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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, I've been absent from the forums for some time humble apologie

I've just noticed recently A small puff of grey/blue smoke from the exhaust when I pull away after idling in traffic for long periods; doesn't seem to do it all the time.
Engine has only done 51k miles genuine, and has always been meticulously serviced with regular oil changes. Surely this can't be worn valve guides or worn valve guides oil seals ? what these signs suggest to me.

I know that theese EP6 Prince engines have their problems, but not valve guide wear. Other wise car seems to drive ok. I've had it 3 years now, absolutely love it and drive it very carefully.

Any thoughts or opinions most welcome, any thing to worry about or not?
 

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More likely the poor PCV system on the engine re breathing oil mist at idle

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The diaphragm in the PCV does fail on these however Peugeot only sell the complete cam cover and not the diaphragm on it's own.

There is a aftermarket one available I did post a link on a similar thread if you do a search

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Discussion Starter #6
I would try driving it a little harder to start, could be a build up of gunk in the inlet manifold.
Thanks for the reply stripe88. I could give that a go, only problem living on the Isle of Wight, most roads are full of traffic and pretty much 30/40 limits. We do have one stretch of dual carriageway about a mile long; Big Deal.
Maybe go out late at night when the roads are quite and give it a blast. Then get stopped by the police who will discover an embarrassed 70 year old boy racer with the lame excuse of trying to clean his inlet manifold. 'Not heard that one before sir', says Plod.

Any way thanks again, worth a try before taking things to pieces and spending loads of dosh
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The diaphragm in the PCV does fail on these however Peugeot only sell the complete cam cover and not the diaphragm on it's own.

There is a aftermarket one available I did post a link on a similar thread if you do a search

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Thanks again windy for taking the trouble to reply again, yes I have since done a search on the Forums (which I should of course have done in the first place).
Seems there is an aftermarket PCV refurb Kit available on Ebay, priced in dollars so presumably from USA.
I think your diagnoses must be correct as the car only smokes when pulling away from Idle. Of course now I've noticed it, I'm constantly looking in the mirror every time pull away for that tell tale puff of smoke, a little O.C.D.

I did take the small plastic access panel off of the cam cover assembly
to reveal PCV which is just to the right of the breather hose. I was hoping to be able to see if the diaphram was faulty. Unfortunately the covering cap seemed a very secure fit and I didn't want to damage it by forcing it off.
So will investigate further another day.

These Modern Engines with all there emission control systems and sensors are quite complex compared to my era of carburetters, distributers and crankcase breathers which vented staight to the atmosphere!

Anyway I've rambled on for far too long now, so thanks so much again for your advice
 

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that pipe can be a little awkward if it hasnt been removed in a long time, i got help, i squezed the pipe clip top and bottom with some full size long nose pliers and got a mate to jiggle it free with some pliers, you can then at least check how oil filled the pipe is.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
that pipe can be a little awkward if it hasnt been removed in a long time, i got help, i squezed the pipe clip top and bottom with some full size long nose pliers and got a mate to jiggle it free with some pliers, you can then at least check how oil filled the pipe is.
Yes I managed to get the breather pipe off with some off-set long nose pliers. It was the cap or cover plate above the PCV valve that I could not remove without fear of breaking it, in order to check condition of diaphragm underneath. Not sure it's designed to be removed at all ? Perhaps you have to force/break it away in order to fit aftermarket PCV. ? Not brave enough to do that yet until I know more.
Didn't seem to be excessive amounts of oil in breather pipe by the way.
Thanks for you input again, will persevere.
 

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yes i think that cap is sealed and needs cutting off,
On my old ford that did the same it was only when i took the manifold off and turned it upsidedown that i could see the buildup of water/oil mix pour out, was down to short cold trips and winter months.
whats the underside of the oil cap look like?
 

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The cap is a snap fit there are three little lugs that the cap fits on to its near impossible to get off intact. If you can get the hose off you could try connecting a bit of tube to the stub and see if you can blow into the rocker box. If you can it's likely diaphragm is goosed

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Discussion Starter #12
yes i think that cap is sealed and needs cutting off,
On my old ford that did the same it was only when i took the manifold off and turned it upsidedown that i could see the buildup of water/oil mix pour out, was down to short cold trips and winter months.
whats the underside of the oil cap look like?
Underside of oil filler cap looks fine, no sign of any emusified oil. Don't really use the car much in the Winter and not for short trips; it's a 2nd car I use on sunny days with the roof down. ( Having a bit of adventure before dementia sort of thing )

Think I'll wait until I have the aftermarket part before I start cutting things apart, then I'll know what I'm dealing with. Incidentally the PCV Valve Kit is made by Bersa-Tools-ru, Russian manufacture priced $38 (£28.76) on eBay.

I'd better sort it sooner rather than later, don't want inlet valves/ports etc gunked up any more than is necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The cap is a snap fit there are three little lugs that the cap fits on to its near impossible to get off intact. If you can get the hose off you could try connecting a bit of tube to the stub and see if you can blow into the rocker box. If you can it's likely diaphragm is goosed

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Thanks for that windy, will give that a go, now I have the nack of removing the breather hose. If it's proved to be faulty will wait until I have aftermarket part before I take anything apart. Much appreciate your help.
 

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possible solutions.

Thanks for that windy, will give that a go, now I have the nack of removing the breather hose. If it's proved to be faulty will wait until I have aftermarket part before I take anything apart. Much appreciate your help.
I'm presuming you have a NON Turbo model EP6 engine.
Before you break the rocker cover listen out to your engine "Whilst driving DRVING" for a whistling noise only whilst coming to the idle.
If it is whistling at the very last part of the revs when slowing down whilst driving it, ( not revving it in natural) then don't touch the PCB valve it is working fine.

