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Hello forumites. I just wondered how many Peugeot owners use the spanner symbol on the dash as an the indicator of when to service their cars. My wife has just been told she needs a new engine at 42,000 miles in a two and a half year old car and as the servicing was not done at the correct mileages, is not covered by the three year warranty. We bought the car second hand from a main dealer who overran the first service by 600 miles and we did the same so that cumulatively we were quite adrift by the third service. Peugeot UK will not allow any deviation from service intervals. We do not use the main dealer for servicing as their prices are unaffordable for us but use a Citreon specialist and needless to say anything they have put in or on the car is unacceptable as well. We have only had Peugeots or Citreons for 20 years, but will now be looking for a vehicle that doesn't rely on electronics to make it go, ie something old! Any ideas!
 
J

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My Astra is a bit more sensible - relies on electronics but it isn't ridiculous.
 

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how come she has told she needs a new engine?? she snapped a timing belt??

most cars from around 2000 all use electronic sensors so if you want one without all that, your looking at a banger.
 

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Steady on John, I was going to suggest my Renault 9 but its sulking now. Its 1994 and has 18 months mot left. It is gas/benzine but a test drive might be expensive where its kept at present.
 

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They all talk big with warranties and promises until its time for them to cough up, then they go deaf. Its a very low mileage to warrant an engine change though, what on earth's happened to it?
 
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Yes, it's lowish mileage but it's missed a service and the 3 it has received have been late. These motors are also very sensitive to the correct oil, and the fact that someone couldn't be arsed to service it on time (or even at all in one case) make sit highly likely that when it did finally receive some attention that it was done on the cheap, nasty oil of the wrong grade (5w/30 fully synth low ash is essential, not desiarble, but essential - Ford even send oil off for analysis before authorising claims on the same engine in their cars, that's how rampant the problem of cheapness is with maintaining these motors)

TBH, in all my years as a consumer, and my few short years on the spanners, I've very little first hand experience of manufacturers warranty companies, or aftermarket mechanical breakdown insurers not coughing up when something is genuinely covered and there is no dispute about the cause.

Sure, it happens, but it's bigged up hugely.

HGF - failed on my 207 - duly replaced without argument (turned out I disliked to 207 anyway, so I sold it, so that's by the by)

The well documented faults with my 1st 3008 - rust, turbo failure, rough running, bits coming off in my hand, Peugeot positively raced to fix all the faults, and when i lost my rag and rejected it there was little hassle getting it replaced.

When the handbake button broke in my 2nd 3008, even though i think I actually broke it myself with my hamfisted persistent faffing about with it :rolleyes: , fixed swiftly, smoothly, without so much as a murmur on the warranty front.

Similar stories with my Suburau and BMW - as faults arose, they were fixed without complaint.

By far a clear majority of people are satisfied, and such generalisations are not only unture, but serve to do nothing but confuse the situation and divert attention from the genuine problem at hand - getting ones motor fixed. Of the cases that do remain, by far the majority are in some way down to someone somewhere fecking something up with the mainetenance or the schedule somewhere in the cars life.

I'm not sure blaming electronics is any way of diverting attention from the penny pinching maintenance. If yopu dont want something covered in sensors then buy and old nacker, a bicycle, and then go live in a cave and treat your ilnesses with leeches while you're about it.

Moral of the story - you may think you can't afford proper by-the-book servicing, but this example illustrates beautifully that you can't afford not to.

Now, I'm off to save money on my heating bills by setting fire to my house to keep warm...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Moral of the story - you may think you can't afford proper by-the-book servicing, but this example illustrates beautifully that you can't afford not to.

Now, I'm off to save money on my heating bills by setting fire to my house to keep warm...

Obviously a main dealer in the making! I can't see where I said that a service was missed. I suppose taking the car to a Citreon specialist is our crime here and we fully accept that. The point of my post is to point out that the spanner warning on the dash should be treated with extreme cation if services are late as the effect is cumulative.
 
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Well if you missed the service by 600 miles each time it doesn't add up "cumulatively" as you say. The first one was missed by 600 miles. Then the next one was missed by 600 miles (was it the interval or mileage since last service?).

If the car had missed it by the book by 600 miles each time then it was done regularly. 600 miles is nothing and if Peugeot engines are that sensitive then I will never go back to them.

Anyway, who told you that you need a new engine? Has the car completely stopped?
 
C

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600 miles is exactly 100 miles beyond the warranty tolerance. You enter into a contract re the warranty when you buy the car, tough tit when you break it and they keep their wallet closed if you didnt maintain your obligations. In any case, how late we're the services? 12.5k miles intervals, its possible this car has gone several thousand miles past one of them.

