Peugeot Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'd like to fit a bike carrier (for 3 adult sized and 1 child size) to my coupé, but I'm unsure about the best option: is a roof carrier type better than a rear mounted one?
Would appreciate any recommendations for any particular types or brands.

Thanks in advance for your replies.

Sent from my 407 coupé using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
From my experiences with various bike racks, I've come to the following conclusions - bearing in mind I have 4 to carry as well...

Joint first place are roof mount and towbar mount. Both present challenges with parking (roof mount probably writes off using multi storey parks or height restricted ones, towbar mount for 4 bikes makes your car up to 5ft longer).

The least worrying type of roof mount is the type where you remove a wheel and clamp on the fork axle holes, but they have the hassle of removing the wheel. The type that have a downtube clamp are usually quicker, but have variable compatibility with frame tube shapes and sizes and may struggle with a child sized frame.

Towbar mounts obviously require a towbar, can be a time consuming pain to fit (and can block boot access) but are the most convenient for loading and unloading bikes. They do put the bikes right at target height should someone decide to run into your rear though.

4 bikes may or may not push the boundaries of roof rack or towbar nose weight limits too - depends on the bikes.

After a big gap, second to last place goes to high level strap on racks, and last place to low level strap on.

Strapping a rack on with any feeling of security is a challenge, the bikes always move about, they also have a tendency to slip around and damage the car paint. High level types usually seem to put load on the rear screen and put a pedal right next to the glass and low (and some high) level ones end up blocking the rear lights which is illegal, dangerous and stupid (unless you run a light board, which needs a towing socket, which usually means a towbar is there so just use a far better towbar mount instead).

Oh, and they invariably block boot access without undoing 15,000,000 straps and you can never get the bikes fitting the same way twice.

Best of a bad bunch for strap ons are the Saris ones - they're still crap, but they're the least crap I've seen ;)


It all comes down to them all being more or less compromised in some way, and which compromises you're prepared to make to fit around them.


Personally, I'm part way through fabricating a bolted mount for one bike (so it's fast and simple to throw just mine on) and putting together a set for the roof for the other 3 family bikes - that's to replace my current towbar mount one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
893 Posts
Towbar mount. Only way really, you can't fit a roof mount to a coupe, the bootlid itself is thermoformed plastic and I never felt comfortable mounting a single bike with a saris bones, let alone 3! (it's probably fine but who knows).

Genuine towbar mount is around £350 from peugeot though, with another £150 for the electrics. :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
From my experiences with various bike racks, I've come to the following conclusions - bearing in mind I have 4 to carry as well...

Joint first place are roof mount and towbar mount. Both present challenges with parking (roof mount probably writes off using multi storey parks or height restricted ones, towbar mount for 4 bikes makes your car up to 5ft longer).

The least worrying type of roof mount is the type where you remove a wheel and clamp on the fork axle holes, but they have the hassle of removing the wheel. The type that have a downtube clamp are usually quicker, but have variable compatibility with frame tube shapes and sizes and may struggle with a child sized frame.

Towbar mounts obviously require a towbar, can be a time consuming pain to fit (and can block boot access) but are the most convenient for loading and unloading bikes. They do put the bikes right at target height should someone decide to run into your rear though.

4 bikes may or may not push the boundaries of roof rack or towbar nose weight limits too - depends on the bikes.

After a big gap, second to last place goes to high level strap on racks, and last place to low level strap on.

Strapping a rack on with any feeling of security is a challenge, the bikes always move about, they also have a tendency to slip around and damage the car paint. High level types usually seem to put load on the rear screen and put a pedal right next to the glass and low (and some high) level ones end up blocking the rear lights which is illegal, dangerous and stupid (unless you run a light board, which needs a towing socket, which usually means a towbar is there so just use a far better towbar mount instead).

Oh, and they invariably block boot access without undoing 15,000,000 straps and you can never get the bikes fitting the same way twice.

Best of a bad bunch for strap ons are the Saris ones - they're still crap, but they're the least crap I've seen ;)


It all comes down to them all being more or less compromised in some way, and which compromises you're prepared to make to fit around them.


Personally, I'm part way through fabricating a bolted mount for one bike (so it's fast and simple to throw just mine on) and putting together a set for the roof for the other 3 family bikes - that's to replace my current towbar mount one.
Thanks for your detailed reply!
I think the tow bar mounted type would suit my needs best.
Are you switching from the tow bar mount type because of lack of access to the boot? Or is it something else?

Is removing the tow bar an easy job that can be done at home?



Sent from my 407 coupé using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Towbar mount. Only way really, you can't fit a roof mount to a coupe, the bootlid itself is thermoformed plastic and I never felt comfortable mounting a single bike with a saris bones, let alone 3! (it's probably fine but who knows).

Genuine towbar mount is around £350 from peugeot though, with another £150 for the electrics. :(
Aren't there ant aftermarket ones for the coupé?

Sent from my 407 coupé using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
Aren't there ant aftermarket ones for the coupé?
Google says there are, starting at about 130 quid.

Then you'll need electrics - a can compatible bypass relay is available for under 30 (I have one in my can 307) but these don't do the automatic disable of the parking sensors (if fitted) like the OEM box would, but they're much cheaper...

These prices are supply only - so it'd be DIY or plus fitting costs...

If you have parking sensors, the two hole mount ball may trigger them, the swan neck type shouldn't - but the swan neck type limits your choice of cycle racks to the clamp type only.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top