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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, all. Have owned an '11 plate 2.0HDI for three years with no issues. Serviced by a main dealer.
Two days ago my wife went to start the car and for the engine symbol with 'engine fault, repair needed' came on.
The car has no nasty noises or any indication of an issue other than a lack of turbo power. The turbo is still working as the boost pipe bulges a little as it tries to power up.
It drives like a normally aspirated 2.0.
Ran a diagnostic over the system and got codes: P2141 and P0488. Having a hard time nailing down what is happening, am used to working on much simpler vehicles. The only odd thing is this. Turn the engine off and walk round to the open bonnetted engine and stand a few seconds. After all the whirrs and clicks there is a hissing noise that lasts about two seconds, right at the front of the engine, like holding a bike tyre valve in. Not sure whether it is blowing or sucking air.
Google is just the gift that keeps giving on answers why the codes are there.
Any help much appreciated, guys.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
So not having any help offered I did some detailed investigation. With some pointers from knowledgeable guys at work (Bentley) I came up with the root cause.
For anyone who finds this thread I hope the following helps.
I had an engine warning light which said 'engine fault, repair needed'.
With the bonnet up turn off the engine and walk to stand in front of the engine bay. After the usual series of whirrs and clicking, you will hear a short hissing sound coming from the front of the engine. To the right of centre if you look down between the pipes you will see the wastegate. It has a metal rod going upwards, plenty of pictures on Google if you're not sure. Coming out of the side is the vacuum tube. It curves out of the housing and is a thick, black rubber curve of tubing about two inches long. After that it is a thin heat-shielded pipe that goes up and curves left over the engine.
Gently pull the hose from the wastegate. Mine was spongy and had no grip on the spigot it was pushed onto. The internal diameter when measured was over 5mm. I believe, from the fact I used this size and it sealed well, should have been 4.7mm internal diameter.
If like mine the original connecting hose was spongy along its length, you will have to gently pull it free from the rigid pipe and replace it as a whole. You want an equally thick replacement as, I believe, the thickness aids rigidity against the vacuum pressure needed to operate the wastegate.
Once fitted you will need an OBD scanner to check and clear the codes above. It may come back in the first drive, but clearing them again will be permanent then. My guess is that the system takes time to level out and balance.
This is a cheap starting point to help with a cure for any turbo related issue.
I hope this all helps someone. Good luck.
 

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This is what forums are all about, helping others and that's just what you have done here so well done and thank you for the information.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Update. Still got the 488 code and no turbo boost. Now the internet will
Tell you all sorts. The problem on mine was very simple to cure, but hard to find as the information had me looking all over the system.
And it was quite well hidden. We go back to the wastegate Once more. Hidden behind all the parts at the front of the engine, you can only partially see the right hand side of it. Coming out of the top is a slim plastic rod with a hole in the top. Of you pass your hand behind the parts obscuring the wastegate you can feel what you are doing. Find the top of the rod and feel in the space above. You will find another activating rod at a right angle to the wastegate rod. Slide the latter over the end of the upper rod.
Now, I couldn't find how this was secured, no slot for a C clip or such. So, my solution is this. Take a wide zip tie and bring it round the bracket that the wastegate sits on and gently zip tie it in place. Leave enough slack for it to move up and down. There is no structural strength needed to hold it in place, it just needs stopping from sliding off the actuator rod.
Have left it this long to prove my fix works. I have full turbo back and no error codes at all. Also on the reader the I/M now says yes, as opposed to no when it has the codes. Hope this helps. Will try and add a photo or two to help.
 

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Hi Curver,

Just found your post from a few years back about the P0488 issue you had with your Peugeot.
Just wondering if the tube you are talking about in your post is the 1 coming off the throttle body?
Ive had my EGR and throttle body off in the last few months and the only issue i can see is the waste gate on the throttle body is loose and creates no vacuum.

Funny enough I work at Bentley too and is what has drawn me to your post!
Any help would be great.

Matt
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi Curver,

Just found your post from a few years back about the P0488 issue you had with your Peugeot.
Just wondering if the tube you are talking about in your post is the 1 coming off the throttle body?
Ive had my EGR and throttle body off in the last few months and the only issue i can see is the waste gate on the throttle body is loose and creates no vacuum.

Funny enough I work at Bentley too and is what has drawn me to your post!
Any help would be great.

Matt
Small world, mate. The second post was my cure. Between the plastic that curves off the front of the engine, once the cover has been removed. You can see it looking down the right side and under. Not had an EGR fault on my 3008, so not needed to hunt it down, but it's crammed at the bulkhead side. That was where the original Internet answers wanted me to go.
 
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