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Discussion Starter #1
Morning all, or evening if you are across the world!

Would a dodgy battery in my 03, 307 1.4LX HDi cause the rear light bulbs to blow all the time? I'm replacing them roughly every 2 weeks. I just took another out last night after it blew and noticed it's smokey inside the bulb, and the base of the bulb seems a bit dented/melted. It's never the brake lights, just the rear sidelights.

On another note, I had the anti pollution fault before Christmas and had the car in to an independent for a diagnostics check. The bloke told me it showed up low pressure on the injectors, so suggested a fuel filter change and to stick some petrol in to stop the diesel from waxing in the severe cold we had. I changed the filter, and stuck some injection cleaner into it, ignored the petrol advice.

Since then, the engine management light has remained off, but the fuel consumption is through the roof. I used to get about 630 miles to a full tank, now I'm getting about 500. Any ideas?

Cheers in advance for reading this and possible helping :D
 

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if the battery is pushing out more voltage and amps then it can cause issues....but i'd start looking for shorts, cut wires, corroded connections and if the bulb holders have had it. plus i would check to see if the fuse is the correct grade and belongs there, e.g if a 20 is in a 10...etc.

cant help about the the mpg, unfortuneatly
 
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cck2k9 said:
if the battery is pushing out more voltage and amps then it can cause issues....but i'd start looking for shorts, cut wires, corroded connections and if the bulb holders have had it. plus i would check to see if the fuse is the correct grade and belongs there, e.g if a 20 is in a 10...etc.

cant help about the the mpg, unfortuneatly
The alternator will be the one pushing out the high voltage!
There could be any fuse above say 10A in the lamp circuit circuit and wouldnt cause a bulb blowing problem. Only if there was a dead short then you would have melted wiring.

Back to the post. If I was you I would be looking at the quality of the bulbs you're putting in first. What brand are they?
 

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davidireland said:
There could be any fuse above say 10A in the lamp circuit circuit and wouldnt cause a bulb blowing problem.
i wouldnt say that is entirely true, if you push a larger rated fuse into a circuit, it can allow more current to get through on a surge (engine startup), reduce the life and kill the device on the end. a sole purpose of a fuse is to protect the device on the end, in this case a light bulb.

this doubled with a dodgy alternator and more current going through the circuit than it is designed for will melt a wire or two. in the end becoming a fire hazard.

thats why when you read anything relating to a fuse, they always say never put a higher rated fuse in any device. if it needs something higher than stated, you have major issues somewhere and needs to be investigated right away.

hope that makes sense, and didnt cause any offence by responding like this :thumb:

but i would say a short circuit does seem to be gremlin i would be looking for:thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've used various makes of bulbs from different suppliers. They still blow whenever they want!

I had read that a battery acts a bit like a surge protector from the alternator, as the current from the alternator is 'dirty'. So a bad battery would be providing little or no protection.

I've no idea if this theory is actually right of course. I got a new battery anyway as the old one was tested and apparently poor. Is there an easy way to check for a bad earth, and would that alone cause both bulbs to blow at different times?

Cheers for the replies so far.
 
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Why not get somebody to start your car while you take a reading from the bulb holder? Then hold it there for a bit, record your findings at every 30 second interval or something, then you'll find if it's staying the same or varying. Do this while the other person puts high revs (like simulating motorway travel etc).

Maybe it is the alternator kicking out extra power or something. Maybe its a short.

is there damp getting anywhere? or has access anywhere within the vehicle?
 
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cck2k9 said:
i wouldnt say that is entirely true, if you push a larger rated fuse into a circuit, it can allow more current to get through on a surge (engine startup), reduce the life and kill the device on the end. a sole purpose of a fuse is to protect the device on the end, in this case a light bulb.

this doubled with a dodgy alternator and more current going through the circuit than it is designed for will melt a wire or two. in the end becoming a fire hazard.

thats why when you read anything relating to a fuse, they always say never put a higher rated fuse in any device. if it needs something higher than stated, you have major issues somewhere and needs to be investigated right away.

hope that makes sense, and didnt cause any offence by responding like this :thumb:

but i would say a short circuit does seem to be gremlin i would be looking for:thumb:
No offence but im speaking hypothetically. In an ideal world where the correct current flowing and no problems with earths etc having a fuse of any size above the current flowing in the bulb circuit will not make a fuse blow.
A fuse will only blow as you say with a dead short.
 

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Wasnt this a fault on some of the hdis i remember reading a bulletin the alternator pushes out more voltage on occasions their remedy is to replace the alt

Its not the amps that blows a bulb its the volts if it was the amperage then as soon as you connect a bulb to a car battery it would blow like leds would, Now saying that if say 16v went to the bulb due to ohms law then the amperage would change as there all balanced
 
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