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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I'm looking at buying a used 308SW 1.6 diesel. Our current car has broken many years before we had hoped. So we don't have a massive amount of money.

I was hoping for dinner advice regarding getting a 308 SW, 2016 reg, but with 80k miles. What sort of things should I be looking out for? When should I expect/have expected the cambelt and pump to be changed etc.

Some help would be take appreciated. I'm not so fused about fancy, but want something that is economical and isn't going to cost me kids to fix!! Hope that makes sense.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Are you doing the overall mileage yearly to justify running a modern diesel?

Needs to be around 20k + to make sense.
I do around 5k miles a year. This car seems super economical. Surely it'll still be cheaper than any other option? What are the other expenses which make it more expensive?
 

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5k miles a year isnt enough mileage to warrant running a modern diesel.

You need to look at a petrol power if you want a 308 ( or any other modern car )

You need to focus on overall ownership costs not just the potential mpg a diesel can do.

A modern diesel engine like this with DPF system is the reason why its unsuitable for your usage.

Yes the petrol engine will return less mpg BUT it wont suffer the wallet draining problems a modern diesel powered car will if subjected to the same low mileage use.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
5k miles a year isnt enough mileage to warrant running a modern diesel.

You need to look at a petrol power if you want a 308 ( or any other modern car )

You need to focus on overall ownership costs not just the potential mpg a diesel can do.

A modern diesel engine like this with DPF system is the reason why its unsuitable for your usage.

Yes the petrol engine will return less mpg BUT it wont suffer the wallet draining problems a modern diesel powered car will if subjected to the same low mileage use.
Hi, thank you for this advice. What are the additional costs that come with this car? I assume it's something like service costs are much higher? Does the DPF require more attention?
 

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DPF hate short journeys or stop / start usage around town as it will never get hot enough to carry out a sucessful regen to burn away the soot & it will then block up.

You then end up taking the car for a fast motorway run & crossing your fingers it successfully completes a regen.

If that doesnt work you can force a regen with diagnostic equipment at a garage.

The inconvenience of owning a modern diesel for such low mileage use isnt worth the hassle or costs it will bring when it goes wrong.

The Puretech petrol engines in the 308 can return nearly 50 mpg average & would be a much better long term ownership choice for your usage.
 

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Hi, I'm looking at buying a used 308SW 1.6 diesel. Our current car has broken many years before we had hoped. So we don't have a massive amount of money.

I was hoping for dinner advice regarding getting a 308 SW, 2016 reg, but with 80k miles. What sort of things should I be looking out for? When should I expect/have expected the cambelt and pump to be changed etc.

Some help would be take appreciated. I'm not so fused about fancy, but want something that is economical and isn't going to cost me kids to fix!! Hope that makes sense.

Hi I bought a 308sw GT Auto 180bhp 2016 it has all the gizmo's you would want in a car I do about 7000 miles a year have it serviced every year normaly when MOT is due I'm well pleased with car.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
DPF hate short journeys or stop / start usage around town as it will never get hot enough to carry out a sucessful regen to burn away the soot & it will then block up.

You then end up taking the car for a fast motorway run & crossing your fingers it successfully completes a regen.

If that doesnt work you can force a regen with diagnostic equipment at a garage.

The inconvenience of owning a modern diesel for such low mileage use isnt worth the hassle or costs it will bring when it goes wrong.

The Puretech petrol engines in the 308 can return nearly 50 mpg average & would be a much better long term ownership choice for your usage.
This is helpful. I guess my only slight issue is the petrol is significantly more expensive than the diesel to buy. There's like a £1,500 difference in buying price. Which pretty much pushes it out of our price range. Is it just this Diesel car or is all diesel cars I should avoid for the same issue?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
DPF hate short journeys or stop / start usage around town as it will never get hot enough to carry out a sucessful regen to burn away the soot & it will then block up.

You then end up taking the car for a fast motorway run & crossing your fingers it successfully completes a regen.

If that doesnt work you can force a regen with diagnostic equipment at a garage.

The inconvenience of owning a modern diesel for such low mileage use isnt worth the hassle or costs it will bring when it goes wrong.

The Puretech petrol engines in the 308 can return nearly 50 mpg average & would be a much better long term ownership choice for your usage.
Also, how often would you need to do a long trip to keep it happy? Also how fast would you need to get it? We go to see my parents every month which is about a 50 mile trip up the A1(m). Would that do it?
 

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Another vote for the petrol one here. I had a 1.4 and it was incredible on fuel, returning about the same as my old 307 diesel.
 

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Whilst agreeing that a petrol engine car is probably a better choice for low mileage use I think you are being unnecessarily negative about diesel engine cars.

To answer the question directly: yes, a 50 mile trip up the A1 would probably be sufficient to activate the regeneration naturally. It would only though if the FAP (filter) was sufficiently congested. If you really have done very few miles since the last 50 mile trip then nothing might happen.

