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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone had problems on their front calipers before that the piston seem to be totally jammed?

The last two days I've noticed this burned smell after driving the car, and surely front right brake disc is damn hot.

Took the caliper off today, and it seemed like the piston had jammed. I tried to push it back using a 70cm long plier, however it wouldn't move at all, so just had to put it back on again. Guess it's new caliper time, but this I've never come out for before.

Even tried to open the bleed nipple while pressing it in, in case there were some blockage of the fluid somewhere.

Lots of pad material left also, so piston is not pushed very far out.
 

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its quit common for caliper to seize solid that goes for ant car make

second hand are good enough if you looky in the scrap yards you might find a newish one :)
 

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I would be tempted to try freeing it. You say the pads have a lot of material, if they were changed recently it may be that the previously exposed bit of piston has rusted a bit and when pushed back into the caliper it has gone tight.

If you can get hold of a wind back tool, I would suggest putting this in as if to wind the piston back in, but then loosen it a bit and get someone to stamp on the brake pedal to push the piston out while you hold the wind back tool in place, then wind back in a bit, repeat etc.

Maybe gradually allow the piston to come out further as if the pads were worn down, but not so far that the piston falls out. I've found in the past that by allow the piston to come out and then wind back in a few times they will become free enough for normal operation.
 

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If money was no object then yeah stick new calipers on rather than spending time sorting the old one, but I wouldn't replace a perfectly good caliper just because it's maybe got a bit of surface rust making it stick.

If you really want to be sure strip the caliper, polish the piston and bore and if they look ok, new seal and stick it back together.

Im a great believer in not disturbing what doesn't need disturbing, i.e undoing brake lines and then having to bleed if it can be avoided. So would still try the winding in/out first if it were mine.

I would add that once back together and wheel on, but still jacked up, I would operate the brakes and check for binding and if brake is not releasing I wouldn't just leave it.
 

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Well said
But if you do the strip down route make sure there's no pitting on piston and that rubber dust seal and piston seals are in good condition.
Put back together with red silicon grease.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Can't really afford not to have the car operative (as my second car is non-operative due to some service due to MOT). Of course the main car decides to go bust when the backup one is in pieces.

I think I'll just get a new caliper so I know I'll not get stuck during the process.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Guess I could have done that, or at least repaired the old one.

But picked up a new one at the main dealer today. Impressed how easy and nice it was to have banjo connections on the end of the brake hose, no more problems when undoing old hoses :)

The change were done in a few minutes inc. bleeding.
 
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