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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dear All,
My 1st post with you :) .
My car specs first: 2005, 2.0L Petrol engine, autom. transmission, 86K kms.
Last week, the car engine stalls at trafficlights or stops after lifting my foot from the gas pedal and on uphill as well. No warning lights did lit up, as if the computer wasnt aware of that. No error on the log as well.
My garage and a authorized car lab did two things:
*the garage cleaned all the petrol related components incl. injectors
*the lab did a sofware upload to the latest available. also ran a "test drive".
But still,
stalls and "almost stalls" at stops.
Your kind advice is highly appreciated.

Best regards,
M.D.
 
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Hi - and welcome.

Even though no codes were produced, if the car is still suffering, codes may well now be recorded.

When things start to fail, a sensor or actuator can be still within tolerance, hence no code. Eventaully it will go to extreme and register a code.

Does the engine run ok most of the time?

How often does the car fail? Is it only when you come to a stop or take your foot off the gas?

When the engine dies, does it cut out instantly, or does it cough/splutter at all?

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks David for your prompt reply,

Most of the time, engine runs ok, although I have a certain (subjective) feeling the car is less "energetic", especially whenever kick-downs are concerned.

This happens at stops and after lifting my feet off the gas. 50% of cases.

Short splutter, quietly shuts off :confused:

Best regards,
MD
 
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Could be, though there isn't much on the EW intake that can go south. T'is a plastic inlet though, and the odd one cracking isn't unknown.

Alas, our hero doesn't indicate if it's intermittent or constant - if it's the former i'd say EGR, the latter then possibly inlet, but TPS and MAP sensors on their way out can do the same.
 

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it sounds like an idle problem and TPS/MAF sensors would throw a code supposedly ( EGR probably not as its mechanical ) but most ive found with this issue is a vacuum line and the latest computer cant find that they only see a fuel air mix problem but as its at idle mainly Im guessing vacuum line on the inlet,

it seems they didn't do a thorough test and relied on computer testing when they should have took the velvet gloves off and got in there:lol: .
 
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I'm not 100% sure without checking, but i think the EGR on the EW will log a code but won't illumnate the EML as it's not usually a critical failure.

The sensors will log a code if they're registering out of parameter - it they fail in such a way that they still indicate readings within tcorrect limits (such as the TPS, which can fail internally and give the same reading constantly instead of being variable with the throttle opening) then it won't log at all.

Agreed with you that there's too much reliance on trouble codes - 8 out of 10 faults I find perfectly well without resorting to Planet, as a logged fault doesn't indicate that sensor is faulty - t'is often a fault elsewhere causing a perfectly healthy sensor to read off. This is one of those jobs that would have had me reaching for Grandads WD40 for a good spray around the inlet manifold with the engine idling. Old tricks and all that.u
 

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we have something in common then ( new cars still need the old mechanics to sort them ) computers don't solve they just guide!,

as you say 8 out of 10 fault codes are bogus but the dealers and other garages use that to gain money and that's why these sites are important,

only problem with that is getting people to realise:confused:
 
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True chum. People talk utter rubbish about new engines being 'harder' to work on. It's no harder than stripping the carbs on an old Morris to set the float height, or setting the ignition by ear as the old hands could do - it's simply a different skill set, often substituting the spanner for the multimeter.

Indeed, there's often less work involved - I mean, when was the last time you owned a car that needed grease pumped through the trunnions every 1500 miles?

The only real difference is that, for example, electronic fuel management parts usually need binning and replacing when they pack up, but that old Morris carb can be revived with new jets and a gasket set.

Aside from that, it's no harder or easier - just different.
 

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One diference I note is that manufacturers (Pug very guilty here) are not releasing info to eg Haynes so we're on our own. The first time I look at a job I have to think extra hard about how much force I use to disconnect something, what I could break, or what might fall into a bit of the engine I can't reach. But yes, once you get over the fact that you can't see any of the usual gubbins, some jobs are relatively easy. No I don't miss contacts strobe light and chalk either!
Referring to earlier post, my blanked EGR is creating error code P0400 and this results in the engine warning light coming on. Freeze data says it occurs at 84 deg, meaning, I think, the extra petrol in the exhaust is only described as an error when operating temperature is reached.
 
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sonichedgehog said:
Referring to earlier post, my blanked EGR is creating error code P0400 and this results in the engine warning light coming on. Freeze data says it occurs at 84 deg, meaning, I think, the extra petrol in the exhaust is only described as an error when operating temperature is reached.
Thanks Sonic, that's useful info.

did you remove yours entirely and blank off the port?
 

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No, because I think disconnection of the block connector to the EGR stops the engine operating (I'm about 90% sure of that, haven't fully tested it out). It's not just a single relay, there are about 4 circuits probably with some input/output going on, and the ECU interpreting the result and perhaps making all sorts of adjustments. Safer to leave everything in place and just close the ports. Did that by removing the ECU, making a thin metal blanking plate and refixing with the plate between cylinder head and ECU body. Got the idea from Pugbod who's been most helpful, also looking at some of the manufactured blanking plates for other cars.
 

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the code is normal because the rest of the EGR system is still there so you need to rout out all they systems needs and blank them,

you must leave the EGR valve in place and connected even though its not working as its part of the system and will be noticed by the ECU if electrical connections are removed remember your trying to fool the system that its still there.
 
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