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Discussion Starter #1
We have recently bought a 2002 307 estate. Today my other half was checking the engine bay and came across this part just floating around? It has a lead attached to it but isn't bolted anywhere? We have no idea what it is? Can anyone tell me what it is and where it should be?
Thanks in advance
 

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Hi, its a vacuum reservoir.

If the car has had an EGR blanked, this reservoir becomes redundant. If your cars brakes are fine, and the turbo works as it should, then I wouldn't worry about this being removed.

Please check where the other end of the lead goes, and let us know so we can advise further.
 

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Hi, its a vacuum reservoir.

If the car has had an EGR blanked, this reservoir becomes redundant. If your cars brakes are fine, and the turbo works as it should, then I wouldn't worry about this being removed.

Please check where the other end of the lead goes, and let us know so we can advise further.
Not quite. On a 90bhp, the vacuum is used only by the EGR. On a 110bhp, it's used by the turbo as well.
 
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True, the 90 has a mechanical wastegate - but I don't know what engine type is in the 307....

I don't think a 90 would have a reservoir, but the OP has a pipe going into it, which must come from somewhere...:confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you. The pipe/lead seems to go back to the turbo but I will check in the morning. It has had the EGR removed and is a 110 bhp.
 

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Check for leaks! Any small leak on the vacuum circuit will cause several headaches.

Buy yourself a cheap vacuum measure tool, and plug it in the circuit. You should have constant vacuum while idling, and little to no loss after the engine stops.
 
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Thats my concern too, the reservoir has 3 inlets of which 2 are open - so if the vacuum reservoir is still in 'the circuit' then leaks a-plenty...
 

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Ok, first of all, don't think about removing that. You need that reservoir, the pump itself does not have the flow to open the wastegate fast enough.

Second, you claim that the pipe goes to the turbo, but if nothing is going to the pump, then there's no vacuum at all. Try to have the car running and plug the other two holes with your fingers. After a few seconds, remove them. If you feel/ear a rush of air entering the reservoir, somehow it's connected to the pump (at least). If not, you got problems, severe ones.
 
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I disagree.

Both my 406s had 5 different solenoids, which were slimmed down to only 2 solenoids ( only 1 on my current 406 ) and both had the reservoir binned.

You only need 2 pipes from the vacuum pump - 1 for the servo, 1 for the turbo solenoid.

The vacuum pump puts out ( in? ) nearly 1bar of ooomph, so plenty enough to supply the servo, and turbo solenoids job is to reduce the vacuum to open the turbo wastegate.

I believe the reservoir is used if there are multiple solenoids, and the demand for vacuum is high i.e. everything at once - but not needed in your 307.

Please advise where the pipes go, draw a diagram if you need to, and we can double check all is where it should be.
 

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307 vac circuit is different to 406 circuit the reservoir is an improvement to make the vac stable when all solenoids are drawing vac.

Your 406 being a 2.2 is different to a 110 every version has different vac layouts but in the case of the OP the vac canister having only 1 pipe is unlikely to be doing anything :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hi, thanks for all your help. We don't appear to be having any problems with the engine we just want to know where we need to attach it back to as it is currently resting on top of the air box.
As it is brightening up my partner will go out and see where this runs to.
 
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