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Hi all, I'm new to this so bare with me.

I'm looking at buying a Peugeot 207 1.6 HDI GT 110.

I've seen reviews saying this engine is a pile of s**t as it has issues with carbon build up which I believe causes oil starvation to the turbo and messes up the turbo. Correct me if I'm wrong?

However, I understand that these HDI engines were made by Ford and the PSA group and these engines were put in cars such as the Ford, Citroen, Peugeot, Mini Cooper etc and looking at the reviews, they arnt so bad? I saw a few issues with turbos etc but it seems like it's the 207's HDI engines that seem to be the worst? Why? Is it because the 110 HDI engine has an inter cooler and the 90 HDI engine doesn't?

To cut a long story short, I've taken 'a shine' to the 207 GT HDI 110 and I love it. However, things about the HDI 110 engine don't sound too good??

Is there a way of avoiding problems with the HDI engine? I believe that flushing the engine and regular servicing is recommended but does it help? Calling on all HDI owners to please help me out. Like I said, I'm in love with the 207 but not sure what to do? Honest opinions, please!

Many thanks:lol::lol:
 

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Oh, and also..I've considered the petrol engines too, which I believe Peugeot made with BMW? Thoughts on those VTI/THP engines aswell please? Any recommendations and opinions are needed. Not sure what engine to go for, thanks again!:lol::nod::)
 

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Peugeots are not the only cars that get many internet reports of carbon build up and blown turbos. If you trawl the forums for most makes of cars you will read many tales of woe.

A strict service routine which includes regular oil changes at shorter intervals than the recommended interval using a good quality oil of the correct grade is required to prevent carbon build up which gets into the oil and blocks the turbo feed pipe.

I believe that the petrol engine built in conjunction with BMW has had an issue with the timing chain. I think I've read there is a modified tensioner which resolves this issue. I don't know if this is correct as I haven't had a petrol engined car for longer than I care to remember, but someone will no doubt correct me if I'm wrong.
 

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Yeah, I guess so! But then you hear about other diesels like VAG group etc which Diesel engines don't have the same problem? Obviously they're different engines but even a thorough service and the correct oil etc might not be able to stop bad carbon build up, surely?
 

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I've seen reviews saying this engine is a pile of s**t as it has issues with carbon build up which I believe causes oil starvation to the turbo and messes up the turbo. Correct me if I'm wrong?
Yes and No. Storeman has answered it, but I think the problem is Peugeot's recommendation of 20,000 miles between oil changes. When I did a bit of research some time ago for other makes which also had the same engine, their service intervals were 16,000 and less.

Peugeot don't care because the car is out of warranty by that time, and the marque gets the blame for having poor build quality, writing off all those years of quality and reliability that the 306 and 406 built up. But I guess Peugeot don't want people driving reliable cars because it doesn't bring them any money in, and in today's throwaway society its becoming more acceptable to just throw things away when they break.

I also have a suspicion that third party garages may have used the wrong oil, not knowing how important the right viscosity low-ash oil is for the DPF, probably using their generic drum.

If you're looking at a 207, make sure the service history is spot on, and that any recalls and issues have been dealt with. Browsing the 207 section should pre-arm you with all the niggles these cars have.
 

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I have been a member of a few car forums and have read stories about Vauxhalls and Renaults blowing turbos due to incorrect grade oil and / or leaving the oil change for too long. The only reason these two spring to mind is that I was researching models from both manufacturers before buying cars. I bought a high mileage Astra and later on a high mileage Laguna, both 10 years old when I bought them. I had read many posts complaining that the turbos had blown for both cars but also read many posts saying exactly the same as I posted earlier. I also worked with a guy who had a Vectra and had the turbo replaced after about two years with 90,000iles on the clock. I have also read posts of blown turbos on Honda, Subaru & Lexus cars though not as many as I've only read a fraction of the post on those forums. Got to say I'm not surprised to read about blown turbo's on Subarus though.

I did regular oil changes at less than 10,000 mile intervals covering 600 - 700 miles per week and never had any issues with the turbo on either car. I carried the early oil change onto both my high mileage 307's and didn't have any turbo issues, even on the 1.6L HDI.

All my cars prior to the 308 were between 8 & 10 years old and had over 100,000 miles when I bought them and regular servicing kept the engines and turbos running sweetly.

