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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I understand the 2020 3008 Hybrid4 has a B mode which offers true one foot driving?
If so, how do I switch to that mode?
 

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Just pull the gear lever back to switch to B and again to switch back to D.
It’s overrated though, yes it works if that’s what you want but you still need to use the foot brake to go from 5mph to a complete stop and if you generally use the foot brake to slow the car, you still get the regenerative braking benefit with no wear on the brake pads (except in heavy braking but that applies to one foot driving too).
I only use B mode when I genuinely need to slow the car, eg traffic lights, or to hold it back driving down a steep hill to prevent over speeding. It’s much more economical (about 5 times more economical) to let the car coast whenever possible.
Oh, and when the battery is full or nearly so, there’s no regenerative braking at all as there’s nowhere for the energy to go in which case you need to use the foot brake anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I’ve just come from a DS5 Hybrid4 which had regen permanently on. I’ve gotten so used to it that I’m keen to stick to it. The 3008 Hybrid4 is a stonking car and I love it. Now I know how to get back the regen that I’m used to, I’ll love it even more.

in reference to your point about coasting being 5 times more economical. Do you have data to back this up? I’m not being antagonistic…I just like to learn and educate myself 😀
 

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I’ve just come from a DS5 Hybrid4 which had regen permanently on. I’ve gotten so used to it that I’m keen to stick to it. The 3008 Hybrid4 is a stonking car and I love it. Now I know how to get back the regen that I’m used to, I’ll love it even more.

in reference to your point about coasting being 5 times more economical. Do you have data to back this up? I’m not being antagonistic…I just like to learn and educate myself 😀
Probably didn’t make myself clear. Regenerative braking will work whether in D or B mode if using the foot brake. Only in B mode can one foot braking be used. Also, in my 3008, the brake lights only come on when I press the foot brake so just using B to brake will not warn following vehicles that I am slowing (a design flaw in my opinion).
With regard to coasting v regen, first, I should have said ‘efficient” as opposed to “economical”. If you do an internet search, there are many articles explaining how regen works giving various examples of how efficient it is.
For example the one below says that heavy regenerative braking is only 16% efficient but gentle braking can be up to 70% efficient. By extension, coasting is more efficient still.
But in the simplest terms, the longer you take to slow down, the more efficient the process is because less energy is wasted converting it from one form to another. And coasting to a halt loses the least energy.

 

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Oh, and when the battery is full or nearly so, there’s no regenerative braking at all as there’s nowhere for the energy to go in which case you need to use the foot brake anyway.
Just means its a cheap poorly designed traction system.

The world of electric forklifts solved this regen braking issue 25+ years ago.
 

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Just means its a cheap poorly designed traction system.
You’ll find the same will apply to all commercially produced electric cars, including Outlander PHEV and Teslas.

This isn’t poor design, it physics!
 

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You’ll find the same will apply to all commercially produced electric cars, including Outlander PHEV and Teslas.

This isn’t poor design, it physics!
Its poor design, a contactor & resistor of the correct specifications would work perfectly when the battery is unable to take any more of the regen braking energy.
 

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Its poor design, a contactor & resistor of the correct specifications would work perfectly when the battery is unable to take any more of the regen braking energy.
Theory but not so practical. You know how hot brakes can get in a hard stop. And they have effective cooling, being at the extremities of the car, carefully designed airflow, disc and alloy heat sink (wheel) spinning in the air. Where are you going to place the resistor to dissipate this amount of heat? Modern car systems have evolved over a 120 years. The transformation to electric still has a lot of evolving to do.
 

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Theory but not so practical. You know how hot brakes can get in a hard stop. And they have effective cooling, being at the extremities of the car, carefully designed airflow, disc and alloy heat sink (wheel) spinning in the air. Where are you going to place the resistor to dissipate this amount of heat? Modern car systems have evolved over a 120 years. The transformation to electric still has a lot of evolving to do.
I agree, these are very early days for EVs. I want lots of folk to buy them now so evolution comes quickly before I buy one :cool: .
 
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