Peugeot Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

I'm looking for some advice or suggestions from people a little more knowledgable than me on a problem I have with my 307 2.0 HDi. This might go on a bit, but I'll try to explain....

So basically I bought the car as a non-runner, the original 110bhp RHS engine was still in the car but the head had been removed and I was told it seized due to 'oil starvation'. So what I did was remove the engine from my old 306 (90bhp RHY), swapped all the ancillaries and loom over from the original RHS engine and fitted that to the 307. It worked fine for around 60 miles, the developed an awful misfire whilst idling one morning as I was scraping ice from the windscreen. It didn't sound good, pretty terminal in fact so I sourced another RHS engine and fitted that (extreme I know, but I was never comfortable with installing the RHY engine in the first place, although the engine itself was strong, I've read that the 110bhp HDi has a burnished steel crankshaft and they must've installed that for a reason?!).

Anyway, the new engine was in within a day and all running fine. I had an idea that the old engine (the RHY) had suffered some sort of valve damage. I checked the timing (I actually did this before removing the engine), and it was fine. I then took the valve cover off only to discover a broken rocker arm on cylinder 2. I'm aware that they are designed to fail in the case of piston to valve contact through timing belt issues, but the engine seemed to time up fine with locking pins on the cam sprocket and flywheel.

So do these rocker arms fail no no apparent reason very often? Because I've got a feeling the new engine I put in (the new RHS) has done the same thing again, this time after about 350 miles. I've got a bad back at the moment, so haven't been able to check, but I've heard it running and it sounds uncannily similar.

Now the only thing I can think is the cambelt. I used the belt the came with the car, as it was brand new. I held it up to the old RHY belt and it seemed exactly the same length. The tensioner and idler were exactly the same also. I tensioned it up as per these instructions, as I always have on my HDi engines:-

The best way to tension the HDi belt (locking tools removed) is to put a 16mm spanner on the cam pulley and gently tap it to the left until the belt is tight on the injection pump side, then push the tensioner against the belt until you can just turn the tensioner pulley with your hand.

Turn the engine 2 turns and check it again.

If you can't move the pulley it's too tight, if the pulley turns easily, it's too slack.
But it timed up fine? I don't understand what could've gone wrong, i.e. the same thing twice, but the cambelt/engine timing is what I'm suspicious about for some reason, although I don't know why.

Any ideas anyone? Thanks for taking the time to read my (huge) post, hope it made sense :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Basically what I'm wondering is do HDI rockers have a habit of breaking WITHOUT piston -> valve contact? I'm aware they are designed to break upon a valve being pushed up by a piston, but does that in itself create an inherent weakness leading to random failure of the rockers?

I've searched, but all I keep coming across is cambelt/timing issues ruining rockers, nothing about them just failing.

Any advice/experience would be great :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
315 Posts
never heard of it.

You mention setting the tensioner, but did you do this with either cam or crank pulley loose (which depends on year and model) in the correct fashion?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for your reply dpmiller. I've been looking into the timing on 2.0 HDi's a little more, as I'm convinced this is where my problem lies.

As I understand it the earlier engines had a 'floating' cam pulley and fixed crank pulley. Whereas the newer engines (including mine) have a fixed cam pulley and a 'floating' crank pulley (it seems the key way for the woodruff key is a little wider than the woodruff key itself. I assume this then get's pinched up in position after the timing belt has been tension with the crank pulley for the aux belt? Mine was seized up solid, but I had to removed it due to a leaking crank seal on the timing end.

Does that all sound correct?
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top