Yes, the 1.6 HDi engine has many stories about coking up and blowing the turbo but for every one person that has reported this happening there are several more who haven't posted that their engine/turbo has run fine without the turbo problem. Most people only bother to report problems but don't bother when there is no problem to mention. You asked the question which was answered. If you are so sure this will happen to the car you are looking at then leave it where it is and look at the 2.0L engine. You will still find reports of blown turbos on the 2.0 though nowhere near as many as the 1.6

Finally, a turbo is a piece precision engineering and has a finite life. It will fail eventually due to the laws of physics. I've read that the expected life of a turbo is around 120,000 miles but know of turbos that are still going with over 200,000 miles covered.
 

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One of the issues is also people not checking the oil and keeping it topped up there is not much oil in sump and it has a hard life. Running the car with the oil level a bit low causes it to be hotter and more likely for the carbon suspended in the oil to solidify and start blocking oil ways and turbo feed pipe filter
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks lads!

The 207 GT 110 HDI that I'm looking at has 81,000 on the clock and it has already had its turbo changed once. It has been serviced on average every 18,000-25,000 miles. Thoughts?
 

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Also, would any of you recommended a regular engine flush to reduce the carbon build-up issues? And as for oil, what oil would you recommend for the 1.6 HDI engine?:thumb::cool:
 

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Thanks lads!

The 207 GT 110 HDI that I'm looking at has 81,000 on the clock and it has already had its turbo changed once. It has been serviced on average every 18,000-25,000 miles. Thoughts?
I'd want to know why the turbo has been changed. David Ireland (a prominent former member) always warned that if the engine has eaten one, it will eat another.

Have a read of this case study:

http://nwex.co.uk/pugdiag/1.6-hdi-carbo-issues.pdf
 

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As stated already the turbos only blew from long oil changes, ford for example use the same engine and had the oil change at 10k miles where Peugeot gradually reduced theirs from 20k to what it is now, 12k. Generally a second turbo went if the process for cleaning the system wasbt followed properly, changing the oil feed pipe where the gauze filter blocks and cleaning the sump.

This is the only real common issue with the engine, but of services have been regular and the correct oil has been used they will be fine.

The difference between the 90 and 110 models is just the turbo and injectors are different, and the pre ~2010 90 models do not have a dpf. Both are intercooled.
 

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So basically, thorough services at every 10,000 miles and the changing of the oil feed pipe where the gauze filter blocks and the sump should not cause the excessive carbon buildup that reportedly occurs and will also not starve oil to the turbo? If so, that's great! Thanks for all the advice etc:thumb::cool:
 

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Looking at that case study posted above, am I right in saying that regular servicing (every 10,000 miles), the replacement of various components such as oil lines, filters etc, should prevent excessive carbon buildup which results in engine issues (like performance and fuel economy issues etc) and lack of oil lubrication to the turbo? Confused. Can the carbon buildup issues be eliminated or not? I've heard a lot of the trouble is the fact that these HDI engines are 'direct injection' engines?....:confused::nono::confused:
 

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As I understand it, the oil feed pipes only need replacing at the time the turbo is replaced. If the oil is changed regularly at 10k with the correct grade oil then they shouldn't need replacing again. They only need replacing if a long oil change regime is used and the oil collects carbon deposits again.

Many posts have reported that the replacement oil feed pipe for the turbo does not have the gauze filter which gets clogged up with carbon deposits which is the cause of turbo oil starvation and so decreases the likelihood of a turbo failure recurrence. The chances of it requiring a second replacement turbo all depends on how good a job was carried out cleaning the engine when the turbo was replaced.
 

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Yes regular oil changes will prevent it from happening, wouldn't do any more than 10k between if I were you. The fact it is direct injection doesn't really have any bearing on the turbo problem, majority of newer diesel engines are direct injection now
 

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Yes regular oil changes will prevent it from happening, wouldn't do any more than 10k between if I were you. The fact it is direct injection doesn't really have any bearing on the turbo problem, majority of newer diesel engines are direct injection now
Thanks, yeah I guess so. It's just that you see so much about carbon build up issues on these HDI engines..especially the engine in the case study that was posted in this thread... Not sure if purchasing a 207 1.6 HDI is a good idea? Still undecided! Sounds like a lot of maintenance? But then again, if all it takes is a regular service at 10,000 miles then it seems too easy to be true. For example, If I bought a car with 100,000 miles on it, and it was serviced every 20k, this would show the car has travelled a lot of mileage and hasn't been serviced as regularly as it should of. What would be the first thing any of you would do in order to clear out the carbon in the engine? Assuming, in this situation, there is bound to be quite a large amount of carbon deposits lurking in the engine.. Would you recommend an engine flush or service the car and hope that with a service, the carbon deposits clear?... Thoughts?...:confused::D
 
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