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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my brake line broke right at the caliper and I thinking of just buying a flaring kit to repair it instead of buying a new line (also an excuse to buy a new tool). I was just looking at kits there on Ebay and there seems to be imperial and metric flaring kits.
I would have thought they'd be metric, being European and all, but the Peugeot brake pipes on Ebay are all measured in imperial, so I don't know.

Anyone know? Does it make a difference? The brake line seems to be 5mm on the outside anyway.. Not sure if that's a standard size or if there's a similar imperial measurement..
 

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Problem is the pipes only seem to come in imperial sizes the nuts for the ends are metric though :)

Just buy standard size brake pipe and metric end fittings and you will be fine flaring tool will have a fitment to suit
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Nice one.
I ended up just buying the whole section of brake line instead, since it was the bit that goes into the caliper and it has a bend on it. I'd have had to straighten the line to the nut on abover the tool when flaring it, and I wouldn't fancy bending it since it looks a bit dodgy anyway. Also, since it broke once I don't really trust it..

I'll probably get a flaring kit at some stage anyway since brake lines love to rust and the NCT in Ireland are always looking for any bit of rust on them.

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Why not give them a coat of black anti-rust, e.g. Waxoyl?
I'll probably do that anyway for the metal other parts of the brake line, but the piece in question is the flexible section (with the flared end) that goes into the caliper. Better to just replace it since it broke once already. Repairing it it would involve straightening, filing, flaring and then bending it again.

I'm all for doing DIY hacks but I wouldn't fancy messing around with, and bending an already rusty/broken brake pipe. If it was a straight section, and I could get the nut far enough up onto the line before flaring, I'd probably have taken a chance alright..
 

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It looks to me that the broken pipe is a composite of metal pipe and flexible pipe. If so replacing the whole thing is the only practical repair. They are made that way in factories with dedicated high pressure tools and cannot be dismantled. You might liken it to replacing a filament in a blown light bulb.

Roger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It looks to me that the broken pipe is a composite of metal pipe and flexible pipe. If so replacing the whole thing is the only practical repair. They are made that way in factories with dedicated high pressure tools and cannot be dismantled. You might liken it to replacing a filament in a blown light bulb.

Roger.
Indeed. I'd reached the same conclusion (finally!). It just arrived in the post so I'm going to go out and throw it on there now.
 

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99.9 % of cars (inc most PSA) use 3/16 OD brake pipe with only the unions being Imperial or Metric (PSA are normally 10mm fine thread).

Clarke do a good DIY flaring tool which works with Cuprnickle pipe and can be used in situ which is what i used to do rear lines on my old 307SW as the lines were one piece from ABS pump right through to the rear axle and a pain to swap complete
 
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