Peugeot Forums banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,
I bought a little 307 for my daughter and had some trouble with it overheating. My friend helped with all the head gasket, cooling system and other things that need to be checked and fixed.
My friend had simply pulled things apart and stated that the timing should be easy to do as there is usually marks to show how it is done.
On checking how the timing works, there appears to be multiple suggestions, and they seem to be based on pinning the flywheel and/or cams before removing belts etc.
There were marks on the cogs and housing that appeared to be painted marks, most likely from the previous work done by a mechanic.
Following these and checking TDC on plug one seemed to get it timed with a full rotation of the engine by hand working.
However, when doing some quick engine turns via ignition (after rebuilding), it seems a valve is just touching a piston, so may be out by one or two teeth on one of the cams, possibly inlet.

Is there any place that describes how to do a factory timing of the 307 at all?

Regards
Jon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Sorry guys, the engine is a 2.0 litre twin overhead cam type. Working it out from the VIN, the VDS is 3CRFNE, so I take it that it is an RFN type.
The year from the vin is 2008, although it was sold to me as a 2007 model for some reason. Is there any further details that are needed?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,123 Posts
These are NOT timed at top dead centre you must use the timing tools there is 1 goes into flywheel at REAR of block and 1 in each cam the pistons end up half way down the bore but not quite level when timed correctly if you know the engine you can time it using the woodruff key as reference but if you dont know the engine this is not an option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,048 Posts
According to the Haynes manual there were two series of this engine. Pre RPO 9653 and post RPO9653. The difference being that on the early ones the crankshaft pin goes through the front sprocket and the later ones through the flywheel cylinder block. The camshaft holes are the same. God knows when the change was implemented age wise though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,123 Posts
No NEVER use the front hole as it can move thats why they stopped saying to use it well known issue the pulley is made in 2 parts and the 2 parts move !!

Even on the early cars the crank pin hole is present ALWAYS use the crank pin on these.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
> These are NOT timed at top dead centre you must use the timing tools there is 1 goes into flywheel at REAR of block and 1 in each cam the pistons end up half way down the bore but not
> quite level when timed correctly if you know the engine you can time it using the woodruff key as reference but if you dont know the engine this is not an option.
Okay, 1 in each cam was simple, and does appear to match up with the paint marks someone left on the cams/engine.
We found access to the flywheel through a hole in the block, but it is at the front of the motor between the battery and the head, although on turning, it was not obvious if there was a locking whole anywhere. Is this a second one that is used for something else? It would seem if the lock is at the rear of the block, we have to jack up the other side of the car from where the cams/crank are and taking of the wheel guards, maybe even gearbox to get to it, or is it much simpler than that? Is there a diagram somewhere that indicates exactly where that locking tool is for the flywheel?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,123 Posts
Search for rfn timing there are threads showing the timing tools and holes on this forum there were 2 similar threads and im sure i posted pics on both of them both were regarding 307 cc but engines are all the same
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
The saga continues.....

So the first thing I would like to confirm is that there is actually two locations that this flywheel lock can be, correct? Looking through forum posts, I see (one example) Reliable406 posted in 2018:

"Like i said it goes in the FLYWHEEL in a hole above the driveshaft rear of engine so you NEED to get under to see it."

However, I don't understand how there is a main driveshaft on an E/W engine and have checked in obvious places underneath and could not find anything. The other posts indicate this:

"i have taken the starter out and pinned the flywheel to be extra sure"

This seems to match closer to what we found, however, there did not appear to be a specific way to lock it, just access it. Can anyone elaborate on this method of locking the flywheel please?

So in our last attempt to time it, using traditional TDC method, tested with full manual turns etc and when testing the turnover in the car, there was a slight ticking sound so figured we were out by one or two teeth. So this time, tried it again with the knowledge that TDC was not necessarily correct, had the cams sprockets locked, and did manual rotation until it appeared correct (30mm down). This matched a second paint market on the lower sprocket, so it seemed to be good. Manual rotation went through smoothly without any issue.

On testing the turn over via ignition, the car did not have the ticking sound, however, there was compression via the air intake. You could hear the "huffing" so it appears the compression is out in the timing.

Is it possible to have it timed to the wrong turn/revolution of the engine? That is, can you time it based in compression stage versus timing based on exhaust stage? If there is a compression issue in the timing, is there an easy way to fix it without necessarily having to remove the whole timing setup and start from scratch?

Much appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,123 Posts
You MUST use the timing tools in the hole in REAR of block it is NOT timed at TDC if you time it at TDC you will bend valves it's really that simple

The timing hole behind starter applies to diesel engines

The crank pulley timing hole moves and should never be used.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,048 Posts
In a search a post from reliable406 describes the hole as being in the block at the bulkhead side and is above the LH wheel drive shaft. It is a 20mm hole. As he suggested use the search facility "rfn timing" and it is top of the list.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top