With regards to extra expense, it seems to me that the three-cylinder petrol engine has a flaky reputation for lunching its timing belt. Now all affected cars might have had the timing belt changed by now but it is an item that needs keeping an eye on and (regular?) replacement is more involved, and therefore expensive, than changing a timing belt on a diesel engine.

If you're only doing 5,000 miles a year then you'll be doing an annual service rather a mileage service. Yes, the oil is expensive but the oil filter isn't particularly so. Air filter and cabin filter would have to be changed regardless of engine type and could probably be left for a couple of services or more. That leaves the diesel fuel filter to be changed and, again, that could be left in place for several services. There is just one more "extra" for the Blue series of engines, and that is the AdBlue additive. This can be easily topped up by the user, in fact I did our car over the weekend. The tank takes 17l and will undoubtedly last for more than 5,000 miles. In your position I would leave the AdBlue refill until you get the warning message on the dashboard that you only have 1700 miles left and at that point I would add 10l. It's not expensive to buy and even Aldi offer it occasionally.

How long the Eolys and FAP will last is determined by the type of driving undertaken. The Eolys level should be read (by Diagbox or a high-end code reader) at each service and will probably be good until some 70,000 - 90,000 miles has been travelled. The FAP itself should be good for 125,000 - 150,000 miles and possibly after your ownership.

Fuel economy is noticeably better than the petrol engine cars. We get an easy 60mpg and can raise it to mid or even high 60s with careful driving or long runs. This easily overcomes the higher price per litre.

There's one more thing that I feel needs mentioning. And that's the better driveability of a diesel engine. You can use low engine speeds that would choke a petrol engine. Our car will pull with ease from under 1000rpm and there's none of the revving thrashiness of a petrol engine. Admittedly our car has very high 5th and 6th gears but 65mph is probably only about 1200rpm.

I hope that balances out the views.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Another vote for the petrol one here. I had a 1.4 and it was incredible on fuel, returning about the same as my old 307 diesel.
This is really helpful. I think the only thing that we might be struggling with is the additional cost of getting petrol. It'll cost us an additional £1,500 to get petrol over diesel. Which I was wondering if I maintained the diesel well regular services and oil changes. If we could make it work. Problems with not having much money!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Whilst agreeing that a petrol engine car is probably a better choice for low mileage use I think you are being unnecessarily negative about diesel engine cars.

To answer the question directly: yes, a 50 mile trip up the A1 would probably be sufficient to activate the regeneration naturally. It would only though if the FAP (filter) was sufficiently congested. If you really have done very few miles since the last 50 mile trip then nothing might happen.

With regards to extra expense, it seems to me that the three-cylinder petrol engine has a flaky reputation for lunching its timing belt. Now all affected cars might have had the timing belt changed by now but it is an item that needs keeping an eye on and (regular?) replacement is more involved, and therefore expensive, than changing a timing belt on a diesel engine.

If you're only doing 5,000 miles a year then you'll be doing an annual service rather a mileage service. Yes, the oil is expensive but the oil filter isn't particularly so. Air filter and cabin filter would have to be changed regardless of engine type and could probably be left for a couple of services or more. That leaves the diesel fuel filter to be changed and, again, that could be left in place for several services. There is just one more "extra" for the Blue series of engines, and that is the AdBlue additive. This can be easily topped up by the user, in fact I did our car over the weekend. The tank takes 17l and will undoubtedly last for more than 5,000 miles. In your position I would leave the AdBlue refill until you get the warning message on the dashboard that you only have 1700 miles left and at that point I would add 10l. It's not expensive to buy and even Aldi offer it occasionally.

How long the Eolys and FAP will last is determined by the type of driving undertaken. The Eolys level should be read (by Diagbox or a high-end code reader) at each service and will probably be good until some 70,000 - 90,000 miles has been travelled. The FAP itself should be good for 125,000 - 150,000 miles and possibly after your ownership.

Fuel economy is noticeably better than the petrol engine cars. We get an easy 60mpg and can raise it to mid or even high 60s with careful driving or long runs. This easily overcomes the higher price per litre.

There's one more thing that I feel needs mentioning. And that's the better driveability of a diesel engine. You can use low engine speeds that would choke a petrol engine. Our car will pull with ease from under 1000rpm and there's none of the revving thrashiness of a petrol engine. Admittedly our car has very high 5th and 6th gears but 65mph is probably only about 1200rpm.

