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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All

I'm suffering some major clutch judder in 1st and reverse and suspect the DMF is on it's way out. Car is a 2008 207 1.6 HDi DV6TED4.

I'm considering the possibility of changing the DMF and clutch and wondered if anyone has some advice they could share:

Apparently Valeo tell me that there is a solid flywheel conversion kit for the 1.6 HDI (VALEO part number: 835071)
Should I stick with the DMF or go for the Solid Conversion????

Anyone know of any guide on the correct way to get the gearbox out or have you done one yourself?

Thanks in advance, Chris
 

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I would suggest getting a Haynes manual if one is available. Helped me out no end when I did the clutch on a 307.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I would suggest getting a Haynes manual if one is available. Helped me out no end when I did the clutch on a 307.
Hi Storeman

Haynes manual is on my list if all else fails. Was hoping someone would have a real life experience to share and how much of a job it is. Also looking for anyone who's done the solid flywheel conversion and if it's worth doing?

Cheers, Chris
 

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Did my first clutch replacement for over 30 years about 18 months ago on a 2.0L 307 HDi. Mr Haynes was my only guide along with my experience from many years ago and my experiences from repairing all kinds of machinery through the years.

It can easily be done in a day IF you have a pit or a ramp and all the right tools. It is still possible to complete in a day without the ramps / pit but make sure you have all the right tools and all parts. It took me nearly two days as I started late on a Sunday and by the time all the stores had closed I realised I needed a couple of tools and also that I had forgotten to get new drive shaft seals.

I did mine on the road outside my house and had the front end up on axle stands, I was using a small trolley jack to support and manouvre the gearbox when removing it and was using a bottle jack to support the engine (with suitable pieces of timber to prevent damaging the sump).

Not all clutch changes will be the same. Some will have sensors that need disconnecting where others don't.

I decided to remove the drive shafts and hubs as a single unit which was were I deviated from the way shown in the Haynes manual and by most people who would take the job on themselves but I had my reasons.

This is how I did the 307

Drain the gearbox & refit drain plug when completely drained.

Remove the driveshafts in whichever way suits you best. The drivers side has an intermediate bearing at the rear engine mount so the bolts that hold the bearing in the carrier need to be removed.

It is recommended to remove the exhaust to prevent damage to the flexi pipe but I just slackened the clamp as I couldn't remove it completely because of the limited space iI had.

Remove the battery & Battery box to gain access to the mount on the gearbox

If necessary, remove the air filter housing and any ducting that goes over the gearbox

Remove the starter motor

Detach the clutch slave cylinder, there is no need to remove the hydraulic pipe.

Detach the gearchange cables and support bracket from the gearbox

Note positions and remove all cables from the gearbox (crank sensor etc)

If fitted, remove the lower fluwheel cover plate.

If the car has one, remove the lower gearbox / engine support bracket. (This is a pig to get off and even harder to refit. Mine is still in a box in the shed.)

Support the engine with a jack & a block of wood.

Place a jack underneath the gearbox and raise it to support the weight.

Slacken & remove the centre nut from the mounting then indo all the mounting nuts to remove the mounting.

Remove the mounting bracket from the body

If it is a BE4/5 gearbox remove the spacer then unscrew the stud. (I had to use heat from a blowlamp to remove on mine). These have threadlocker on them so are very tight.

Remove the rear engin/transmission mounting from the subframe.

Remove all bolts holding the gearbox to the engine - One bolt went in from the engine to the gearbox - all the others went from the gearbox into the engine.

Make a final check that everything has been disconnected and clear then slowly lower the gearbox while pulling it away from the engine.

When finally clear lower completely and wrestle it out from under the car.

Replace the clutch & flywheel if necessary and refit every thing in reverse order.

Hardest part of getting it back for me was the initial lifting the gearbox off the ground & on to the trolley jack. The gearbox slid in easily and once held in with a couple of bolts was quite simple to bolt it all together.

As for whether you should go the route of solid conversion, I will not advise one way or another. Some say it is fine while others say that the standard clutch plate cannot withstand the torque being applied. For that you need to do your own research and make an informed decision based on the information you find.
 

