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I haven't seen my exact problem discussed; if it has already been answered, I'd be glad to be directed towards that answer.

I have a 406 estate first registered in October 2001, which I understand makes it a Phase 2 model. Not surprisingly, after so many years and so many depressions, the larger rubber button on the key has disintegrated. I enquired at my local Peugeot dealer about replacement buttons; I was told that they couldn't supply them, but that they are readily available online.

1. I looked online and saw that numerous sellers were offering what appeared to be an identical third party product (so presumably all produced in the same Chinese workshop): large and small buttons linked together. I bought one of these pairs quite cheaply, only to find that the larger button was marginally too small in diameter and as a result easily disappeared into the fob. NBG

2. A second online search found an offer of a 'genuine Peugeot' button, described as end of line, from a specialist seller of French car parts. This was a little more expensive, but when it arrived it was clearly a genuine Peugeot product, apparently identical with the key's original button. However, when I came to fit it I found that it was slightly too large in diameter, and only with great difficulty could it be forced into the orifice, when it bulged up from the surface contour of the fob. On pressing the bulge, it reversed itself into the fob and wouldn't come up again, making it a once-only procedure. Again, NBG (though the seller readily refunded the cost).

3. I then approached a specialist dealer in Peugeot parts often mentioned on this site. At first he thought it couldn't help, but then discovered that he had a key which had apparently been cut by Peugeot but never sold, and suggested that I might like to buy the key and swap into it the blade, circuit board and transponder chip from mine. He sent me images, in which his key appeared to be identical with mine, so I decided to go ahead and purchase it; this was an appreciably more expensive way of replacing a malfunctioning rubber button, but if it solved the problem, so be it. Only it didn't. When the key arrived I opened it up and found to my dismay that the circuit board of my key would not fit inside the fob of the new one; the boards were differently shaped. Nor could I swap the button from this new key into my fob, because once again it was too big. NBG with knobs on, as we used to say. Though I must in fairness say that the seller refunded the cost without a quibble.

4. Another Internet search produced a YouTube video (www.youtube.com/watch?v=TlzZ7KkWZjo) showing how the gubbins of a working key could, with a little elementary DIY, be transferred into a third party fob shell. I can do that, I thought, so duly bought one of these fobs online, but when I opened it and attempted to put the circuit board inside, I found the same problem that I had at 3 - the board will not fit in the shell case (see image)

Why Peugeot found it necessary to muck about with the size of these buttons only they could explain; the tooling costs involved must been out of all proportion to any perceived benefit. However it occurs to me that possibly they used the same size button as that in my Phase 2 key, in the keys of other models. Does anyone know? And more to the point, can anyone suggest a way forward for me?
90951
 

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I haven't seen my exact problem discussed; if it has already been answered, I'd be glad to be directed towards that answer.

I have a 406 estate first registered in October 2001, which I understand makes it a Phase 2 model. Not surprisingly, after so many years and so many depressions, the larger rubber button on the key has disintegrated. I enquired at my local Peugeot dealer about replacement buttons; I was told that they couldn't supply them, but that they are readily available online.

1. I looked online and saw that numerous sellers were offering what appeared to be an identical third party product (so presumably all produced in the same Chinese workshop): large and small buttons linked together. I bought one of these pairs quite cheaply, only to find that the larger button was marginally too small in diameter and as a result easily disappeared into the fob. NBG

2. A second online search found an offer of a 'genuine Peugeot' button, described as end of line, from a specialist seller of French car parts. This was a little more expensive, but when it arrived it was clearly a genuine Peugeot product, apparently identical with the key's original button. However, when I came to fit it I found that it was slightly too large in diameter, and only with great difficulty could it be forced into the orifice, when it bulged up from the surface contour of the fob. On pressing the bulge, it reversed itself into the fob and wouldn't come up again, making it a once-only procedure. Again, NBG (though the seller readily refunded the cost).

3. I then approached a specialist dealer in Peugeot parts often mentioned on this site. At first he thought it couldn't help, but then discovered that he had a key which had apparently been cut by Peugeot but never sold, and suggested that I might like to buy the key and swap into it the blade, circuit board and transponder chip from mine. He sent me images, in which his key appeared to be identical with mine, so I decided to go ahead and purchase it; this was an appreciably more expensive way of replacing a malfunctioning rubber button, but if it solved the problem, so be it. Only it didn't. When the key arrived I opened it up and found to my dismay that the circuit board of my key would not fit inside the fob of the new one; the boards were differently shaped. Nor could I swap the button from this new key into my fob, because once again it was too big. NBG with knobs on, as we used to say. Though I must in fairness say that the seller refunded the cost without a quibble.

4. Another Internet search produced a YouTube video (www.youtube.com/watch?v=TlzZ7KkWZjo) showing how the gubbins of a working key could, with a little elementary DIY, be transferred into a third party fob shell. I can do that, I thought, so duly bought one of these fobs online, but when I opened it and attempted to put the circuit board inside, I found the same problem that I had at 3 - the board will not fit in the shell case (see image)

Why Peugeot found it necessary to muck about with the size of these buttons only they could explain; the tooling costs involved must been out of all proportion to any perceived benefit. However it occurs to me that possibly they used the same size button as that in my Phase 2 key, in the keys of other models. Does anyone know? And more to the point, can anyone suggest a way forward for me? View attachment 90951
[/QUHiOTE]Hi I. have a 2000 406 that developed same problem a few year's back. i went online, found a guy i London are who sorted both the malfuncion and the key fob. worked a treat ever since. Will see if i have any history on Ebay. Just looked and cant see it atm. looked on Ebay to see if i could spot but no joy. certainly didnt cost me £24 as some theif is charging
 
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