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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, I'm new to the forums and of course I looking to call on the experience of others from this form in bringing my 2004 307 SW 1.6HDI back to life

I'm going to have to do the following myself because I can't afford the €2,000 to pay a garage/mechanic.

Remove and clean the catalytic converter and then rebuild it back into the car.

Change the timing belt and associated sundries

Replace the glow plugs.

I have no idea what the part number is from the catalytic converter or how to remove it. Drawings/PDF files would be much appreciated. Or does anyone know where I can buy a second hand FAP/DPA/Catalytic converter (on the cheap of course).

The timing belt is more complex I think so depending on the information I receive I’ll make a decision on whether to pay €500 to the mechanic. Can anyone give me the Bosch part number?

Replacing the Glow Plugs is also awkward because I have been told that they reside under the motor air intake filter. Has anyone got an instruction manual with drawings?
Any idea what the Bosch or NGK part numbers would be?

The VIN number from my car is VF33H9HZC83833787.

Should it look like I can do the work myself I shall take step by step pictures in order to create a how to do it yourself guide for other 307 owners.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Confirm Fault Codes

Has anyone on the form got the official Peugeot Fault code/diagnostics list for the 307 1.6 HDI

I already know most of the descriptions for the following fault codes but need confirmation

P0087
P0093
P1113
P1351
P1447
P2408.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for that betty,

I thought as much, I'm sucking air into the lines and I would guess that the fuel filter is also fcukde $%^#*

Time to replace the lines and fuel filter.
 

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before spending any more money, im not sure about the build of your fuel filter...but check the rubber gasket that helps seal the unit. if that is not sitting properly this can let air in. happened to me and i couldnt start the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I checked already, Put the car on a lift and removed the under plate (just for good measure)

The fuel filter is an awkward item to access (under all the air pipes between the battery and the motor)

I have the Haynes 307 maintenance book arriving this weekend so I guess its study time :-(

A lot better than paying €2,000 to a mechanic for €500 worth of work and parts.

I can get a new fuel filter for €45
New glow plugs ((NGK)) set of 4 for €40
New Relay for the glow plugs €40
Cleaning treatment for the DPF €200 (cleaned via the pressure measurement pipes)
New injectors (if necessary) €70
New Distribution belt and associated parts €110 (if needed)

A mechanic to replace the injectors and distribution belt €180 (about 2 to 4 hours work)

Necessary Parts total €325
Extras if needed (distribution belt and injectors) €180
Man Hours if needed €180
Total (including extras) €685


Via my local dealer (car dealer not drugs :D )
Distribution belt and work €450
Replace DPF (they won't clean it) €750
Replace Glow Plugs €290
Replace relay €120
Replace injectors €200
Diagnostic testing after the work is finished €80
Total €1890

And that's without other surprises.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well I may be moving to Germany for a while (work thing) and as far as I know I have to have front mist lamps on the car.

Unfortunately in the Netherlands it's not required (a total bcith when fog decends)

I want to get a replacement set of front lights that have an integrated mist lamp.

Anyone able to point me in the right direction?
 

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Wonder would it be an idea if cheaper to go to a scrap yard and source a full bumper with fog lights that fit your car and colour ,307`s have plugs in the engine bay for fog lights if i mind right.
 
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Hysteria said:
I checked already, Put the car on a lift and removed the under plate (just for good measure)

The fuel filter is an awkward item to access (under all the air pipes between the battery and the motor)

I have the Haynes 307 maintenance book arriving this weekend so I guess its study time :-(

A lot better than paying €2,000 to a mechanic for €500 worth of work and parts.

I can get a new fuel filter for €45
New glow plugs ((NGK)) set of 4 for €40
New Relay for the glow plugs €40
Cleaning treatment for the DPF €200 (cleaned via the pressure measurement pipes)
New injectors (if necessary) €70
New Distribution belt and associated parts €110 (if needed)

A mechanic to replace the injectors and distribution belt €180 (about 2 to 4 hours work)

Necessary Parts total €325
Extras if needed (distribution belt and injectors) €180
Man Hours if needed €180
Total (including extras) €685


Via my local dealer (car dealer not drugs :D )
Distribution belt and work €450
Replace DPF (they won't clean it) €750
Replace Glow Plugs €290
Replace relay €120
Replace injectors €200
Diagnostic testing after the work is finished €80
Total €1890

And that's without other surprises.

