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Hi I am looking for some advice, I have a 307 2.0 hdi 136! I have been told it could be from the injectors? Any one had this happen to them and know how much it would cost to fix or if the diesel could be getting into the oil a different way?

Cheers
 

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Yea, injectors would be the reasonable place to start.

It is probably the only place this can happen as well, but there are other possibilities and I dont know the engine intimately enough to know them if they exist.
 
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Hi, I've been thinking about this...

How did this get diagnosed?

There will be a certain amount of diesel in the oil, as when you crank the engine over when the engine is cold - there will be no oil in the cylinders at that moment so fuel ( petrol or diesel ) can escape down the cylinders behind the piston rings as there will be no oil barrier.

This would only be a minute amount though, unless you do lots of on/off driving...

I'm not sure what other route fuel would take to get to the oil :confused:
 

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They had someone look at it and they checked the dipstick and it was above max and stank of diesel apparently! Also had an oil change and got told there was diesel getting into the oil!
 
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I'm not a mechanic - but I'm scratching my head ( must get some more Head and Shoulders... ) as the route for the diesel to go.

Injectors are a possibility I guess, they are a bit tricky to remove on the 2.0Hdi as there is a silly cantilever type retaining lever which can be tricky.

I have been quoted £20 per injector to get it cleaned, and the cleaning company can remove, clean and refit the injectors on site with an hourly labour charge. I haven't used them yet though so I can't comment on the end result.
 

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Ok thanks for your comments, if you know/ can suggest anything else I would be very greatful
 

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Don't know this engine but I've known seals passing on the high pressure fuel pump which results in diesel contaminating the oil. If injectors were piddling or leaking this would normally result in black smoke. The only other way I've seen diesel in oil was on the Leyland engines when the dribble rail was located under the rocker covers, something your engine can't suffer with fortunately.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
No black smoke and the car doesn't lack in power either! Some times it takes a bit longer to start!
 

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Diesel In Oil

Hi, I had same problem last year with 2005 hdi 1.6. DPF blocked, had mine removed and re-map, no more problems.
 

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DPF does NOT cause this lack of regen of the DPF COULD but you would have other symptoms if your DPF was blocked/not regenerating

Leaking injectors could be the cause leaking injector pump can also cause it either of those will cause diesel to end up in the sump.

Injectors can leak when stopped leaking off the fuel pressure filling the bowl in 1 piston then running down the bores into the sump this could also cause poor starting first thing.
 

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DPF does NOT cause this lack of regen of the DPF COULD but you would have other symptoms if your DPF was blocked/not regenerating

Leaking injectors could be the cause leaking injector pump can also cause it either of those will cause diesel to end up in the sump.

Injectors can leak when stopped leaking off the fuel pressure filling the bowl in 1 piston then running down the bores into the sump this could also cause poor starting first thing.
Just a question as I don't know the answer, does the pressure remain in the fuel system, hp pump to injector, when the engine is stopped or does it return back to the tank ? I remember on cummins engines fitted with common rail that when you removed the injector feed pipes the pressure had dropped as soon as you stopped the engine, admittedly these were mechanical injectors not electronic.
 

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Be interested to know what fuel system Cummins used as I have never come accross a common rail system with mechanical injectors before. There is , however , more than one type of high pressure diesel injection system.
 

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Going back many years to the cummins V8 and straight 6 which both had common rail manual injectors. All engineering staff , including myself, were sent on a course at Cummins Daventry based on adjusting injection rates using a dial gauge. To be honest we found it easier to send the vehicle to the local cummins agent for this type of work. The fuel system was known as the, if I remember correctly, PT system where you had a high pressure pump feeding all the push rod controlled injectors., no electronic injectors in those days 1967 to 1980 onwards.
 

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Most of the vehicles where injectors leak into oil are unit injectors and or enclosed with cam box or similar. I would be looking at the HP pump as it is a 136 and the pump is bolted to end of head and cam driven so there must be chance if shaft seals have gone diesel could leak into head
 

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Going back many years to the cummins V8 and straight 6 which both had common rail manual injectors. All engineering staff , including myself, were sent on a course at Cummins Daventry based on adjusting injection rates using a dial gauge. To be honest we found it easier to send the vehicle to the local cummins agent for this type of work. The fuel system was known as the, if I remember correctly, PT system where you had a high pressure pump feeding all the push rod controlled injectors., no electronic injectors in those days 1967 to 1980 onwards.
Many thanks Nick, interesting system obviously revolutionary in its time particularly when introduced. Can see why I haven't come accross it before as it is peculiar to Cummins and my commercial experience is really with Volvo and Scania. No it is different from what we think of as common rail injection today. In modern common rail the rail is held under extremely high pressure, sometimes in excess of 1000 bar, the rail also doubles as an accumulator and injectors are electronically controlled. As far as I am aware the rail doesn't intentionally depressurise so faulty injectors can leak diesel into the cylinder. The article I read said that the PT system still exists in part but is now computer controlled and I wonder if it is used in the cummins QSK series engines that are widely used accross the rail network.
 
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