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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

well after many times pondering weather to do this or not and with a few bits & pieces of info on here (which helped so thanks), decided to take the plunge.

First off the glow plugs / glow plugs on the 2.0 Hdi engines are locked at the back of the engine and it would have been easier if they had been located at the bottom of Loch Ness.

My Xsi had been having issues starting in cold weather and with a few diagnostic tests under the belt it was the fault of the glow plugs to replace.

I used my friends garage and gave one of his mechanics a hand. (just a little note).

There's absolutely no room to get your hand or even see down the back of the engine, so the top engine mount was removed along with releasing the bottom mount - then it was put on an axle stand to support the engine.

I then used a ratchet strap on to the right hand engine lift bracket and used the tow eye at the front to ratchet the engine forward - taking care. This pulled it more to the left than anything but still more space.

There's a breather pipe on the air filter that needs to be removed to get better access.

The scuttle panel needs to be removed along to give you more room.

Then working with a mirror / light and a few swear words the process was to remove the two centre plugs carefully (remember to make sure the engine is as warm as possible before hand - this will help with a tiny fraction of expansion if at all.

Remove the coolant pipe to the left of the EGR cooler and bend back and plug - you will get a bit of coolant lose but easier to do this way.

So remove the middle two taking care with tiny nuts. Then struggle like fcuk with the left hand one and using a mirror all the time to see what your doing.

I didn't bother with the right hand plug as this was in a nightmare place and would have taken an hour or so to remove the shite before you can actually get at the glow plug so at least with doing 3 - 75% is better than nowt.

So hope this helps and let me know if you have any questions as sure there's a lot of stuff I've missed but this is definitely a good start.

We did test the plugs afterwards - one by one when taking them out to see what they were like and 2 out of 3 were not too bad but i didn't check with a multimeter just a battery on the terminals and even though two did glow they were not the quickest at heating up.

so hope it helps. :lol:
 

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If your having starting issues i doubt changing glowplugs will help thats not what they are for :)

Glowplugs on these engines are used more for helping regeneration of the DPF They are not really for starting !
 

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Discussion Starter #3
although I agree that they are not solely used as a starting aid and help reduce emissions on startup etc and with the pressure of modern diesel fuel systems provide they do certainly require glow plugs to be able to preheat - even for a few seconds.

So true in some respects, I did start my car this morning and it was -2dec C without any problems unlike previous which took about 5 heating cycles then waiting to get any where near were it would start.

So without changing them i'd be in that same boat and it's not the battery or the start motor.

(but everything helps.)
 

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although I agree that they are not solely used as a starting aid and help reduce emissions on startup etc and with the pressure of modern diesel fuel systems provide they do certainly require glow plugs to be able to preheat - even for a few seconds.

So true in some respects, I did start my car this morning and it was -2dec C without any problems unlike previous which took about 5 heating cycles then waiting to get any where near were it would start.

So without changing them i'd be in that same boat and it's not the battery or the start motor.

(but everything helps.)
glow plugs are not needed to start until -20 if you dont believe any of us then unplug the glow plug relay and start the engine and see what happens.

if you are not going to accept anyone's advise then why ask for it in the first place?

how do you know its not the starter, battery or a bad connection (earth, battery, starter.....)?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
cheers for the advice.

-20deg C seems a bit low but this is just according to the stuff I've read and been told about - even from a mechanic at a peugeot dealers. But never mind, I'm more than happy to listen.

I have changed the battery to a bigger AMP which produces a higher speed crank turn over power or what ever it's called and also changed the starter motor to to a better one but all to no avail. As I'd rather try to go down the simple things rather than the plugs as I've heard the same about these engines and the use of the glow plugs can be secondary.

This would be the 2nd winter that I've struggled with this issue but after two cold mornings of minus temperatures the car has started perfectly ok were as i know this wouldn't have been the case if the glow plugs hadn't been changed.

So it may have been a coincidence and fixed a fault of a bad earth etc but it just seems to have worked so I wasn't looking for advice i was only posting what I thought would be useful.

More than happy for the feedback being good or bad.
 

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cheers for the advice.

-20deg C seems a bit low but this is just according to the stuff I've read and been told about - even from a mechanic at a peugeot dealers. But never mind, I'm more than happy to listen.

I have changed the battery to a bigger AMP which produces a higher speed crank turn over power or what ever it's called and also changed the starter motor to to a better one but all to no avail. As I'd rather try to go down the simple things rather than the plugs as I've heard the same about these engines and the use of the glow plugs can be secondary.

This would be the 2nd winter that I've struggled with this issue but after two cold mornings of minus temperatures the car has started perfectly ok were as i know this wouldn't have been the case if the glow plugs hadn't been changed.

So it may have been a coincidence and fixed a fault of a bad earth etc but it just seems to have worked so I wasn't looking for advice i was only posting what I thought would be useful.

More than happy for the feedback being good or bad.
glowplug relay sticking on would have less current available for the starter as the glowplugs would be using some current
 

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Discussion Starter #7
many thanks for that I'll get it checked out just in case it's been a fluke and a bit of coincidence.

:)
 

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Just going to throw my 2 pence worth in for good measure....

I've been having cold start issues with my Megane 1.5dci, anything less than 2deg Celsius and the engine hesitates slightly when it's turning over.

I then remembered that, some distant time in the past before becoming a dad for the first time and when I slept for more than 2 hours a night, I used to turn the car electrics on (2nd key position) so the glow plugs would go through the preheating phase, and repeat this a few times depending on how cold it is outside.

So, this morning it was -1, I put the glow plugs through a couple of preheating phases by turning the leccy on in the car, and it started up almost instantly.

So, IMHO, glow plugs are NOT ESSENTIAL to start a modern diesel engine - they will start up happily without the preheating.

However, they are there for a reason and on frosty mornings, using them in the right way can help get the engine going when otherwise it may not.
 
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