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Following a clutch and flywheel replacement, my gears had been difficult to get into 2nd, 4th and 6th. Things finaly came to blow when, at the time, driving in the fast lane of the M3, the gear cable snapped, forcing me to the hard shoulder and an hour wait for Green Flag to turn up in the sodding rain at 12 at night.

As soon as I got home I purchased a breakers gear cable/stick and module unit (as the cables dont appear to be available as spares). New was £180 from my local dealer and they wouldnt get it for 2 days longer than I could get it from the breaker.

I havent received it yet, but was wondering if anyone has done this themselves? Ive already located the broken cable and removed the broken end off the gearbox link. I dont have a Haynes manual... but was hoping someone else on here has done this and can add some advice? Im not sure if, once the cables fitted, the rest needs adjusting...
 

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Hi

Yes, did the job myself. In total it took me 12 hours... 12 long long hours! I called a mobile mechanic beforehand who said he wouldnt want to try it and I can now see why!

It would be very very helpful to read the haynes manual for your model first, I downloaded a copy for the 5 speed 307's and it misses out a lot of things for the reverse gear lift mechanism. I used the manual as I went but if you can read and memorize it beforehand it would be a lot better.

First off, I removed the battery, battery cover and box, air filter assembly, battery tray (mostly bolts in the top of the tray but theres one really annoying one which you have to remove the wheel inner trim for and get to from the wheel arch). For this one, I removed the wheel, drilled a hole in the wheel arch plastic and took the bolt out this way. Fortunately I judged the area for drilling perfectly and got the bolt out easily. Once the battery tray was removed it was easy to get to the top of the gear linkage and take the cables off. The reverse cable requires a torx tool and you need to go through the wheel arch again - no drilling, the bolt is quite visable and easy to access. This part pops out of the gearbox housing with a little force. Once done with that, the outter cables will need to be removed from the holders, the metal clips are an absolute PIG but will come out with some wiggling and a tiny flat blade screwdriver. I then put string around the cable ends so that I could use these to feed the new cables through once it went backwards through the car. Moving to the inside, the centre console needs to be unscrewed and taken up (but not off). The gear gaiter needs to be taken up and the bolts from the gear stick housing off. Then remove the heater ducts from either side of the gearstick housing area. There was a rectangular connector which I also took off to give me a lot more room. Pull the gearstick up and backwards whilst lifting the centre console. This should give you enough room to get to the rubber gaiter which the cables go through. The Haynes manual will tell you to get under the car and remove a plastic clip and the exhaust or something like that. I didnt, I struggled getting the gaiter out BUT i did it after much swearing, pulling and tearing of my hands! Then you should find the whole assembly comes out from the engine bay, whilst still lifting the centre console and doing a bit of jiggery pokery. You should then be able to completely remove the cables and stick from the car and start to install the new one. Use the string to pull the new cables back through, use a LOT of lube on the new gaiter and bash it in with a rubber mallet and stick wide enough to "push" it into place. Dont forget to use plenty of suitable grease on the ball joints. Installing is pretty much reverse of removal, but a lot quicker.

If you give it a go and need more advice, let me know, I can certainly try to help :)

Oh and one last tip... prepare the bandages for your hands... mine are still recovering after 2 weeks!!!
 

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thanks for that, geez those 12 hours sound long indeed!

Mine's a 1.4 petrol so only 5 gears and reverse.

Was thinking I might drop the gearbox anyway as the clutch is pretty high, so probably wants replacing, so I guess the access is gonna be easier with the gear box removed but I will have a proper look tomorrow and let you know,
but thanks for the words of Wisdom!!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ahh ok! Yes, the Haynes manual I have covers yours. Its a bit more simple.

I met a guy the other week who said he's changed the cables in 40 minutes... Im not sure how but I cant seem to find a lot of info about this. To be honest, I think dropping the box sounds more work than you need... I could be wrong though.

Good luck!
 

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I thought I would comment on this in case others are worried/put off when they need to change the cables.

Mine snapped, and I managed to find a breaker who got me the whole gear stick and cable assembly unbroken.

Now I did already have the bolt out which was through the wheel arch because I left it out when doing the clutch full well knowing it would cause me a problem when I wanted the battery tray, but the whole job took me about 2 hours maximum.

Here are some tips for doing the job:

Popping the ball joints - use a thin wide crow bar and get some twist on it, they come off quite easy.

Removing the cables from the metal clips on top the box - these metal springs get tighter as you pull on them, so push the cable down, get a screw driver in and push the clip all the way in on one side, then get your hand round the back of the cable and rotate/wiggle it and pull up and it will come out in a few minutes.

Reverse cable - If this isn't broke, just take it out of the gear stick and then it will go through the rubber when you pull the gear stick assembly out, no need to make life harder for yourself.

Big rubber seal in bulk head - Now I could get this to move at all, and I figured the gear cables were already screwed, so I pulled the gear cables through until they were seated against the rubber block, one leg each side and pulled as hard as I could and it popped straight out. I then carefully threaded the reverse cable through as I pulled it out, making sure I didn't pull hard on it and snap it at the other end. When you put the new rubber block in push the reverse cable through before you start.

Sorry to go on (and sorry to bump a really old thread), but hopefully this will help somebody in the future.
 

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I thought I would comment on this in case others are worried/put off when they need to change the cables.

Mine snapped, and I managed to find a breaker who got me the whole gear stick and cable assembly unbroken.

Now I did already have the bolt out which was through the wheel arch because I left it out when doing the clutch full well knowing it would cause me a problem when I wanted the battery tray, but the whole job took me about 2 hours maximum.

Here are some tips for doing the job:

Popping the ball joints - use a thin wide crow bar and get some twist on it, they come off quite easy.

Removing the cables from the metal clips on top the box - these metal springs get tighter as you pull on them, so push the cable down, get a screw driver in and push the clip all the way in on one side, then get your hand round the back of the cable and rotate/wiggle it and pull up and it will come out in a few minutes.

Reverse cable - If this isn't broke, just take it out of the gear stick and then it will go through the rubber when you pull the gear stick assembly out, no need to make life harder for yourself.

Big rubber seal in bulk head - Now I could get this to move at all, and I figured the gear cables were already screwed, so I pulled the gear cables through until they were seated against the rubber block, one leg each side and pulled as hard as I could and it popped straight out. I then carefully threaded the reverse cable through as I pulled it out, making sure I didn't pull hard on it and snap it at the other end. When you put the new rubber block in push the reverse cable through before you start.

Sorry to go on (and sorry to bump a really old thread), but hopefully this will help somebody in the future.
Thanks for the info re the gear cable clips - I was feeling thwarted by these devilish little items, even with the Haynes manual. I also found a little WD40 helped the cable pop out. I had to modify the WD40 spout with a bit of cable sleeve to get it right on the spot.
 

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Well yes but it is a pain reading through a fault thinking its "live" only to find it is history and the originator is possibly no longer using the forum. Read them by all means but don't add is my message.
 

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Well yes but it is a pain reading through a fault thinking its "live" only to find it is history and the originator is possibly no longer using the forum. Read them by all means but don't add is my message.
Well, it was live for me, as I had been struggling with these clips. Four years old or not, I was grateful for the info, which I came across by googling in the search box, and I wanted to say thanks.
I'm knocking on a bit now, but have been DIY-ing my cars for the past near 50 years, but my Pug 307 HDi 2.0 is the first transverse engine motor I've owned, so it's quite a learning experience for me, and I'm very grateful for any info I can glean from this excellent forum, be it historic or today's news. :)
 
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