I hope that balances out the views.
Thank you so much for this. It's very helpful. Could I please ask another related question, if I was looking at a number of cars up in the mileage range of 70k to 100k. What sort of things would be a positive as I looked through the service history? If a car with 80k miles had a cambelt and pump change but another with 75k hasn't. Would that make the 80k a better option assuming all other things equal!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
First question has to be - what car is it that you have seen? Model, engine and level of trim are relevant here.
These are the ones we can afford... and in which we are hoping we can be smart enough with the maintenance that we can make it work financially!

https://www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/201909162290813?onesearchad=Used&onesearchad=Nearly New&onesearchad=New&advertising-location=at_cars&make=PEUGEOT&postcode=en28bs&price-to=6000&sort=distance&maximum-mileage=100000&year-from=2015&model=308 SW&radius=1500&page=1

https://www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/201909051879173?onesearchad=Used&onesearchad=Nearly New&onesearchad=New&advertising-location=at_cars&make=PEUGEOT&postcode=en28bs&price-to=6000&sort=distance&maximum-mileage=100000&year-from=2015&model=308 SW&radius=1500&page=1

https://www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/201907079816794?onesearchad=Used&onesearchad=Nearly New&onesearchad=New&advertising-location=at_cars&make=PEUGEOT&postcode=en28bs&price-to=6000&sort=distance&maximum-mileage=100000&year-from=2015&model=308 SW&radius=1500&page=1

https://www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/201907300620222?onesearchad=Used&onesearchad=Nearly New&onesearchad=New&advertising-location=at_cars&make=PEUGEOT&postcode=en28bs&price-to=6000&sort=distance&maximum-mileage=100000&year-from=2015&model=308 SW&radius=1500&page=1

https://www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/201909252600116?onesearchad=Used&onesearchad=Nearly New&onesearchad=New&advertising-location=at_cars&make=PEUGEOT&postcode=en28bs&price-to=6000&sort=distance&maximum-mileage=100000&year-from=2015&model=308 SW&radius=1500&page=1

https://www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/201905248306148?onesearchad=Used&onesearchad=Nearly New&onesearchad=New&advertising-location=at_cars&make=PEUGEOT&postcode=en28bs&price-to=6000&sort=distance&maximum-mileage=100000&year-from=2015&model=308 SW&radius=1500&page=1

Sorry if that's not what you meant. THank you so much for the help though
 

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Whoof, that's quite a selection.

First things first: You've gone for the same sort of car that we ended up buying. The estate (SW) version which to my mind is so much more practical and better looking than the saloon. It's longer and the extra length is split between forward and rear of the rear wheels. The extra wheelbase length gives a noticeable improvement in space for the rear passengers - it turns poor into adequate!

We have the Active level of trim and frankly it's pretty well equipped. All the important stuff (SMEG+ radio, satnav, climate control, cruise control, stop & start, 6-speed gearbox) is there. It would have been nice to have front parking sensors, rear privacy glass, rear view camera, LED headlamps and electric folding door mirrors. They're all part of the Allure level and if they're important to you then you know what level you have to go for. But you can probably live without them. The CD player seems to be an optional item so be careful if that's important.

Now that our car is over three years old I do the servicing myself. I have background in the car trade so this holds no terrors (well, very little) for me. The oil and oil filter change is easy as are the cabin filter and air filter. I have yet to do the diesel filter and that does seem to be a bit tricky to get at. All the other stuff (oiling locks, wiper blades, tyres, etc) is just standard.

All the cars are getting a bit high in mileage and I would like to know how much Eolys is left so that I would have a rough idea of when I could expect some expense (or when to get shut of it!).

I would check all of them to make sure that the filler cap for the AdBlue has been changed (original is all blue, replacement is blue with a white centre). This should have been changed free of charge.
 

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Missed this bit
Could I please ask another related question, if I was looking at a number of cars up in the mileage range of 70k to 100k. What sort of things would be a positive as I looked through the service history? If a car with 80k miles had a cambelt and pump change but another with 75k hasn't. Would that make the 80k a better option assuming all other things equal!
Mmm, that's a difficult one as I would probably do the job myself and it would be cost of parts only. For 5k miles only I would say yes, the one that's been changed would be better. Others may disagree, of course.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Missed this bit
Could I please ask another related question, if I was looking at a number of cars up in the mileage range of 70k to 100k. What sort of things would be a positive as I looked through the service history? If a car with 80k miles had a cambelt and pump change but another with 75k hasn't. Would that make the 80k a better option assuming all other things equal!
Mmm, that's a difficult one as I would probably do the job myself and it would be cost of parts only. For 5k miles only I would say yes, the one that's been changed would be better. Others may disagree, of course.
That's very helpful. thank you. What is Eolys? Also how would I check?
 

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Eolys is the liquid that is added to the fuel in the fuel tank after you fill up. It's injected in minute quantities and helps to reduce the temperature at which the particles trapped in the FAP burn off. Unfortunately you can only read how much you have left by using a Diagbox or other high end reader.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Eolys is the liquid that is added to the fuel in the fuel tank after you fill up. It's injected in minute quantities and helps to reduce the temperature at which the particles trapped in the FAP burn off. Unfortunately you can only read how much you have left by using a Diagbox or other high end reader.


That's really helpful. If this has been topped up will it likely be writtenr in the service book?
 
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