Question, how can the DPF be cleaned via the pressure measurement pipes??

Also you don't need to replace the glowplug relay.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
http://www.ae-tech.nl/revisie/dieseltechniek/

This is the crowd, they informed me via email that they pump a fluid directly into the DPF and cause it to catalyse while the engine is not running. It's a guaranteed service

The fluid is not the Eylos or JLM make
http://www.dieselparticulatefiltercleaner.com/

But apparently they have their own variant that does the job. If it saves me having to rip the entire front of the car to get at the filter then I'm for it.

The other option is to separate the turbo from the main motor block and stick a vacuum pump on it.
Then tie of the rubber pipes leading to the pressure sensor so as not to clog them up (or screw up the pressure sensor)
Remove the sensor mounted on the side of the DPF and blank it off using an (8 or 10 mm) bolt
After that put the car on a lift and remove the under tray before uncoupling the flexible connection between the DPF and the exhaust system.
After that I would have to use compressed air to blow as much crud from the filter in the direction of the turbo (vacuum) as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
bettyswollocks said:
Wonder would it be an idea if cheaper to go to a scrap yard and source a full bumper with fog lights that fit your car and colour ,307`s have plugs in the engine bay for fog lights if i mind right.
No chance of finding those in the Netherlands :tantrum:

Cars here aren't required to have front fog lights so they aren't offered.

Any idea what the cost would be for a new front bumper including the fog lights?
 
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Hysteria said:
http://www.ae-tech.nl/revisie/dieseltechniek/

This is the crowd, they informed me via email that they pump a fluid directly into the DPF and cause it to catalyse while the engine is not running. It's a guaranteed service

The fluid is not the Eylos or JLM make
http://www.dieselparticulatefiltercleaner.com/

But apparently they have their own variant that does the job. If it saves me having to rip the entire front of the car to get at the filter then I'm for it.

The other option is to separate the turbo from the main motor block and stick a vacuum pump on it.
Then tie of the rubber pipes leading to the pressure sensor so as not to clog them up (or screw up the pressure sensor)
Remove the sensor mounted on the side of the DPF and blank it off using an (8 or 10 mm) bolt
After that put the car on a lift and remove the under tray before uncoupling the flexible connection between the DPF and the exhaust system.
After that I would have to use compressed air to blow as much crud from the filter in the direction of the turbo (vacuum) as possible.
The only cleaning procedure to clean the particle filter DIY style is to remove it and powerwash it after soaking it in a bucket of traffic film remover or equal. Removal of the DPF is a hour job at max if you're not used to it.
 
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Yes will work. Going a bit too far with drying it thought. Bolt is straight up and go for a good hard drive. Trust me, it'll be dry then!!
 

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davidireland said:
Yes will work. Going a bit too far with drying it thought. Bolt is straight up and go for a good hard drive. Trust me, it'll be dry then!!
I just removed mine ,hell with all that washing crap :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Anyone have a step by step instruction on how to remove the DPF in under an hour?

My car is a 2004 307 SW 1.6HDi
Vin number is VF33H9HZC83833787.

If I can get a step by step I can get my local mechanic to do most of the work off the books.

Access to the filter is behind the radiator :nono:

I wouldn't mind removing the filter (for less maintenance, etc) but there's a mandate/rule in the Netherlands now that states from 2011 all diesels have to have a DPF and all cars that originally had a DPF may NOT have them removed. :mad:

If you know anyone that can read Dutch then here's the link. Even worse news it's going to become an EU directive very shortly.

http://www.rijksoverheid.nl/onderwerpen/auto/roetfilters?ns_campaign=Thema-Verkeer_en_vervoer&ro_adgrp=Auto_roetfilter&ns_mchannel=sea&ns_source=google&ns_linkname=+roetfilter&ns_fee=0.00

BTW a side note for an overview of what a MAP Sensor does here's a link
http://www.bosch.com.au/content/language1/downloads/Map_Sensor_Purpose_and_Function.pdf
 
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