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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all and glad to be part of the forum! A friend has a 307sw with a 1.6 diesel engine. The car lost power and ground to a halt shortly after the oil light came on!! On closer examination the oil filter was solid with black sludge blocking circulation of oil. Apparently it was serviced 15000 miles ago. Has any one experienced this before as before I start stripping and re building I need to know why the filter has blocked up. Many Thanks, Stuart.
 

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I've heard of this happening also on a 407 1.6 hdi due to running past its service interval...:rolleyes:
The service intervals for these are 12,000mls but i normally change mine
at 9,000 mls and use fully syn mobil 1esp which is dpf friendly...:)

Using the correct oil on these engines are critical and keeping well within the
service intervals....Also an engine flush is also recommended every so often.
Ron.
 

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There's a snappy new moniker for Black Death now, and it's called sludge. The cause is the same as Black Death and it seems to be regardless of maintenance or mileage. The chemical compounds in engine oils break down over time due to prolonged exposure to high temperatures and poor maintenance habits. When the oil oxidises, the additives separate from the oil and begin to chemically break down and solidify, leading to the baked-on oil deposits turning gelatinous, and that nasty compound is what is lovingly referred to nowadays as sludge. It's like black yoghurt. What doesn't help is that modern engines, due to packaging, have smaller sumps than in the "good old days" and so hold less oil. This means that the oil that is present in the engine can't hold as much crap (for want of a better word) and can lead to earlier chemical breakdown.
The most common factor in sludge buildup is mineral oils combined with a lack of maintenance by the car owner combined with harsh driving conditions. But this isn't true in all cases. For some reason, a 2005 Consumer Reports article discovered that some engines from Audi, Chrysler, Saab, Toyota, and Volkswagen appear prone to sludge almost no matter how often the oil is changed.
Curing sludge
There are no hard and fast rules for curing an engine of sludge buildup. If it's really bad, flushing the engine might be the only cure, but that could also cause even more problems. If flushing the engine results in bits of sludge getting lodged where they can do more damage, you're actually worse off.
It's interesting to note that some race techs have reported sludge buildup in race engines as a result of aftermarket additives being used in conjunction with the regular oil. The chemical composition of the additives isn't as neutral as some companies would lead us to believe, and combined with particular types of oil and high-stress driving, they can cause oil breakdown and sludge to appear. The lesson from them appears to be "don't use additives".

http://www.carbibles.com/engineoil_bible.html#blackdeath
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Risky and Betty, Thanks for your replies, I think I'll try flushing the engine and then see if the undoubted damage is terminal. The hose from the intercooler apparently collapses when revving the engine, so it might be a case of ruuning it disconnected! Again, many thanks, I'll keep you informed! Stu.
 
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