But if you must remove the cover to check/inspect the diagram you will need to unclip the right side square catch then put a flat blade screw driver under the lip. Then use another flat blade screwdriver on the left side and pop it off.

If it breaks you can use windscreen sealer neoprene to hold it in place. Just leave a heavy weight on it over night.

The other thing is, if you drive stop/start all the time the engine has no way of cleaning the intake manifold as the fuel is injected after that point.
I would recommend you get the intake system walnut blasted.
If the smoke still exists after idling a long time, then this is the reason why your vale guides are worn prematurely. The dirty vale stems have worn away at the valve stem seals.

Valve guides are cheap from FCP Euro and come with a lifetime warranty
https://www.fcpeuro.com/products/mini-engine-valve-stem-oil-seal-cooper-11340033950 under $80 USD

You can use compressed air and a locking a tool for locking the crank to keep the valves up and pistons from moving, then you can remove & replace them whilst still leaving the head on. you will be required to re-time the cams so many cam locking kits come with the lock tool.

If it's a non turbo engine then you will need special tools to remove & refit the VVT intake cam.

Cheers Rick
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I'm presuming you have a NON Turbo model EP6 engine.
Before you break the rocker cover listen out to your engine "Whilst driving DRVING" for a whistling noise only whilst coming to the idle.
If it is whistling at the very last part of the revs when slowing down whilst driving it, ( not revving it in natural) then don't touch the PCB valve it is working fine.

But if you must remove the cover to check/inspect the diagram you will need to unclip the right side square catch then put a flat blade screw driver under the lip. Then use another flat blade screwdriver on the left side and pop it off.

If it breaks you can use windscreen sealer neoprene to hold it in place. Just leave a heavy weight on it over night.

The other thing is, if you drive stop/start all the time the engine has no way of cleaning the intake manifold as the fuel is injected after that point.
I would recommend you get the intake system walnut blasted.
If the smoke still exists after idling a long time, then this is the reason why your vale guides are worn prematurely. The dirty vale stems have worn away at the valve stem seals.

Valve guides are cheap from FCP Euro and come with a lifetime warranty
https://www.fcpeuro.com/products/mini-engine-valve-stem-oil-seal-cooper-11340033950 under $80 USD

You can use compressed air and a locking a tool for locking the crank to keep the valves up and pistons from moving, then you can remove & replace them whilst still leaving the head on. you will be required to re-time the cams so many cam locking kits come with the lock tool.

If it's a non turbo engine then you will need special tools to remove & refit the VVT intake cam.

Cheers Rick
Thanks Rick for your input, forum members have been very helpful on this topic.
Yes it is a non turbo EP6 Engine. Glad you mentioned whistling when slowing down at end of revs; aftermarket part supplier also mentions this as one of the symptoms of a failing PCV. Can't say I've ever noticed this. I also carried out Windy 1603's test of connecting hose to breather inlet on cam cover and giving it a good blow ( no laughing now). Result no passage of air and full back pressure. So looks like PCV is NOT faulty.

Wierd it only smokes on prelonged idle, if it were worn valve guides I would expect it to smoke on cold start-up which it does not

Maybe get it walnut blasted if I can find anyone on the Isle of Wight that does this.
As for valve guide replacement from your description of what's involved that's beyond my scope these days.

Think I'll have to take a raincheck on this issue for now. The car runs ok, the smoking is not excessive. I can live with it in the short term but will have to sort it eventually.

Tanks to all forum members for your help on this subject. At least I Haven't wasted my time changing the PCV and I now know a lot more about PCV's than I did before.

Kind regards
Ralph
 

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You should not need walnut blasting it only needed on THP engine as it has direct injection so no fuel in inlet tract to wash oil residue off the valves

The early engines had very poor oil control in general and drink oil my daughters old 207 would use 1/2 ltr every 1000 miles which was classed as normal so a little smoke after prolonged idle maybe normal

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Thanks for the reply stripe88. I could give that a go, only problem living on the Isle of Wight, most roads are full of traffic and pretty much 30/40 limits. We do have one stretch of dual carriageway about a mile long; Big Deal.
Maybe go out late at night when the roads are quite and give it a blast. Then get stopped by the police who will discover an embarrassed 70 year old boy racer with the lame excuse of trying to clean his inlet manifold. 'Not heard that one before sir', says Plod.
Living in Jersey, I know the problem - my answer to sort out my hydraulic tappets is just to drive in lower than normal gear for about 5 miles and keep the revs up (say 3,000 to 4,000). The engine doesn't care about the speed, it's the revs that do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
You should not need walnut blasting it only needed on THP engine as it has direct injection so no fuel in inlet tract to wash oil residue off the valves

The early engines had very poor oil control in general and drink oil my daughters old 207 would use 1/2 ltr every 1000 miles which was classed as normal so a little smoke after prolonged idle maybe normal

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Thanks again for that windy, much appreciated your advice over this issue.
I only do about 2k miles a year in the car, Just use it on Sunny days with the roof down, so oil consumption is never going to be an issue.

My every day car is Honda Jazz 100% reliable but uterly boring (old gits car).
The Peugeots great fun, got a bit of soul to it, but as for reliability a bit of a question mark over that.

Decided to leave things well alone and just enjoy it this summer.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Living in Jersey, I know the problem - my answer to sort out my hydraulic tappets is just to drive in lower than normal gear for about 5 miles and keep the revs up (say 3,000 to 4,000). The engine doesn't care about the speed, it's the revs that do it.
Thanks for that tip Ian, yes I guess that would do the job.
 
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