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Hi All

I'm suffering some major clutch judder in 1st and reverse and suspect the DMF is on it's way out. Car is a 2008 207 1.6 HDi DV6TED4.
Is it the 90 bhp or 110 bhp model? They both had these engines but if it's the 90 bhp then it doesn't have a DMF, it already has a solid flywheel.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Did my first clutch replacement for over 30 years about 18 months ago on a 2.0L 307 HDi. Mr Haynes was my only guide along with my experience from many years ago and my experiences from repairing all kinds of machinery through the years.

It can easily be done in a day IF you have a pit or a ramp and all the right tools. It is still possible to complete in a day without the ramps / pit but make sure you have all the right tools and all parts. It took me nearly two days as I started late on a Sunday and by the time all the stores had closed I realised I needed a couple of tools and also that I had forgotten to get new drive shaft seals.

I did mine on the road outside my house and had the front end up on axle stands, I was using a small trolley jack to support and manouvre the gearbox when removing it and was using a bottle jack to support the engine (with suitable pieces of timber to prevent damaging the sump).

Not all clutch changes will be the same. Some will have sensors that need disconnecting where others don't.

I decided to remove the drive shafts and hubs as a single unit which was were I deviated from the way shown in the Haynes manual and by most people who would take the job on themselves but I had my reasons.

This is how I did the 307

Drain the gearbox & refit drain plug when completely drained.

Remove the driveshafts in whichever way suits you best. The drivers side has an intermediate bearing at the rear engine mount so the bolts that hold the bearing in the carrier need to be removed.

It is recommended to remove the exhaust to prevent damage to the flexi pipe but I just slackened the clamp as I couldn't remove it completely because of the limited space iI had.

Remove the battery & Battery box to gain access to the mount on the gearbox

If necessary, remove the air filter housing and any ducting that goes over the gearbox

Remove the starter motor

Detach the clutch slave cylinder, there is no need to remove the hydraulic pipe.

Detach the gearchange cables and support bracket from the gearbox

Note positions and remove all cables from the gearbox (crank sensor etc)

If fitted, remove the lower fluwheel cover plate.

If the car has one, remove the lower gearbox / engine support bracket. (This is a pig to get off and even harder to refit. Mine is still in a box in the shed.)

Support the engine with a jack & a block of wood.

Place a jack underneath the gearbox and raise it to support the weight.

Slacken & remove the centre nut from the mounting then indo all the mounting nuts to remove the mounting.

Remove the mounting bracket from the body

If it is a BE4/5 gearbox remove the spacer then unscrew the stud. (I had to use heat from a blowlamp to remove on mine). These have threadlocker on them so are very tight.

Remove the rear engin/transmission mounting from the subframe.

Remove all bolts holding the gearbox to the engine - One bolt went in from the engine to the gearbox - all the others went from the gearbox into the engine.

Make a final check that everything has been disconnected and clear then slowly lower the gearbox while pulling it away from the engine.

When finally clear lower completely and wrestle it out from under the car.

Replace the clutch & flywheel if necessary and refit every thing in reverse order.

Hardest part of getting it back for me was the initial lifting the gearbox off the ground & on to the trolley jack. The gearbox slid in easily and once held in with a couple of bolts was quite simple to bolt it all together.

As for whether you should go the route of solid conversion, I will not advise one way or another. Some say it is fine while others say that the standard clutch plate cannot withstand the torque being applied. For that you need to do your own research and make an informed decision based on the information you find.
Cheers for that storeman, although the 2.0l may be different it's a starter and I may just get the Haynes manual as well just to be certain.
I'm more thna capable of doing the job but just don't want to miss anything and make the job harder for myself.

I think there are some mixed oppinions on teh solid flywheel, some say it's perfect and some not but I'm keeping the car for a while so may go for it as don't want another dmf failure later down the line.

Cheers, Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Is it the 90 bhp or 110 bhp model? They both had these engines but if it's the 90 bhp then it doesn't have a DMF, it already has a solid flywheel.
Mine is the 110 version with the DMF sad to say. Wish I'd got the 90 now what with the DMF and DPF issues :(
 
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