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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Guys,

I brought some LED lights to replace my normal bulb lights on the headlights, turn side lights and the plate lights, but when I turn off the lights and turn on for example the side lights or use the brake, I see some current going into the headlights and the dashboard, I feel like the current is returning since LED light is way too low voltage and amp in needs, do any of you Guys have encountered this same issue?

At first, I didn't take this seriously, but now sometimes when I'm driving, I see the side turn signals going faster than the normal tic toc, which is completely weird and finally, I start seeing the lights went black for a couple of seconds as well now, which makes me worry a little bit.

I ordered a new indicator signal switch from Ebay, but not quite sure if this is the problem here. (is cheap $10)

Regards,
Jerimy
 

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HI..you need to fit 'error' free led's...your cars electrical system doesnt like standard leds....
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hello there,

Well, I was wondering if someone had the same experience, I'm thinking that maybe I could use like resistors in the circuit to prevent the current going back to the circuits, but not quite sure.
 

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Resistors dont stop current flowing diodes are what you mean the resistor is to load the circuit to make up for the lower current of LEDs

Problem with fitting LEDs in peugeots is the BSI is expecting a certain current to be drawn by each circuit and if it draws less it thinks bulbs are blown etc and can do strange things it could also be poor earths are being exagerated by the low current draw of the bulbs.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, I asked this in a electrical forum and this is the answer that I got:

Expert Reply:
Yes, you will need a load resistor for each LED bulb you install on a turn signal circuit.

Basically the same problem that I'm facing

 

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Discussion Starter #6
Load resistors are electrical components that provide electrical resistance within a circuit, thus providing "load" on the circuit. With LED lights, their low power draw on the circuit causes issues such as error messages appearing stating that the bulb is not functioning on certain cars or cause issues such as hyper-flashing (rapid blinking) of the turn signals. Load resistors create a load on the circuit which tricks the vehicle into thinking that the LED bulb is drawing the same amount of power as the factory incandescent one which gets rid of the error messages and hyper-flashing issues. The electrical circuit can be thought of as a fast moving highway and the load resistor as an accident on the freeway that causes traffic to slow down considerably; while the traffic flow is still steady, it has slowed down than any other part of the freeway at location of the accident.
 

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Yes that is correct but your post was stating you wanted to PREVENT the current going back not increase the load !!

You need to get the terminology right if you want the right answers :)
 

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Yes, I agree with you, but I suppose that increasing the load to the circuit will make that the current will not return I guess, even tho, I'm not quite sure what is going on exactly, so I started with this and I'll share my experience here.
 

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I think you have more than 1 issue too little load AND poor earthing

In some cars you can fit an electronic flasher unit with no need to fit load resistors but peugeots dont have a servicable flasher unit its inside the BSI
 

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Yes, I agree with you, but I suppose that increasing the load to the circuit will make that the current will not return I guess, even tho, I'm not quite sure what is going on exactly, so I started with this and I'll share my experience here.
I get the impression you don’t understand basic electrical circuits so let me try to explain. When a light switch is turned you create an electrical circuit which applies 12 volts to the light bulb. The electric circuit sees the light bulb as a resistor. A basic electrical engineering equation is: Power= Voltage x Current. As an example if you have a 25W bulb running at 12 Volts is will draw a current of 25/12= 2.08 Amp. Using Ohm’s law (Voltage= Current x Resistance) the Resistance of the bulb =12/2.08=5.75 Ohms.

Standard light bulbs are very inefficient so most of the power is lost as heat but LEDs are very efficient so almost all the power is converted to light so LEDs draws a lot less current for the same level of light.

As Reliable406 explained the car’s BMI is expecting the light bulb to draw a fairly high current whereas the LED will only draw a fraction of that current.

You can connect a resistor in parallel with your LED light bulb to draw sufficient current to make the BMI believe a normal light bulb is connected but you will need a resistor with a high power rating. The sort of resistors used in electronics will not be suitable. The resistor will be very hot to touch - it could be a fire risk if not put in a suitable location.

If you can tell me what the power ratings are of your existing bulb and the new LED bulb I can tell you the size of resistor you need.

Note. The same issue exist with LED replacements for household halogen down-lights. The old iron core transformers work fine but the modern switch mode transformers don’t work with LEDs unless specially designed for them.
 
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