, with one all most inevitable points one. And how do you expect to achieve modern fuel consumption, performance, emissions and cold starting with a bit of metal held open by a spring? It just isn't going to happen.

fixing a modern car is no harder. It's just a different skill set. I rarely need my timing light of vacuum gauge (though I still know how to use both), but a multimeter isn't very difficult to master and your most versatile modern tool, the internet, gives you the voltage, resistance and capacitance values of just about any electronic sender or computer you're likely to encounter.

Aside from that, an oil change is the same, a caliper hasn't changed much, and a shock absorber is much as they always were.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
chopper1192 said:
I'm on my 19th pug, and my 9th new or nearly new modern generation pug, and I've never suffered an electrical fault of any kind at all.

The reason we have ECUs is so our engines can give the power and economy the punter demands, with the emissions the law demands. Multiplexed electrics are a pain, but make it easier and cheaper to fit the masses of modern accessories and active safety equipment that you, the consumer, demand. It's all very well people moaning cars are fat and overweight, but people dying from steering columns through the chest is now almost unheard of, thanks to the ECU. ECUs themselves actually fail rarely, and can often be repaired by specialists at much less than the cost of a new one. Our man Swollocks hisself recently pioneers the art of BSI repair. in 3 years as a professional tech, and a decade and a half doing it on the side, I've only personally encountered a single irretrievably failed ECU, and that was on a Nissan Primera.

Earlier today I was remniscing with a friend about my 1st car, a 1750 Allegro, of 24 years ago and if you think life was better or any more reliable without the ECU then you either weren't there like I was, or you've forgotton. The first cold day of autumn and the nation rattled to the sound of cars having their starters ground down in a vain attempt to start in the morning. The first hint of rain on the motorway and every 2 or 3 miles you'd spot a car overwhelmed with damp, sodden owner looking miserable on the hard shoulder. That was a fact of life.

Cars will never be perfect, and to expect a machine in excess or 10,000 components to perform faultlessly for ever in extremes of temperature, humidity and vibration is simply unreasonable. Nevertheless, modern electronics make it closer than ever before.

If you want a car with points that you can adjust, then you need your bumps feeling. I've had many a Cortina burn out a set of points, and a V8 Rover snap a set right at the main car entrance to Luton airport (I was popular!), so you're substituting one unlikely ECU problem, with one all most inevitable points one. And how do you expect to achieve modern fuel consumption, performance, emissions and cold starting with a bit of metal held open by a spring? It just isn't going to happen.

fixing a modern car is no harder. It's just a different skill set. I rarely need my timing light of vacuum gauge (though I still know how to use both), but a multimeter isn't very difficult to master and your most versatile modern tool, the internet, gives you the voltage, resistance and capacitance values of just about any electronic sender or computer you're likely to encounter.

Aside from that, an oil change is the same, a caliper hasn't changed much, and a shock absorber is much as they always were.

The Allegro AKA All Agro, what a piece of shite they were. I knew someone that had a brand new one, the engine quite literally fell out of it one week after taking delivery.

All that said ,your right of course, by an large cars are far more reliable than they ever were.

The name Chopper, anything to do with bike by chance
 
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bettyswollocks said:
For some reason i have that film in my dvd collection somewhere,strange guy that chopper/s
I always thought Chopper Read was a misunderstood soul. You've seen my picture Swollocks - I look more like Michael Peterson, but bigger.
 
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