And virtually all small bore high out put motors from everyone are sensitive to lube now. As emissions laws force manufacturers to use ever smaller engines, but the public demand no drop in performance, then this is going to become increasingly prevalent. Can you see the new 1.0 litre 125 BHP Focus engine being happy to miss services or be done late, even by a small margin?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Chopper. You are assuming that we bought the car from new and ignored the servicing schedule. We did not. We bought it from the main dealer at 12633 miles. It was given it's first service (the 12k one) the day before we took delivery of it. The main dealer was the one who decided to ignore correct procedure. What we did after that was immaterial as far as the manufacturers warranty was concerned.
Jazz The deal with the spanner indicator thing is that it starts counting down to the next service in preset increments. So if it starts it's countdown 600miles late and the next service is done 600 miles later than when it tells you to the car is now 1200 miles late when compared to the actual mileage of the car. If you are late by say 600m on one service you need to be 600m early on the next if you are going to use the spanner to help you look after the car.
I suppose the moral of this story is we were shafted by the main dealer before we had even bought the car, we just made it worse by following their example and they are the ones telling us we now need a new engine.
 
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Moral of the story - you may think you can't afford proper by-the-book servicing, but this example illustrates beautifully that you can't afford not to.

Now, I'm off to save money on my heating bills by setting fire to my house to keep warm...

Obviously a main dealer in the making! I can't see where I said that a service was missed. I suppose taking the car to a Citreon specialist is our crime here and we fully accept that. The point of my post is to point out that the spanner warning on the dash should be treated with extreme cation if services are late as the effect is cumulative.
A Citroen specialist who hasn't used an OE filter, hence any hope of warranty evaporating faster than a mouthful of bootleg vodka. I think that's a bit hard cos when I'm span nearing (I work PT as a sole trader specialising on 107s and C1s - definitely not a main dealer in the making!) I offer the choice of genuine OE parts or quality pattern parts, so it's the punters choice.
 

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i was just reading you post before last chopper and i totally agree modern cars are now becoming more sensitive to the oil and quality... it was funny when you mentioned the new 1.0L petrol focus. i was talking about this to some other fellas and they totally agree that this engine being 1.0L, 3 pots will work alot harder and thus require more of a rigorous service schedule with a high quality oil.

i also see your point OP on the spanner, basically your saying to people..."dont ignore the spanner, get it seen soon as....to keep your warranty" i too have had bad experiences of warranty, covered by warrantydirect. turned out it wasnt worth the paper it was written on. now i dont have any, and pay for repairs myself and even get them done at dealer. parts and labour are far cheaper nowadays (dependant on marque)
 
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Whey I'm chuffed I have what I do, so I'll be keeping this in good nick until I can understand the flimsy new motors better.

The garage he bought it from had already skipped out 100 miles of the service, is there no way to plant it on them to sort it out? I'm guessing it's been a while so probably not.

Well I'll happily say that if a car has been neglected and irregularly serviced then yes the owner is at fault. However, 600 miles is nothing and wouldn't affect any "normal" car.

Also - if a garage is paid to service a motor and puts the wrong oil in, they need to be monitored. Obviously the problems won't show immediately but you can't go back to a garage after 2k miles and say they are to blame for a car knacking. The 2k was figurative by the way.

Along with all these sensitive changes there needs to be stricter laws on the garages providing the services.

It's ridiculous that it's becoming so delicate.
 

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Well my warranty was useless but Ive mentioned that enough previously, it was due to the dealer taking the money for it and pocketing it, not completing the registration.
These engines are miles apart from the old donkey engines from the past. Its a shame they are no longer simple and able to absorb negligence, but low emissions are needed and now we have to pay for it.
 
J

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Well my warranty was useless but Ive mentioned that enough previously, it was due to the dealer taking the money for it and pocketing it, not completing the registration.
These engines are miles apart from the old donkey engines from the past. Its a shame they are no longer simple and able to absorb negligence, but low emissions are needed and now we have to pay for it.
I know what you mean. Couldn't imagine a diesel 306 engine falling to pieces because the oil was the tiniest bit different.

They'll have to be careful, if they make them any more sensitive to the oil then the cars will have to be kept in an oven so the oil doesn't go cold and thick!!!
 

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Most modern Petrol & diesel engines will go 4.000--5.000 miles over the specified intervals without any problem . My 308 Petrol is 20.000 miles between changes & my Skoda Superb 1.9 TDi was 18.000 between changes . If Peugeot diesels are that fragile they out to get out of the business & stick to Bicycles .

I dont dislike my 308 ..BUT I certainly dont want a diesel vesion ( Drove brand new one --nasty thing ) or anything with a DPF ( & certainly not one where you have to shove a can of Gunk through it every 2 yrs at the cost of £300--£600 . & I dont do Manual gearboxes from Peugeot they have a super unreliable ( Read this Forum ) Dual Mass flywheel ( Even Ford have given up on that silly idea )
 
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Most diesels nowadays have DMF don't they? My Astra does. That's not really a problem though, when it goes, get a solid conversion done. Simple.
 
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Most diesels nowadays have DMF don't they? My Astra does. That's not really a problem though, when it goes, get a solid conversion done. Simple.
Not aways. If you fit a solid flywheel to a Pajero/shogun that has had a DMF then it nearly amost certain it'll break the crankshaft afterwards.
Is it worth it? NO.
 
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You had to ruin my moment eh...

So would a solid conversion on my 150bhp Astra be a crap idea?
 
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