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Discussion Starter #1
Being into cutting costs, does anyone have any knowledge about extracting and replacing just the rubber bit from the expensive holder?.
The plastic clips at each end look as if they can be removed......hopefully I can without any breakage.
 

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Not only are the rubbers a pain to replace, making sure the rubber goes through every holding clip, some of the sprung pressure bars may now be weak which would result in the blade not being evenly held against the glass so wouldn't follow the profile correctly.

For the time, effort and possible poor result it simply isn't worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Not only are the rubbers a pain to replace, making sure the rubber goes through every holding clip, some of the sprung pressure bars may now be weak which would result in the blade not being evenly held against the glass so wouldn't follow the profile correctly.

For the time, effort and possible poor result it simply isn't worth it.
I've had a look at the ends and the clips look eminently removable and should easily accept a new rubber ........just need to work out how the clip releases.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I got one end clip off but the rubber didn't release as if held mid point.
It goes against the grain to 'submit' having 'tuned' my dad's FE Holden in the late fifties and only now submitting to 'fixed price servicing' for both our cars.
I guess the gold price servicing includes the gold plated wiper assembly too.......one could get quite cynical.
The fact that cars only have a 'design life' of ten years is a factor also.
 

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My experience is that modern cars far outlast cars from the 60's - 80's.

I had company cars for over 20 years and when I had to buy my own car in 2012 my funds were extremely limited and I had to look at cars that were at least 10 years old. I was a bit worried as prior to getting my first company car, a 10 year old car was more rust than steel. Fortunately I was pleasantly surprised that cars of that age were still generally rust free without having to have major welding done to them.

As for the wipers, I 've seen many scored windscreens because just the wiper rubber was replaced. The hooks on the arms that hold the rubbers had weakend to the point that the new rubbers didn't sit correctly and were dragged out allowing the arm to contact the screen. For the sake of a few quid it's not worth risking an expensive windscreen. At least back then you could replace the screen with nothing more than soapy water, a length of string and a rubber mallet unlike today's bonded screens.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The modern car is almost on a par with Mercs when it comes to bodies but like the Merc the expensive emissions related equipment such as the myriad sensors, turbo, injectors etc, after ten years, quickly make them a financial write off IMO.
Highly desirable white goods meant to be recycled.
 

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The modern car is almost on a par with Mercs when it comes to bodies but like the Merc the expensive emissions related equipment such as the myriad sensors, turbo, injectors etc, after ten years, quickly make them a financial write off IMO.
Highly desirable white goods meant to be recycled.
I wouldn't touch a modern diesel, but the petrol cars are a different proposition. My daughter's 206 is 15 years old and runs perfectly. The sensors are cheap as chips on EBay, and it doesn't have a turbo. I have a Grand Vitara which is 19 years old, and replacement parts are reasonable and rarely needed. A new radiator cost me £43 delivered. I wouldn't buy a car less than 10 years old because of the depreciation, but older, well cared-for cars are a good investment.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I wouldn't touch a modern diesel, but the petrol cars are a different proposition. My daughter's 206 is 15 years old and runs perfectly. The sensors are cheap as chips on EBay, and it doesn't have a turbo. I have a Grand Vitara which is 19 years old, and replacement parts are reasonable and rarely needed. A new radiator cost me £43 delivered. I wouldn't buy a car less than 10 years old because of the depreciation, but older, well cared-for cars are a good investment.
Yep
Love our pugs but harsh reality of the disposable car today mainly driven by emissions regulations and the complexity to meet the every more stringent standards.
Fuel cell / battery seems inevitable and not long off........I don't mind the prospect of max torque from 0 -
 
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