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Discussion Starter #1
So my brakes were sticking, back ones more so than the front ones, so I started on the rear left and took it apart to clean it.
I've done brakes before so I'm not totally new to it, but I did let the fluid run out of the reservoir after I removed the piston. Thought I had half a bottle left, but realised I didn't when I was half way through the job.

It looked like whoever done the brakes before didn't put the rubber boot on properly and it was letting crap down into the piston/caliper. When I took the piston out, a load of dirty black brake fluid came out.

Anyway, I cleaned it out and put everything back together and bled them, and thought it was ok until I started the car and the brakes just went slack. I re-bled them and had fine pressure when the car was turned off, but when I start the engine they go slack again.

So I bled all four wheels according to servicebox (a right pain with only a crappy jack) and then bled the system with PP2000, twice, and it seems to have helped. The brake pedal still seem a bit slack in the first 1/3 of it's travel, but they stop the car just fine.

Basically I'm wondering what to do next, taking off the master cylinder is obviously a last resort.

Do I keep bleeding, then give it a break and repeat until the air makes it's way to the nipples?

Do I keep running PP2000? Is it bad to keep repeating PP2000 to bleed the brakes? (it scared me the first time I did it, lol)

Or just drive on with a slightly slack brake pedal? I can't remember how slack the pedal was before I started, it's not something I gave much thought to..
 

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Well my impression is that the 407 has a fairly slack pedal to begin with. I once went through lots of trouble trying to find the cause of a bit long travel and sloppy feel in my 407's brakes.

In the end I even changed the servo, but really it seem just that the pedal do have a little bit low biting point compared to newer cars, i.e. 308 (first version) and 5008 that I also have access to both of them have a more firm pedal with less travel.

Drove the 407 yesterday first time for a long time, and surely it felt like I had to push the pedal through the floor compared to the 5008 (2011) that I drive as a daily these days.

If you're sure you got out all the air and there is no leaks etc. I would say it's likely your brakes are just as they should.
 

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to stop the reservoir emptying in future when fiddling with the brakes wedge a length of wood between the drivers seat and the pedal and depress the pedal slightly -this'll close off the passage of fluid and stop it draining till you've finished- you might need to stop rear brake lamps staying on if they do come on without ignition- i cant remember if they do or don't lol - either pull the bulbs or disconnect battery ,whichever' s easier for you
i hope this helps
neil
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Nice one for the replies.
I'll keep in mind that the pedal is slack by nature, and I think I'll double check everything again to be sure. I still have to free up the other three brakes anyway so I'll probably do a bit of bleeding in between.

The stick on the pedal is an interesting one, I'll definitely do that, or/and clamp the line too next time. I've already got a pedal-log I use for my one man bleeding setup. It goes: pedal>log>phonebook>seat. Phonebook protects the seat, it helps slide the log in, and gives it a little extra 'spring'.

I don't have a flexi clamp but I'm usually good at coming up with workarounds, it's all part of the fun!

The first time doing different brakes is usually the messiest anyway, I know what I'm in for with the other rear caliper. The screw-in piston had me going for a while, I never came across them before! :)
 

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I really struggle bleeding the brakes on our 807, don't think I have managed to get all the air out yet, think the problem is the inverted U on the pipes between master cylinder and ABS unit, next I'm going to try Easibleed pressure feed and son pumping pedal at the same time.
 

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Hi...I use the gunsons ezibleed and have never had a problem...I dont like the pedal pump method because i feel you are pushing the master cyl seals passed the pollised area they usually travel in...I recall old astras used to suffer inverted seals so use the pressure bleeder and bleed the furthest point first..works for me on my 307/407/3008...good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Ah, that eezibleed idea is genius!
It'd be worth it just for the connection alone (must get one) instead of compressed air in an emergency..

Yea I hit the floor a few times, until I read that it was a bad idea. When using PP2000 I only went about 3/4 ways down.

There's something really satisfying about using PP2000 for bleeding. :)

I took the car out for a good 1/2 hour spin a while ago and all seems fine anyway..
 

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Tried the Ezibleed some years ago but followed the Peugeot instructions and started with the wheel closest to the MC and pedal has been a bit spongy since.
I'll try again starting with the rear wheels once I find where the fluid is leaking out and it's not the clutch circuit.
 

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just as an upgrade to a standard easibleed ..
do yourself a BIG favour and cut the air "in" hose, and then ad a cheap little air pressure regulator off ebay, then you can regulator the pressure in the easibleed and just unscrew the knob to dump the pressure when you're done .
so much more civilized than fighting with 35+psi trying to force all your fluid out of every orifice,just use what you need,with no need to reduce the pressure in the tyre to use it all
neil
Compressor Relief Regulating Valve AR2000 Pressure Gauge Air Control Regulator | eBay
 
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