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Just had brake discs and pads fitted, (see other post), the |Mech has informed me that one set of pads were completely worn, the other nearly brand new, I don't drive, my carer does, would they have become aware of this before they completely failed.

also, clearly the previous mech(someone who was kindly doing me favours) must have just replaced one set of pads on one wheel, surely this is dangerous?

tx.
 

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HI...I would want to clarify as to one set meaning....I hope he means front set...as opposed to front and rear sets...no one should fit just one wheel set...its just not done..if it has ......find another garage....good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi

No, he only replaced the rear discs today, so he must have meant one wheel, frightening.
 

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Brake materials must always be replaced in axle sets, pads on each side, and a disc on each side (but not necessarily discs and pads at the same time).

If only one wheel set of pads is wearing (and in consideration to your other post), I'd question if one of the pistons is seized. When braking hard do you / your carer feel the car pulling to one side?
 

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You say the mechanic who fitted the pads found one side badly worn and the other side nearly new. Did he in fact replace all the pads?. Some have inferre from your post that he only replaced one side.
What is important is why has one side worn?. Normally a seized or sticking calliper is the cause, which should be rectified before the new pads are installed.
It's hard to tell if rear brakes aren't working as they should, a similar problem with the front brakes would result in the car pulling to one side when braking.

Roger.
 

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I couldn't tell you how many times I have had a car in which has obviously had only one wheel's brake pads/shoes on an axle replaced. I wouldn't call it particularly dangerous in most cases except if the friction materials vary so much that it causes the car to pull severely to one side under braking. Better than having metal to metal on one side...:rolleyes: but definitely not ideal to only replace one side!
Replacing brake pads and not replacing or refacing discs is also not good practice. Discs wear unevenly and putting new pads in without refacing or replacing discs means that the new pads will only be braking on the high spots on the old disc until they manage to bed in. If one disc is badly worn, the pads on that side will take longer to fully bed onto the surface of the disc, this will also result in pulling to one side under braking, even if both sets of pads were replaced on a single axle, as that wheel will have less braking effort than the opposite wheel.
Best practice is new pads onto new or refaced discs. This is the only way I will do a brake job.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hi, yes, it was new brake disc/pads,

thanks for all the great info, will ask the mech who did latest work about it.
 

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I don't wholly agree with some of your points Will;:p
Replacing brake pads and not replacing or refacing discs is also not good practice.
Well, I have frequently replaced pads without touching the discs if they show normal but not excessive wear. Perhaps ideally discs should always be replaced with pads but there is no reason why slightly worn discs will not perform as well as new ones for all intents and purposes.

Discs wear unevenly and putting new pads in without refacing or replacing discs means that the new pads will only be braking on the high spots on the old disc until they manage to bed in.
New pads should bed in after ten or twenty normal stops, unless the discs are very badly worn, distorted or rusty.


Best practice is new pads onto new or refaced discs. This is the only way I will do a brake job.
That's fine, no doubt your car is maintained to a laudable standard and a credit to you:thumb:. But there is such a thing as overkill.

Roger.
 

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Bush mechanics will do what bush mechanics will do.. :rolleyes:
Necessity is the mother of invention:p. I have used a wire coat hanger as a plug lead, used the screenwash pump as an improvised fuel pump (managed 40 miles in a mk2 Ford Cortina on leaded petrol before it quit:)), got a Land Rover back to civilisation with a length of timber in place of the front offside leaf spring, jury rigged a crane caterpiller track with a length of iron bar to get it of the beach before the tide came in. My father claims when he was in Burma in ww2 the truck he was driving carrying fresh water burst its radiator, so he plumbed the water tank into the cooling system.:cool:



Roger.
 

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If one side was nearly worn to the metal but the other side was nearly new then there are 3 scenarios that I can think of that would cause this. In no particular order.....

1) A previous brake service only the nearly new side was replaced
2)The piston on the nearly new side is stuck so the brakes on that side weren't working
3)The piston on the worn side was stuck forcing the brakes to stay on on that side.
 

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Most likely seized slider pins, so the caliper doesn't position itself as it should and allow equal braking force from both sides. Needs stripping down and inspecting, sliders cleaning and freeing off. This is often caused by the use of copper grease on slider pins (which dries out) instead of silicon brake grease.
 
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